Anyone have experience with Izotope Ozone and Voxengo Deconvolver tone matching?

#1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zl684tupzpk

This guy did some insane stuff with only a $200 Izotope Ozone Mastering/EQ plugin and some cheap/free amp simulator plugins.

An example of a John Petrucci tone mainly using Izotope and another guy's Kemper:

https://soundcloud.com/ivn-91/dream-theater-kemper-eq


Or this guy doing the Rust in Peace tone with Izotope and an Axe FX:

https://soundcloud.com/soundshell777/megadeth-axe-2-ir-eq-match-mp3


Have any of you guys tried this method yet? My new Eleven Rack is coming in tomorrow and I'm going to be trying the demo of Izotope to give it a shot and see how good I can produce some tones and buy it also if it works right.
#2
I've played around with it quite a bit. It's cool for covers, where you want to match that tone, but they're tones made for certain mixes, and it kind of forces you to mix it a certain way, otherwise it'll sound weird. If you want to use match EQ on something more serious, you should use it to match a raw guitar track. That way, you can process it the same as you would if you mic'd up the amp. It's basically the same idea as the Kemper and the Axe-FX's profiling feature, just not as extensive, since you're not actually playing through the real amp when you're profiling it.
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#3
Quote by MatrixClaw
I've played around with it quite a bit. It's cool for covers, where you want to match that tone, but they're tones made for certain mixes, and it kind of forces you to mix it a certain way, otherwise it'll sound weird. If you want to use match EQ on something more serious, you should use it to match a raw guitar track. That way, you can process it the same as you would if you mic'd up the amp. It's basically the same idea as the Kemper and the Axe-FX's profiling feature, just not as extensive, since you're not actually playing through the real amp when you're profiling it.


Thanks for the input...I'm not understanding this too much though.

If I were to take a clip, like the Dream Theater/Petrucci riff, and emulate that tone why would it be weird to use as a tone to just jam with through Pro Tools and out my monitors? Is it due to the effects and EQ already done to the clip or what?

I'm assuming if I want that Petrucci tone some more I can take his tone settings video of just him playing and emulate it better according to what you're saying, right?

This video is what I'm talking about:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i24e8icZG1o
#4
Used Ozone for a bit.

Honestly found it pretty gimmicky.
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#5
It's cool at first.

Then you realize that it's not that specific tone that made it a good song.
#6
I just wanted to follow up on this thread to say that I finally tried Ozone 5 and matched Petruccis Kindred Spirits tone. I'm loving it and I mixed it perfectly with my Alesis DM10 drums running through Addictive Drums.
#7
Great video. I have the Ozone EQ, but i was not aware of the matching feature. As MegaDTSX said, you will get the sound made to fit the whole track mix. I won't fit yours. But you can start with the matching, and work from there to your own mix.
#8
Quote by ChemicalFire
Used Ozone for a bit.

Honestly found it pretty gimmicky.
I think it's a pretty solid, powerful set of tools on the whole.

The downside it that it's helped usher in a new breed of self-proclaimed 'mastering engineers' who think a bunch of presets is all you need to master a track. A lot of people assume you need to chain every single module together instead of only using what's necessary for the track.

Because of this, there's quite a lot of snobbery against Izotope products even though they're excellent quality. Half of the people I see moaning about Ozone on Gearslutz etc would have paid the full price for just a single module (like the limiter or EQ) if they were packaged differently.

That said...reverb on a dedicated mastering processor? Lolno.
#9
Quote by kyle62
I think it's a pretty solid, powerful set of tools on the whole.

The downside it that it's helped usher in a new breed of self-proclaimed 'mastering engineers' who think a bunch of presets is all you need to master a track. A lot of people assume you need to chain every single module together instead of only using what's necessary for the track.

Because of this, there's quite a lot of snobbery against Izotope products even though they're excellent quality. Half of the people I see moaning about Ozone on Gearslutz etc would have paid the full price for just a single module (like the limiter or EQ) if they were packaged differently.

That said...reverb on a dedicated mastering processor? Lolno.

Kyle hits it perfect here.

Ozone is great when used correctly. I really only used it for the limiter and occasional EQ. The thing had (last time I tried it) an excellent interface! Call my noobish but I like how 4s limiter and multiband compression (which im not a huge fan of in general) was so simple. It had what I need laid out in a very simple way. To many people in my opinion are wrapped up in vintage looking things with knobs and shit. (Says the guy who uses mainly arturia soft synths).

As for tone matching...waste of time IMHO.
#10
Quote by FireHawk
Kyle hits it perfect here.

Ozone is great when used correctly. I really only used it for the limiter and occasional EQ. The thing had (last time I tried it) an excellent interface! Call my noobish but I like how 4s limiter and multiband compression (which im not a huge fan of in general) was so simple. It had what I need laid out in a very simple way. To many people in my opinion are wrapped up in vintage looking things with knobs and shit. (Says the guy who uses mainly arturia soft synths).

As for tone matching...waste of time IMHO.


I just don't understand why people think tone matching is a "waste of time" if you may be trying to achieve a certain tone for a certain mix..?

I know its an opinion, but please explain how that is a waste of time? A lot of people on here and other forums set out and buy certain equipment to achieve different tones and when you have something such as this at your disposal it can only be helpful, not hurtful.

Of course you have to keep an open mind to what all is going on in the mix to make things sound good. You also want to always continue to evolve and not stick to one thing as well, but again I don't see how a lot of people are seeing this as a waste of time when its fairly easy and intuitive.
#11
Quote by MegaDTSX
I just don't understand why people think tone matching is a "waste of time" if you may be trying to achieve a certain tone for a certain mix..?

I know its an opinion, but please explain how that is a waste of time? A lot of people on here and other forums set out and buy certain equipment to achieve different tones and when you have something such as this at your disposal it can only be helpful, not hurtful.

Of course you have to keep an open mind to what all is going on in the mix to make things sound good. You also want to always continue to evolve and not stick to one thing as well, but again I don't see how a lot of people are seeing this as a waste of time when its fairly easy and intuitive.

I should have been more clear its a waste of time for me. If your going to do covers and stuff then I guess it's great. If your doing original music why do you want to try and rip someone's else's sound?

I want my music to sound like me.

Imagine if everyone tone matched "master of puppets" guitar.

In the end it's your music do what makes you happy.
Last edited by FireHawk at Aug 10, 2013,
#12
Quote by FireHawk
I should have been more clear its a waste of time for me. If your going to do covers and stuff then I guess it's great. If your doing original music why do you want to try and rip someone's else's sound?

I want my music to sound like me.

Imagine if everyone tone matched "master of puppets" guitar.

In the end it's your music do what makes you happy.



Yea I'm assuming there are a lot that would discover this and just strictly emulate one tone and call themselves amazing, so I see that point entirely.

On my end I took a tone I like a lot (Kindred Spirits - Liquid Tension Experiment) and then I made it a little more heavy on the bottom end for a, IMO, better more heavy metal tone.

Emulating then tweaking to make it my own, you know?

Thanks for explaining further. I just hate seeing the same kind of response to this when, if done right, you can be unique still.
#13
Quote by MegaDTSX
I just don't understand why people think tone matching is a "waste of time" if you may be trying to achieve a certain tone for a certain mix..?

Because there's about 30 times more to a 'tone' than just an equaliser curve!

If replicating a kickass guitar sound was as simple as setting up an EQ....the emulated outputs on guitar amps wouldn't suck balls. And the Kemper would cost £40.
#14
Quote by kyle62
Because there's about 30 times more to a 'tone' than just an equaliser curve!

If replicating a kickass guitar sound was as simple as setting up an EQ....the emulated outputs on guitar amps wouldn't suck balls. And the Kemper would cost £40.



Trust me, I know this also. I own a Mesa Mark V combo and plenty of effects and EQ pedals/multi effects boxes to know what works and what doesn't work for me as well. My living situation changed recently where I had to downgrade to an Eleven Rack unit and after finding out about Ozone 5 it's made me realize that for my personal at home studio use I couldn't go really wrong implementing Ozone and tone matching as well.
#15
Of course you can't get a 100% identical tone with matching but with the right tweaking you can get a pretty good and similar tone anyway.

But I don't think this is what Ozone's EQ is for. It's a great learning tool imo.
#16
Quote by MegaDTSX
Trust me, I know this also. I own a Mesa Mark V combo and plenty of effects and EQ pedals/multi effects boxes to know what works and what doesn't work for me as well. My living situation changed recently where I had to downgrade to an Eleven Rack unit and after finding out about Ozone 5 it's made me realize that for my personal at home studio use I couldn't go really wrong implementing Ozone and tone matching as well.


I was at Sweetwater HQ for an Eleven Rack demonstration and that thing sounded great. It was a live jam demo of a bunch of studio musicians.