#1
I feel like from lurking here these past 4 weeks my technique has improved exponentially and I'm already playing shit I never dreamed I would be able to play. (Been playing for 6+ years but until this year I never really practiced or played properly.)

But now It's like I have nothing to play. When my bro picks up a guitar he plays little licks I guess that sound nice whilst he's noodling but I only really play full songs atm. Do I need to learn some more theory so I can pull off little licks at will? If so what kind of theory should I learn?
#2
Theory won't hurt, but it also won't help unless you have actual music to provide examples. I'd say just keep your ears open and dive into whatever music strikes your fancy. Find something that's interesting to you and internalize it.

Don't forget that technique is more than speed and precision - it's tone and intonation, as well. There are lots of really basic sounding guitar parts that require serious technical finesse to sound good (Little Wing, for example). Making your guitar really sing requires quite a bit more than moving up and down the fretboard. Take the stuff you already know and pick it apart. Make conscious musical decisions about every single note - how much vibrato? slide into the note? how to release the note?
#3
what kind of music do you like?

learn some harder songs from artists you like (by ear).
#4
Quote by johnyere
what kind of music do you like?

learn some harder songs from artists you like (by ear).


Led Zeppelin
#5
Check out free theory + example by mike dodge (google is your friend). That's what I am doing along with learning slow blues by ear.
#6
Theory is always helpful, but I think you just have to look at more music. It's not hard. There's millions of songs out there. Find one you like, and learn it. Then when you're writing or jamming, just borrow some ideas from songs you know and/or use theory to add more to the song or the jam session.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#7
funny you say led zeppelin, i've been listening to them a lot recently.

i say pick a few songs that you really like by them that would also be a little challenging to play, and learn them!
#8
If you decide theory, to save some heartache, learn everything in relation to the major scale, skip the modes, tonic-dominant relationship, and that melody/harmony co-exist.
#9
join a band, play gigs...learn how to deal with live playing situation...

seriously, I have those kind of thought like you before I join a band...but then I realize that playing guitar is not just about technique....playing live in front of people, getting the right sound you want in the stage, stage performance, and things like that
#10
Quote by Wild_One
join a band, play gigs...learn how to deal with live playing situation...

seriously, I have those kind of thought like you before I join a band...but then I realize that playing guitar is not just about technique....playing live in front of people, getting the right sound you want in the stage, stage performance, and things like that


Where exactly did TS mention the whole band thingy?
baab
#11
just to add a little bit to my previous post, a lot of people on this forum say that one of the best ways to improve and practice your technique is by learning songs that 'promote' those techniques.
#13
Quote by My Last Words
Where exactly did TS mention the whole band thingy?


Doesn't matter. Joining a band is a really good way to make yourself improve, especially if you play live to real audiences.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#14
Yeah man if you can play really fast then that's awesome

Now if you want to be more musically creative, you'll need to learn some basic theory. The thing is, you don't need to study that much to have a LOT of options!

Unfortunately it's tough finding a simple music theory lesson that makes everything really easy to start playing and stuff..

So think about the C major scale, and the chords that go in it:

C Dm Em F G Am Bdim

If you can play those chords, then just make random chord progressions like this:

F - G - Am - C
Em - Dm - F - G
C - G - Em - F

and you can play the chords with all sorts of crazy strumming patterns, timing patterns, whatever you want

Then, you just need to learn ONE scale, and you can solo to your hearts content.

------------------------------------------10-12-13--
---------------------------------10-12-13-----------
-------------------------9-10-12--------------------
-----------------9-10-12----------------------------
---------8-10-12------------------------------------
-8-10-12--------------------------------------------


Now the trick is... You'll want to emphasize the chord tones whenever a chord is being played.. So for example, if a C chord is being played, then try to play C E and G notes.

This doesn't mean go memorize a whole bunch of notes on the guitar. This means, memorize some arpeggio shapes! It's fun this way, because then you can also sweep pick.

So here's a simple C arpeggio you can play over a C chord:

----------------3--8--3-----------------
-------------5-----------5--------------
----------5-----------------5-----------
-------5-----------------------5--------
-3--7-----------------------------7--3--
----------------------------------------


Just learn scale patterns, arpeggio shapes, and the very basics of music theory and you'll be able to write amazing songs, improvise like a god, and w/e else you want!

If you want to go more in depth into theory, by all means.. do it! But uh learn the basics first xD