A "Google Earth" of all your financial transactions to be created by the government

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#1
"This bill (creating the CFPB) was supposed to be about regulating Wall Street. Instead, it's creating a Google Earth on every financial transaction. That's right: the government will be able to see every detail of your finances. Your permission - not needed," Sen. Enzi said.

"They can look right down to the tiny details of the time and place where you pulled cash out of an ATM," Enzi warned.

And, there's nothing you can do about, since Americans don't have the ability to "opt out" or prohibit the government from collecting their personal financial data, Enzi said:

"You can't tell 'em to stay out of your records. It's not possible. If your data is being collected, you do not have the option to opt out. Nor, does the CFPD need any kind of permission from you to gather your personal information."

Enzi called for greater congressional oversight authority to ensure the CFPB does not abuse its power, but Republican still dropped plans to filibuster the nomination, caving to threats by Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) to change the filibuster rules.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=sSZ56_n0Cyw
Quote by SlinkyBlue


The solution is simple and obvious.

We revolt against ourselves. Mass suicide. The ultimate revolution.
#2
That's why I pay cash.
Tomorrow will take us away
Far from home
No one will ever know our names
But the bards' songs will remain
Tomorrow will take it away
The fear of today
It will be gone
Due to our magic songs

ALL HAIL CELESTIA
#3
Isn't the hysteria regarding these privacy issues a symptom of the Twitter generation's obsession with thinking that anybody and everybody actually gives a shit about what they're up to?
#5
Quote by Johnny_Ibanez
Isn't the hysteria regarding these privacy issues a symptom of the Twitter generation's obsession with thinking that anybody and everybody actually gives a shit about what they're up to?



It's more likely an older concern about upholding the principles of government and civil rights.
#6
How does this interfere with your civil rights given that your information will almost certainly never be looked at because you are small, uninteresting and unimportant?
#7
Quote by Johnny_Ibanez
Isn't the hysteria regarding these privacy issues a symptom of the Twitter generation's obsession with thinking that anybody and everybody actually gives a shit about what they're up to?


I don't think it's hysteria to believe that we should be able to reasonably expect our private information to remain private.

Of course there's no harm in anyone knowing that I bought a salad from Jason's Deli or get gas at the Shell station, but it's also none of their business. Barring criminal activity, my purchases aren't inside the purview of Gov't.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#8
Quote by TooktheAtrain


It's more likely an older concern about upholding the principles of government and civil rights.

Still, the philosophy of seeing what everybody does at any time, anywhere, is encouraged by media like Twitter.
#9
Quote by Johnny_Ibanez
How does this interfere with your civil rights given that your information will almost certainly never be looked at because you are small, uninteresting and unimportant?


I may indeed be. However, for individuals that are not 'small' 'uninteresting' and 'unimportant' it is important to the democratic process that the vested interests of people in positions of power are not mobilised to discredit or smear these individuals. Also, there is the problem of personal security with unauthorised access to this information.
#11
If some poor sap wants to see how much I spend on take away every month after I pay my bills, let him.
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Pooping is well good though, to be fair.


I've got a handle on the fiction.

I'm losing my grip, 'cos I'm losing my fingers.
#12
Next news: Goverment urges all drug dealers to keep neat books and implement credit card payment
Quote by SleepTalkinMan
"Ooh! Straight-jackets online! Christmas sorted."
#13
Quote by TooktheAtrain
I may indeed be. However, for individuals that are not 'small' 'uninteresting' and 'unimportant' it is important to the democratic process that the vested interests of people in positions of power are not mobilised to discredit or smear these individuals. Also, there is the problem of personal security with unauthorised access to this information.



On the contrary, wouldn't it be better for democracy if the finances and vested interests of those in power were subject to scrutiny?
#14
*pulls money out*

*buys **** ring*
Most of the important things


in the world have been accomplished


by people who have kept on


trying when there seemed to be no hope at all
#15
So they can see when and where I use my credit cards?
I thought they've been doing this forever.
██████████████████████████
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LET'S GO BUCKS
#16
Quote by Johnny_Ibanez
On the contrary, wouldn't it be better for democracy if the finances and vested interests of those in power were subject to scrutiny?


Because you know that those in power will get affected by this the most
Quote by SleepTalkinMan
"Ooh! Straight-jackets online! Christmas sorted."
#17
Quote by Johnny_Ibanez
On the contrary, wouldn't it be better for democracy if the finances and vested interests of those in power were subject to scrutiny?


That's a moot point, because those who are implementing the surveillance are those who are least likely to be subject to it, and they are subordinate to or constitute the power elite, the politicians you are talking about.

Purchase information is but one source to draw from to discredit social agitators that gain any sort of momentum or notability, one colour in a palette with which to paint extremely ugly pictures. One can confabulate extremely damning and libelous narratives with the selective editing of real information, and then "leak" the information as a form of political assassination. Such a narrative would be nigh on impossible to disprove, especially if they are familiar with the minutiae of a target's life.

So the potential for abuse is not really worth it, but this is hardly the tipping point.


So, can you think of any way this isn't grossly undermining the democratic process?
Last edited by TooktheAtrain at Jul 22, 2013,
#18
Quote by AeroRocker
So they can see when and where I use my credit cards?
I thought they've been doing this forever.


Not all the micro details and not the government.
Quote by SlinkyBlue


The solution is simple and obvious.

We revolt against ourselves. Mass suicide. The ultimate revolution.
#19
Quote by Johnny_Ibanez
How does this interfere with your civil rights given that your information will almost certainly never be looked at because you are small, uninteresting and unimportant?


You're fucking retarded if this isn't trolling.
#20
Quote by Johnny_Ibanez
How does this interfere with your civil rights given that your information will almost certainly never be looked at because you are small, uninteresting and unimportant?


If this is the kind of shit that is happening now, imagine how people will be monitored in ten years from now... They are slowly taking away peoples rights, this is very scary stuff.

This is also a message from the government reminding you that they can f*ck with you whenever they want. Wake up.
Last edited by Redsectoreh at Jul 22, 2013,
#21
Well, I can give you a real example all the way from Sweden for the "agnostics" in this thread:

Here in Sweden there is a weird TV license law which states that every household that owns a TV or radio is subject to a license fee. They want to extend this law to include computers as well, I don't know how far they've come with that though. Anyway, the interesting thing is that they don't give a f**k about what you use your TV for. The license fee suppose to finance the national TV stations, although even if you don't have access to TV channels at all, you're still obliged to pay the fee. So I guess we can all agree on that it's a pretty corrupt law, right?

Well, it didn't use to be a problem because obviously they can't come into your home (not yet at least) and check if your are hiding a TV or something so most people never confessed volountarily. So this TV license authority called "Radiotjänsten" started to cooperate with major electronic chains and everyone who has purchased a TV with a credit card eventually got a personal visit to their home to make them confess.

Is it an abuse of power? You tell me...
Last edited by MetalMullet at Jul 22, 2013,
#22

Do as you're told, citizens, because there's no such thing as a victim of the government, just people that cease to exist.

ALL GLORY TO THE HYPNOBAMA!
Last edited by tukk04 at Jul 22, 2013,
#23
Quote by MetalMullet
Well, I can give you a real example all the way from Sweden for the "agnostics" in this thread:

Here in Sweden there is a weird TV license law which states that every household that owns a TV or radio is subject to a license fee. They want to extend this law to include computers as well, I don't know how far they've come with that though. Anyway, the interesting thing is that they don't give a f**k about what you use your TV for. The license fee suppose to finance the national TV stations, although even if you don't have access to TV channels at all, you're still obliged to pay the fee. So I guess we can all agree on that it's a pretty corrupt law, right?

Well, it didn't use to be a problem because obviously they can't come into your home (not yet at least) and check if your are hiding a TV or something so most people never confessed volountarily. So this TV license authority called "Radiotjänsten" started to cooperate with major electronic chains and everyone who has purchased a TV with a credit card eventually got a personal visit to their home to make them confess.

Is it an abuse of power? You tell me...


Wow. That's effed up......
Quote by SlinkyBlue


The solution is simple and obvious.

We revolt against ourselves. Mass suicide. The ultimate revolution.
#24
Quote by genghisgandhi
plus you're too young to have a credit card.


C'mon, you spoiled the effect of that statement.

Even if I was able to have a credit card, I'd still pay cash. Used $20 bills. Untraceable.
Tomorrow will take us away
Far from home
No one will ever know our names
But the bards' songs will remain
Tomorrow will take it away
The fear of today
It will be gone
Due to our magic songs

ALL HAIL CELESTIA
#25
I don't care, let the government see all the sick fetish sites I signed up for.
#26
Quote by Johnny_Ibanez
How does this interfere with your civil rights given that your information will almost certainly never be looked at because you are small, uninteresting and unimportant?

It's like you're sat there going "Look at all this privacy and all these rights. Just take them, I don't even need them! Fuck it man, take them all".

People are giving their lives to get these rights right now across the world, stop being a fucking moron.
#28
Quote by Johnny_Ibanez
Isn't the hysteria regarding these privacy issues a symptom of the Twitter generation's obsession with thinking that anybody and everybody actually gives a shit about what they're up to?

Didn't even read beyond this point yet, but people like you infuriate me. Please commit suicide.


Quote by CoreysMonster

I still like cho0onger more than the 2 of you

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joke's on you, i actually fuck my cat
#29
While I don't doubt that the us gov is ramping up financial surveillance, to call it a google earth of transactions is ****ing ridiculous.
| (• ◡•)| (❍ᴥ❍ʋ
#30
Quote by Johnny_Ibanez
How does this interfere with your civil rights given that your information will almost certainly never be looked at because you are small, uninteresting and unimportant?


that's like saying taking away your vote isn't interfering with civil rights because you are too stupid to vote for the right person.

it doesn't matter how insignificant you are, the point is that the government is eroding privacy rights for just about everyone and there seems to be no mainstream recourse for the average citizen.
#32
Guys, why does privacy matter on an individual level? You're so unimportant that there should be laws forcing construction companies to build residential areas solely out of glass. It would make sure police could see potential criminals and smash their way through the house towards them. That's a good thing, right?


Quote by CoreysMonster

I still like cho0onger more than the 2 of you

Quote by OneHappyCamper
joke's on you, i actually fuck my cat
#33
Quote by Johnny_Ibanez
Isn't the hysteria regarding these privacy issues a symptom of the Twitter generation's obsession with thinking that anybody and everybody actually gives a shit about what they're up to?

pretty much, lol
___

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she was saying things like... do you want to netflix and chill but just the chill part...too bad she'll never know that I only like the Netflix part...
Last edited by WCPhils at Jul 22, 2013,
#34
Quote by blake1221
You're fucking retarded if this isn't trolling.

It's a useful perspective to keep yourself in check.

I mean there's a reason drug dealers only take cash/sexual favors.
BOOM-SHAKALAKALAKA-BOOM-SHAKALAKUNGA
#36
Quote by Dreadnought
I've ran out of fucks to give

tfw you're long since too jaded to give a dickbutt about civil rights
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#37
I was under the impression that this has already been happening for decades? Don't they catch criminals like this all the time?
Listen. I'm sorry.
#38
Quote by vilk
I was under the impression that this has already been happening for decades? Don't they catch criminals like this all the time?


This is true, at least for transactions over $10,000. Every time someone deposits or removes ten grand or more, banks have to report it. Its called a kiting report or something like that, I think. Its used to prevent money laundering and fraud, supposedly.
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#39
but like, let's say there's a murder, and the murder weapon is a craftsman electric drill manufactured that year-- can't they go and look up everyone who's bought that model of electric drill that year (the credit card info, that is)? or is that only on crime tv shows...?
Listen. I'm sorry.
#40
The government should install cameras in every home. Most of us are too unimportant right? Then I guess there shouldn't be a problem...
Quote by SlinkyBlue


The solution is simple and obvious.

We revolt against ourselves. Mass suicide. The ultimate revolution.
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