#1
hey guys:
what can I do with circle of fifth or fourth? maybe making chord progression?

I learned it but don't know what to do with it?

and by the way, do you move clockwise or counter clockwise, jazz guitarists seem to move counter clockwise,.
#2
Egads. This is kind of a big question.

There are two main aspects to the circle of fifths. First, it explains the relationship between keys.

But it's also used in chord progressions, because of the tendency of chords to want to resolve down a fifth. This is where the concept of a ii-V-I comes from, say: Am D G. This is moving "counterclockwise" because chords like to descend in fifths. You can actually keep this going for a very long time, to powerful effect: experiment on your guitar playing the sequence (just do all major chords for now) E A D G C F Bb. Notice that feeling of falling the whole sequence gives you, how each chord wants to land on the next one down? Stepping into a cycle of fifths progression can be a really powerful thing, and a cycle of fifths coming to a rest maybe be one of the few musical ideas we are hard-wired to have an emotional response to.

If you were to do a progression clockwise it'd feel extremely choppy - you're swimming upstream.
#3
Typical Circle of 5ths movement is root movement by 4th - C F Bb Eb...

In practice, you don't see too many progression that follow the pattern through more than a couple changes at a time.

http://bbsimg.ngfiles.com/13/22653000/ngbbs4d9cb6213f19c.jpg
http://www.electricchili.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/ScreenHunter_15-Jun.-20-08.49.jpg

Those charts show typical progressions.

Often you'll find other chords between those chords, but the harmonic emphasis is usually on those in the chart.