#1
any one have this amp? i was looking into getting it i was wondering what it sounds like , i play modern rock but i love versatility in my amps , i like a tight full crunchy distortion any help would be appreciated thanks!
#2
The V3 is a remarkably versatile amp; clearly designed for the high-gain stuff. However, it does plenty of other tones quite well. The look of the amp is obviously inspired by Mesa's Dual and Triple Rectifier amps. Some people have found that the V3 is bass-heavy; that is to say, there is a lot of low end in the amp's tone. Personally, I like that in an amp. It has also been said by people who modify their amps that Carvin amplifiers are biased on the cold side, and by goosing the bias of a V3 a bit, it makes a world of positive difference in the tone.

The V3 is solidly built, and should last you for a very long time. It is also as loud as hell.

The only way for you to know for certain if it is the amp for you is to play one. Only your ears can tell you yes or no.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#3
What do you mean by modern rock? What bands do you want to sound like?

The V3 strikes me as more of an alt metal sort of amp. It's certainly got a lot of power, not really in the style of an amp suited for "rock" (depending on how you define that).
Spin 'round carousel when your horse isn't screwed in.

My band:
Fractured Instinct
(For fans of Death/Groove/Prog Metal)

Ibanez RGA42E
Ibanez S420
LTD H-301
Ibanez RG520
Peavey Predator USA
Douglas Grendel 725
Line 6 Pod HD500X
#5
It should be made clear that there's a pretty big difference between the V3 and V3M. Just so we all stay on the same page when talking about them.
Spin 'round carousel when your horse isn't screwed in.

My band:
Fractured Instinct
(For fans of Death/Groove/Prog Metal)

Ibanez RGA42E
Ibanez S420
LTD H-301
Ibanez RG520
Peavey Predator USA
Douglas Grendel 725
Line 6 Pod HD500X
#7
It happens. For what it's worth, I agree that the V3M could certainly work great as a rock amp. I don't like it personally, but some people must.

The V3 is too "big" sounding to me. It's kind of reminiscent of a Rectifier in a way I can't explain well in words. Just a modern sound, I guess. Not good for "rock".

Which still needs to be defined here of course.
Spin 'round carousel when your horse isn't screwed in.

My band:
Fractured Instinct
(For fans of Death/Groove/Prog Metal)

Ibanez RGA42E
Ibanez S420
LTD H-301
Ibanez RG520
Peavey Predator USA
Douglas Grendel 725
Line 6 Pod HD500X
#8
I had a V3 for a while.

Pros:

- super tight, no flub
- great sustain
- very tweakable, lots of sounds
- fat clean channel, very clear

Cons

- fizzy. Like, foreal.
- lacked "balls," it didn't have a lot of punch in comparison to other high gainers


I liked the amp, but I don't own it anymore so that tells you something. I would recommend it if you are a prog guy or play mostly lead licks, but as far an all out rock amp, I'd say it's not as ideal as a Dual Rec.
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
#9
The V3 is a great amp and its incredible versatile. The complaints over its fizziness can be resolved with a simple re-tubing. They are solidly built and cover a great range of musical styles. Its also relatively inexpensive so its worth checking out in the used market.
Guitars:
-Carvin CS6
-Carvin DC4 w/ Bigsby
-Takamine EG530SC
-Seagull S12QI

Amps:
-Orange Rockerverb 50 MKII
-Carvin V3MC
#10
Quote by Remnest
The V3 is a great amp and its incredible versatile. The complaints over its fizziness can be resolved with a simple re-tubing. They are solidly built and cover a great range of musical styles. Its also relatively inexpensive so its worth checking out in the used market.


Even after a retube, I still had an issue with fizz. it wasn't as bad, but still bad enough that I had to compensate by turning the presence down to almost nothing, which resulted in a muffled sound.

I'm not trying to be argumentative, I just want the TS to understand what he would be getting into. For what its worth, fizz is going to be present in A LOT of high gain amps, and there are tricks to reduce it and in some cases even eliminate it.
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
#11
Quote by dementiacaptain
Even after a retube, I still had an issue with fizz. it wasn't as bad, but still bad enough that I had to compensate by turning the presence down to almost nothing, which resulted in a muffled sound.

I'm not trying to be argumentative, I just want the TS to understand what he would be getting into. For what its worth, fizz is going to be present in A LOT of high gain amps, and there are tricks to reduce it and in some cases even eliminate it.
I literally just got home from a show and one of the dudes we played with had one. I asked him what he did to get such a good tone from it. He retubed it and runs an EQ pedal in the loop for a boost.

It wasn't fizzy at all and was actually hitting pretty close to 5150 territory. I was very impressed since I have had nothing but mediocre experiences with both the V3 and the V3m.
#12
Theres also the plus side that the V3 has a much better clean channel than most high gain amps at that price range
Guitars:
-Carvin CS6
-Carvin DC4 w/ Bigsby
-Takamine EG530SC
-Seagull S12QI

Amps:
-Orange Rockerverb 50 MKII
-Carvin V3MC
#13
I have a V3 and I think it's great. It has really nice high gain, but for crunchy sounds, I think there would be some better options. As far as the fizz goes, I turn down the presence and it turns much smoother. I personally like it with the presence lowered.
HILT!

Where's Waldo?

#14
Quote by ExDementia
I literally just got home from a show and one of the dudes we played with had one. I asked him what he did to get such a good tone from it. He retubed it and runs an EQ pedal in the loop for a boost.

It wasn't fizzy at all and was actually hitting pretty close to 5150 territory. I was very impressed since I have had nothing but mediocre experiences with both the V3 and the V3m.


An EQ in the loop definitely helps, you can cut the high frequencies right where you want to get rid of the fizz. I did that with my V3 and it pretty much eliminated it, but I know some people don't want to have to use an EQ just to get a tone they like. Personally, I think that you have to have a near perfect amp to not want to throw an EQ in the loop, they just open so many tonal options.
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
#15
Quote by Offworld92
What do you mean by modern rock? What bands do you want to sound like?

The V3 strikes me as more of an alt metal sort of amp. It's certainly got a lot of power, not really in the style of an amp suited for "rock" (depending on how you define that).


modern rock like breaking benjamin , 3 days grace , thousand foot krutch kinda sound
#16
Quote by Offworld92
It happens. For what it's worth, I agree that the V3M could certainly work great as a rock amp. I don't like it personally, but some people must.

The V3 is too "big" sounding to me. It's kind of reminiscent of a Rectifier in a way I can't explain well in words. Just a modern sound, I guess. Not good for "rock".

Which still needs to be defined here of course.


? i thought it was just a 50 watt diffrence? between the v3 and v3m
#17
Quote by JazzyJaymes
modern rock like breaking benjamin , 3 days grace , thousand foot krutch kinda sound


Oh yeah, I wouldn't call that rock at all. That's right in the middle of alt metal territory for me. In that case a V3 would be great.

Quote by JazzyJaymes
? i thought it was just a 50 watt diffrence? between the v3 and v3m


Nope, they have totally different characters. Totally different beasts. The V3M has sort of a loose, classic metal feel, whereas the V3 is just another modern high gain head, kind of similar to a JSX. I'd describe it as sort of a blend between a JSX and a Dual Rec. A lot punchier than a JSX, definitely more on the Dual Rec side of the line. But it just doesn't have that signature Dual Rec tone, it's definitely it's own amp.

On that note, I highly recommend a JSX if you can find a good deal on one. I was able to dial in some cool 3DG tones on mine when I had it.
Spin 'round carousel when your horse isn't screwed in.

My band:
Fractured Instinct
(For fans of Death/Groove/Prog Metal)

Ibanez RGA42E
Ibanez S420
LTD H-301
Ibanez RG520
Peavey Predator USA
Douglas Grendel 725
Line 6 Pod HD500X
#18
I own a V3, and buck for buck it's been a great amp. Before it I owned a 6505+ 112 combo, and the V3 definitely owns over the Peavey. It's a very versatile amp, which is no hard task for me since I run almost exclusively on the clean channel and run distortion and OD pedals for the sound I want. That being said, it has a great clean sound for when it's needed. The drive channels have a decent amount of crunch, sound great when you put a decent OD pedal through them. Very classic-rock sounds to be had.

It's still a far cry from the perpetual dream of owning a Triple-Rec, but it's still an awesome amp. After throwing some 6L6's in and cranking up the bias, it's really opened up. You really can't go wrong with it, especially if you like to have a whole range of sounds. It's not quite as "prickly" as I'd like it to be sometimes, but that's probably more of a pickup/EQ issue.
Gear
Taylor 214CE
PRS SE 245, PRS Tremonti Custom
Carvin V3 short stack
Pedals
AMT R2|Morley Mark Tremonti Wah|Mojo Hand Rook|MXR Black Label Chorus|Source Audio EQ|TC-E Flashback, Hall of Fame & Vortex|VFE Enterprise|Way Huge Swollen Pickle
#19
Quote by Offworld92
Oh yeah, I wouldn't call that rock at all. That's right in the middle of alt metal territory for me. In that case a V3 would be great.


Nope, they have totally different characters. Totally different beasts. The V3M has sort of a loose, classic metal feel, whereas the V3 is just another modern high gain head, kind of similar to a JSX. I'd describe it as sort of a blend between a JSX and a Dual Rec. A lot punchier than a JSX, definitely more on the Dual Rec side of the line. But it just doesn't have that signature Dual Rec tone, it's definitely it's own amp.

On that note, I highly recommend a JSX if you can find a good deal on one. I was able to dial in some cool 3DG tones on mine when I had it.


how would you describe the cleans on the jsx? are they better than the 6505 cleans cause i didnt care for those at all :/
#20
Quote by JazzyJaymes
how would you describe the cleans on the jsx? are they better than the 6505 cleans cause i didnt care for those at all :/


lol. Not comparable at all. The JSX has some of the best cleans you can get in a high gain head.
Spin 'round carousel when your horse isn't screwed in.

My band:
Fractured Instinct
(For fans of Death/Groove/Prog Metal)

Ibanez RGA42E
Ibanez S420
LTD H-301
Ibanez RG520
Peavey Predator USA
Douglas Grendel 725
Line 6 Pod HD500X
#21
Quote by Offworld92
Oh yeah, I wouldn't call that rock at all. That's right in the middle of alt metal territory for me. In that case a V3 would be great.


Nope, they have totally different characters. Totally different beasts. The V3M has sort of a loose, classic metal feel, whereas the V3 is just another modern high gain head, kind of similar to a JSX. I'd describe it as sort of a blend between a JSX and a Dual Rec. A lot punchier than a JSX, definitely more on the Dual Rec side of the line. But it just doesn't have that signature Dual Rec tone, it's definitely it's own amp.

On that note, I highly recommend a JSX if you can find a good deal on one. I was able to dial in some cool 3DG tones on mine when I had it.

So you say the V3 is super punchy, but the other guy said it lacks balls. Who's right?
#22
Quote by patriotplayer90
So you say the V3 is super punchy, but the other guy said it lacks balls. Who's right?



Well an amp can have balls and lack punch, and vice versa. The V3 doesn't have a lot of low mid content, where I consider the "balls" to be. What it lacks in low mids, it makes up for in the upper mids, giving it lots of "punch"
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
#23
Quote by dementiacaptain
Well an amp can have balls and lack punch, and vice versa. The V3 doesn't have a lot of low mid content, where I consider the "balls" to be. What it lacks in low mids, it makes up for in the upper mids, giving it lots of "punch"


I currently use a Carvin V3. This is a very accurate description.

It's all a matter of taste. I personally really like it that way. Using the 'thick' mode you can dial more of the lower mids in, but it takes a bit of tweaking. If you use a good boost in front of it, it adds a whole lot of punch to it in a very nice way.
#24
Quote by dementiacaptain
Well an amp can have balls and lack punch, and vice versa. The V3 doesn't have a lot of low mid content, where I consider the "balls" to be. What it lacks in low mids, it makes up for in the upper mids, giving it lots of "punch"

You said it didn't have either earlier
#25
Maybe it's my untrained ears, but the V3's got plenty of mids to work with, especially with the proper OD pedal behind it. I only recently discovered how much you can shape tone with the controls on the top left quad; Bright, Mid Cut and Deep. Tweaking those knobs can make a monstrous difference.
Gear
Taylor 214CE
PRS SE 245, PRS Tremonti Custom
Carvin V3 short stack
Pedals
AMT R2|Morley Mark Tremonti Wah|Mojo Hand Rook|MXR Black Label Chorus|Source Audio EQ|TC-E Flashback, Hall of Fame & Vortex|VFE Enterprise|Way Huge Swollen Pickle