#1
Hello everyone, I have some questions.

1. How do I memorize where the root and blue not is in a blues scale pattern? I have memorized them all around the neck but can't seem to memorize this part.

2. How can I get better at improvising using all the patterns? I can use the first two (decently) but I suck when I start using any more.

3. Where can I get a jazz guitar chord resource? I have been playing jazz for a while but I would like more advanced fingerings.

4. I have Joe Pass's Solo Jazz Guitar dvd but I am very confused about chord substitution. How do you what notes in a chord to change, and what you would change the notes to? I've watched it 4 times so I understand some of what he is talking about, but I still need clarification.

Thanks for the help. If I worded anything weird then let me know and I will try to explain myself.
Peavey Classic 30
PRS SE Custom Semi-Hollow
+some pedals
#2
All scales seem to have a root minor and a root major, you only need to intentionally know one of them.
For jazz chord stuff, look up common jazz chord progressions. Find the chords and then, prosper!
#3
Quote by TwoPlusTwo
All scales seem to have a root minor and a root major, you only need to intentionally know one of them.
For jazz chord stuff, look up common jazz chord progressions. Find the chords and then, prosper!

What?
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#4
1. Well it's kind of simple really. You have to know all the notes all over the neck. If you know you're playing a C blues scale, you should be able to just find all the C's everywhere and all the Gb's everywhere.

2. I don't think in "patterns". You're talking about them like they're some standardized thing everyone agrees upon when they're not. There's no such things a "patten 1" or "pattern 2". The secret is to know all the notes on the fretboard, and all the notes of the chords you're playing over and in what key.

Know the key, know the chords you're playing over and what notes they contain, play accordingly. The easiest method of soloing is "chord tone soloing": playing notes of the chords. You can also use passing notes and accidentals.

3. If you know the neck, you don't need an online resource. Want to make a Cmaj7 chord? Know where all the C's, E's, G's, and B's are and make the chord yourself. The goal is to be self-reliant. Never need anybody or anything else to prop you up.

This might seem like a heck of a lot of work, but it's worth it. Sooner or later, you'll just internalize all this and you won't need to think for 2 minutes before playing a chord. (if you have to do this now)

4. Substitution is a whole big thing. Generally, you can substitute any chord for any other chord that has the same function. Read up on functional harmony if this confuses you.
"I agree with Matthew about everything" - Everyone
#6
Quote by MattyBoy 1337
1. Well it's kind of simple really. You have to know all the notes all over the neck. If you know you're playing a C blues scale, you should be able to just find all the C's everywhere and all the Gb's everywhere.

2. I don't think in "patterns". You're talking about them like they're some standardized thing everyone agrees upon when they're not. There's no such things a "patten 1" or "pattern 2". The secret is to know all the notes on the fretboard, and all the notes of the chords you're playing over and in what key.

Know the key, know the chords you're playing over and what notes they contain, play accordingly. The easiest method of soloing is "chord tone soloing": playing notes of the chords. You can also use passing notes and accidentals.

3. If you know the neck, you don't need an online resource. Want to make a Cmaj7 chord? Know where all the C's, E's, G's, and B's are and make the chord yourself. The goal is to be self-reliant. Never need anybody or anything else to prop you up.

This might seem like a heck of a lot of work, but it's worth it. Sooner or later, you'll just internalize all this and you won't need to think for 2 minutes before playing a chord. (if you have to do this now)

4. Substitution is a whole big thing. Generally, you can substitute any chord for any other chord that has the same function. Read up on functional harmony if this confuses you.


Cool, thanks. I'll try those out.
Peavey Classic 30
PRS SE Custom Semi-Hollow
+some pedals