#1
Hello I've seen great guitarrists say that they practiced 8 to 10 hours a day? But how is that even possible? They do exercises or something? I want to learn what they do
#2
Quote by DBKGUITAR
Hello I've seen great guitarrists say that they practiced 8 to 10 hours a day? But how is that even possible? They do exercises or something? I want to learn what they do


10 hours gives you enough time to work on literally everything about music, it's what people don't understand about things like Steve Vai's 10 hour workout; it's so much more than just 10 hours of exercises.
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#3
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
10 hours gives you enough time to work on literally everything about music, it's what people don't understand about things like Steve Vai's 10 hour workout; it's so much more than just 10 hours of exercises.

Is it possible to find that workout?
#4
That's dedication, Holmes.

It's not all about playing:, though there's plenty of that. There's learning theory (for some), composition...anything at all involved with improving your underand ingredients & proficiency.

That said, some days, it IS all abut playing. 8 hours isn't much more than a typical guitar teacher might play over the course of a day, just showing examples and jamming with students.
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#5
Quote by DBKGUITAR
Is it possible to find that workout?


http://lmgtfy.com/?q=steve+vai+10+hour+workout

Very few of those links will have the information you need to really make it the 10 hour though, that's a hell of a lot of work and variations and things that you literally cannot tab. You need to have the full explanation to make it in to the 10 hours and have it be everything it should be.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
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#6
Quote by DBKGUITAR
Is it possible to find that workout?



Well; there are tabs and Guitar Pro downloads for it in the tab section of this very website, so check them out.

The real problem is that most people don't have the luxury of spending ten hours a day in the woodshed. Food, rent and car payments tend to get in the way of such musical indulgence.
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#7
It's possible through extreme dedication and willpower. That's why people like Petrucci and Vai are that good.
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#8
About a decade ago, one of the rock stars on a panel at the Dallas Guitar Show stunned the audience with an exchange that went something like:

RS: "How many people here picked up the guitar to learn how to play like me or some other guitar idol?"

<many raised hands in audience>

RS: "Here's the truth: ain't gonna happen."

<many startled gasps in audience>

RS: "Every day when I get up, the first thing I do is play some guitar. Then I have breakfast. Then I play some guitar. Then I do some stuff & have lunch. Then I play guitar. Then I do some stuff, have dinner, hang out with my lady and or friends and so forth. The last thing I do before going to bed is play some more guitar. If you don't put in that kind of time, you'll never be able to play like I do."


(I wouldn't be surprised to find that guy takes a guitar on holidays.)

Now, that may not be true for everybody- the amount of native talent you have factors in there somewhere, as does the quality of your practice time- but it illustrates what kind of regimen some people actually have to hone, perfect, and maintain their chops.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#10
I think some of you guys may be missing the point: TS's question wasn't at all about finding the time but about what these people actually do in this time.

At least that's the way I parsed it...
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#11
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
I think some of you guys may be missing the point: TS's question wasn't at all about finding the time but about what these people actually do in this time.

At least that's the way I parsed it...

exactly xD
#12
damned if i know

i'd also say that quality of practise matters. if you're mucking about for 10 hours you'd be better doing 1 hour of proper practise.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
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#13
Every guitarist has gaps in their knowledge or weakness in certain techniques. Once you ID them, the question is how much time you devote to shoring up that knowledge or technique.

Mark Knopfler once said in an interview in he 80s that he couldn't play fast like the neoclassical shredders that were popping up at hat time. Who knows, perhaps he spent time practicing his speed techniques?

Or there's developing a broader and deeper understanding of the various scales. Or rhythms.

And then there's the infinite number of possible tunings...

I know I can't do sweeps like YJM, 2-hand hammer-ons and pulls like EVH, vibrato like BB King, pinch harmonics like Billy Gibbons, or slide like Ry Cooder- those would all be areas where I would potentially focus on practicing.

Especially if I were going to call myself a pro.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#14
I also think it's a balancing act between working on your weak points, but also not devoting so much time to something you're not that great at when the time might be better spent getting really good at something you're pretty good at. For all the posts about these guys who practise for 10 hours a day, you're still hearing (on their records) what they want you to hear. Which is worth bearing in mind. They're not letting you hear their weak points.

I also think it's dangerous to act like you can't get good unless you play 10 hours a day. Maybe you can't be the absolute best player in the world, but you can get pretty good with a little practise every day (or not even every day, every other day or every couple of days). It also puts off new players.

there's also a school of thought that says that practising too much can be harmful, as you'll be tired and maybe even practising bad habits etc. Letting your subconscious work on things can help as well, for example.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#15
You'd probably give yourself a repetitive stress injury trying to do technique workouts 8+ hours every day, so it's really not all about "guitar practice". It's about MUSIC practice.

Think about it like work. If you just walked into some work place without any specific goal or task, you'd have a very hard time filling 8 hours, and would likely not get anything significant accomplished even if you did. But when you have specific things to get done, you often find that 8 hours a day is hardly enough to complete them.

The more you play and the more professional you become, you find that you actually have to spend a lot more time on it. Not just practicing guitar itself, but learning new music, reviewing old music, working on new skills generally, writing music, reading music, listening to music, rehearsing with ensembles...

Steve Vai is a classic music school kid. Dude spent hours in the woodshed on the very basics of music: playing and listening. Once you have chops and ears, the challenge is finding lots of material to which to apply them. That's getting work and becoming professional. I imagine for people like Vai, it's hard to get everything done in 40 hours a week, just because there's so much music to do.

You want to fill your musical time, first you gotta have some musical goals.
#16
I can play for 8 hours some days but that's really pushing it and there's no way in hell id spend half of that time doing exercises 2-3 hours really pushing the limits practicing speed, accuracy etc tops... I'm not a robot.

I spend the majority of my time songwriting, improv and creating. I still focus on all the things I do in drills but make it fun.
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#17
Honestly, when I first read this, I was wondering the same, since I only thought about the violin, and not being able to play past 30min a day.

But now thinking about it, I can grab my guitar just to turn the music from my head, into actual music, real quick. Next thing I will realize, is that I have been sitting there for hours playing guitar. I think I probably freak people out because once I grab my guitar, I forget everything else.

Can't wait until that starts to happen with my violin So yeah, think it just depends on the person, like, I know my brothers probably can only practice for a few minutes before getting bored, but I can see other musicians who will sit there for hours like me.
#18
Quote by Dave_Mc
I also think it's a balancing act between working on your weak points, but also not devoting so much time to something you're not that great at when the time might be better spent getting really good at something you're pretty good at. For all the posts about these guys who practise for 10 hours a day, you're still hearing (on their records) what they want you to hear. Which is worth bearing in mind. They're not letting you hear their weak points.

I also think it's dangerous to act like you can't get good unless you play 10 hours a day. Maybe you can't be the absolute best player in the world, but you can get pretty good with a little practise every day (or not even every day, every other day or every couple of days). It also puts off new players.

there's also a school of thought that says that practising too much can be harmful, as you'll be tired and maybe even practising bad habits etc. Letting your subconscious work on things can help as well, for example.

This post. This. Whole. Damn. Post.

I'm in complete agreement on balancing Dave mentioned. In my opinion, one of the most important things a guitarist needs to do is develop their own sound and style. When you think of basically any elite level guitarist, they all generally have one or two things they're really known for and excel at.
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#19
Quote by matthewzguitarz
Honestly, when I first read this, I was wondering the same, since I only thought about the violin, and not being able to play past 30min a day.

But now thinking about it, I can grab my guitar just to turn the music from my head, into actual music, real quick. Next thing I will realize, is that I have been sitting there for hours playing guitar. I think I probably freak people out because once I grab my guitar, I forget everything else.

Can't wait until that starts to happen with my violin So yeah, think it just depends on the person, like, I know my brothers probably can only practice for a few minutes before getting bored, but I can see other musicians who will sit there for hours like me.

Just jamming can help you improve but that's not the practice we're talking about. Practice is boring a lot of the time. Practice is hard.
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#20
Quote by sjones
This post. This. Whole. Damn. Post.

I'm in complete agreement on balancing Dave mentioned. In my opinion, one of the most important things a guitarist needs to do is develop their own sound and style. When you think of basically any elite level guitarist, they all generally have one or two things they're really known for and excel at.




Also I'd say the main thing is ensuring that you still enjoy playing. If you want to play, that's half the battle won. If that means only playing and practising occasionally, so be it. It might not be as good as practising religiously for 10 hours a day (though even that is debatable, as I said above), but it's an awful lot better than starting out thinking you have to have a demoralisingly draconian practice schedule and just quitting
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#21
If you have a $1,000,000 dollar album deal it's your job (8 hours day 5 days a week at least) to play guitar and be a musician, what most people are paid to do in an office, he is being paid to do on a guitar. It involves keep your hands and brain fresh and active with the instrument, keeping all your thoery relevent and strengthen so you can pick bits out to write songs and improvise.
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#22
Well I spend about 10-8 hours working on music whether it be watching YouTube tutorials or learning music theory but I actually on play my guitar about 4-5 hours. I hate to say it but practice guitar for more that 5 hours is really boring.

Not all 10 hours has to be play guitar.
#23
I personally think 10 hours a day is too much and unnecessary - you're setting yourself up to burn out or injure yourself. I think 3-4 hours per day is enough and many professional musicians do no more than this.
#24
Quote by pia98jf
I personally think 10 hours a day is too much and unnecessary - you're setting yourself up to burn out or injure yourself. I think 3-4 hours per day is enough and many professional musicians do no more than this.


What's necessary and what's not necessary depends on what you want to achieve.
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#25
not really. there definitely comes a point where you're doing more harm than good. if you tried to practise for 24 hours a day, say, it wouldn't be too long before you'd be in the hospital.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#27
Quote by ProphetToJables
If you have a $1,000,000 dollar album deal it's your job (8 hours day 5 days a week at least) to play guitar and be a musician, what most people are paid to do in an office, he is being paid to do on a guitar. It involves keep your hands and brain fresh and active with the instrument, keeping all your thoery relevent and strengthen so you can pick bits out to write songs and improvise.

I'd venture to guess that the vast majority of people with album deals still don't put 40 hours of "work" into their instrument per week.

If you think about it, they're likely to have multiple press engagements in any given week which will cut into their time. Traveling from city to city on tour is also going to take away from practice time since it's likely they're not going to have the ability to practice during the ride. The exception would be those with HUGE record deals on major labels who are traveling by bus, but many bands travel by van which would not allow for practice. Even those on buses are likely to sleep odd hours since they're probably not getting to sleep until the wee hours of the morning, then waking up maybe a handful of hours before the load in and soundcheck for the next gig. Sure, they'll probably get an hour or two of warm ups in each night before the show but that's likely going to be based around your typical finger exercises and things to get them prepped for that night's gig.

When bands aren't on tour then musicians may put closer to 40 hours a week into their instrument, but even than I can't imagine it's a vast increase.
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#28
that's what i'd have thought. I also would strongly suspect that the more rockstar-type players probably don't practise as much (doing a lot of drinking and such). Guthrie Govan or steve vai or someone like that whose fame and continuing employment are based on their skill at guitar may well practise those kind of hours- but I get the feeling (could be wrong) that your average fairly famous guitar band guitarist who's not a virtuoso probably doesn't practise as much as that.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#29
Quote by Dave_Mc
that's what i'd have thought. I also would strongly suspect that the more rockstar-type players probably don't practise as much (doing a lot of drinking and such). Guthrie Govan or steve vai or someone like that whose fame and continuing employment are based on their skill at guitar may well practise those kind of hours- but I get the feeling (could be wrong) that your average fairly famous guitar band guitarist who's not a virtuoso probably doesn't practise as much as that.

Due to my job (radio) I've met and been around a good number of touring acts, and I'd say you're probably accurate in that assessment based on my experiences.
Quote by Zeppelin71
Umm. . .uh. . .your mom touched sjones' dick. YOUR MOM TOUCHED OUR GUITARISTS GENITALS IN A CAMPER AT A BIKER FESTIVAL! truth.
#30
^

of course, that's not to say they don't practise at all or anything like that (or that not practising for 10 hours a day makes you a slacker or anything like that- I've been arguing the opposite throughout the thread ). but yeah.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#31
Quote by sjones
I'd venture to guess that the vast majority of people with album deals still don't put 40 hours of "work" into their instrument per week.

If you think about it, they're likely to have multiple press engagements in any given week which will cut into their time. Traveling from city to city on tour is also going to take away from practice time since it's likely they're not going to have the ability to practice during the ride. The exception would be those with HUGE record deals on major labels who are traveling by bus, but many bands travel by van which would not allow for practice. Even those on buses are likely to sleep odd hours since they're probably not getting to sleep until the wee hours of the morning, then waking up maybe a handful of hours before the load in and soundcheck for the next gig. Sure, they'll probably get an hour or two of warm ups in each night before the show but that's likely going to be based around your typical finger exercises and things to get them prepped for that night's gig.

When bands aren't on tour then musicians may put closer to 40 hours a week into their instrument, but even than I can't imagine it's a vast increase.

I agree in principle with what you're saying, but a professional musician, when not touring, (and in many cases even during touring) will spend a lot of time jamming with band members and writing material for the next album/tour, which I think we can consider as hours put into practicing their intrument.
Personaly, I've found that when my band was touring we didn't need to rehearse/practice our intruments because the act of gigging almost every night was rehearsal enough to keep us tight and keep every musician in top form on their particular instrument.
#32
virginity and a degree of autism.

or, you know, real drive and passion. You won't get anywhere forcing yourself to do what you don't wish to.
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#33
Ever since I got laid off from my job I've been practicing for 8-12 hours a day...
#34
Well there's a lot of things you can actually practice without your guitar in your hands!

For example, while sitting in class, you can bring a pick, and practice alternate picking on your pants seam.

While doing random stuff, you can recite scales backwards, forwards, etc.

You can hum/sing in certain keys or modes and stuff..

So probably 3-4 hours of playing and 3-4 hours of thinking about music while they're out shopping or watching movies xD
#35
^ agreed. i might not practise anywhere near enough, but a lot of the time I'm thinking about guitar. Even listening to music you can be thinking about how the guitar player might be playing it, etc. etc.

though the pants thing might be a fairly quick route to having to sign the sex offenders' register
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#36
One of the best music teachers I ever had once told me this: "Practice smarter, not harder."

Even if you aren't practicing 8 hours like Steve Vai, a few hours of meaningful practice (with set objectives and set ways to reach them) are better than eight hours of noodling. Vai's been at it long enough he knows how to get things done but you have to work up to it, and that's the important part. Because it's not about the destination, it's about the journey.