#1
Hi all, I'm new here so play nice but this is something I've been thinking about a lot.

As much as I love a lot of the new death metal that's coming out these days, don't you miss the old days where the production wasn't so in your face? I don't mean I like shit-sounding music, but when you hear The Bleeding, Symphonies of Sickness and all those old demos in the collection, the imperfections were what made them so human, for want of a better phrase.

I kinda feel that the production, variable and unreliable as it was back then, was the extra instrument on those recordings, and gave it a personality in and of itself.

For instance, I LOVE the new Hour of Penance CD, but it took a while, because it is all so clinically precise (and the drums are just a no-let-up barrage of perfect triggers) that I just couldn't connect with it. But something like Olidous Operettas by The County Medical Examiners (just to think of a modern recording for example), while far from superior on paper, just clicks with me so much better.

I mean I get it - a band isn't going to get their crystal clear digital recording from the mastering suite and then say, "Er, can you fuzz it up a bit, reduce the volume, suck the bass guitar out of the mix, and then put a C90 hiss on it, please?" but still...

So what do you think? Am I just getting old or has the quest for brutal perfection sapped the 'vibe' out of the scene?

Maybe I'm just old.
#2
A good producer understands how to add in a certain "organic" quality, without making the recording sound bad. Things like saturation plug-ins are powerful tools.
#3
You just look at one facet though.

People still use tube amps most often (old).

Peopling use analog fx (old)

Digital FX that emulate analog gear (pseudo-old)

Fender is on the brink of extinction, because people rather buy their 70's strats then new strats, which is kinda ironic in a cynical way.(old)

People still actively form bands with real instruments, despite being brought up in a digital age with computers and synthesizers (old).

People still play Jazz (old).

..and classical (older).
While this is not 100% an answer to your questions, it still shows that people do the same shit in many parts of music as they did it in the "old days".

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jul 25, 2013,
#4
Yes I think you both make very valid points there.

I guess I just don't get as much 'vibe' as I feel from older recordings. Perhaps I should switch to listening to things on vinyl a bit more
#5
Quote by DiminshedtoB

I mean I get it - a band isn't going to get their crystal clear digital recording from the mastering suite and then say, "Er, can you fuzz it up a bit, reduce the volume, suck the bass guitar out of the mix, and then put a C90 hiss on it, please?" but still...

You'd be surprised. One of my favorite bands (Moonsorrow) recorded the drums for their last album digitally, recorded them to an analog tape, and then recorded it back to digital.

Triggers aren't a simple on-off switch, and not everyone quantizes them to a grid after they're recorded. The drums (kick, at least) on the first Cormorant album are triggered, but they used samples from the actual kit, and gave it some dynamic room, so that it's not full blast with even the lightest tap. The triggers just make mixing easier in a case like that.

Ultimately it all comes down to taste, and whether it fits the style. I think this song, this song,
this song, and even this song
in case you don't feel like clicking (which is fine):
*Catamenia - Soror Mystica (melodic black metal)
*Sybreed - Red Nova Ignition ("death wave"- Fear Factory with some gothic stuff)
*Entombed - Left Hand Path (Swedish death metal)
*Dionne Lightwood vs. The Luna Sequence - Visible [remix] (industrial nu metal)

all have production that fits their style well, and adds to the experience, even though they're all recorded, mixed, and mastered very differently. But yeah, I'm getting kind of sick of the monolithic "Century" sound that all modern metal seems to have.
Last edited by Cavalcade at Jul 25, 2013,