#1
I'm sorry if this is a horrible deja vu moment, which I'm sure it is, but I'm struggling to find an obvious answer to my particular situation so I'd appreciate a little patience :P

In the near future I'll be rebuilding my pedalboard onto a PedalTrain Pro with an 8 way true-bypass loop switching device. Before that true-bypass switcher I'm going to have an Ernie Ball VP-JR volume pedal and Vox V847 wah-wah. With regards to cables involved, my guitar is transmitted wirelessly to a Line 6 G30, but then there are 3 other cables (minimum of 5m/16ft each) going from the board to my amp for using the FX loop.

Will a buffer help maintain my tone? My current pedalboard set-up is pretty hopeless, probably about 10m of mediocre standard cable and no switching system so it's always running through it all, and it's really noisy when you listen close as well as losing tone. Obviously a buffer would help my current situation, but would it be necessary when I rebuild?

With an 8 way true-bypass switcher, would it still be necessary to keep the signal strong and tone crisp and clear? Also, as there are 3 cables going to and from the board and the amp, where is the best place to put the buffer if needed? I've heard a buffer should go towards the start of a chain, possibly after a wah-wah pedal, but would I then need another before each run of cable, or will the one buffer maintain the tone through the whole system?

Sorry if I'm being really thick, can't find an obvious answer in language I can understand anywhere else! Thanks
PRS SE Chris Robertson
PRS SE EG
PRS SE Angelus Custom
Yamaha SF1000 (Both of 'em)

Laney L20H Lionheart
Marshall 1936 w/ Eminence

Rather large pedalboard..
#2
The G30 will function as a line driver/buffer, and will drive everything in the signal chain after it (i.e., the loops you have selected). You don't need to add a buffer pedal. As you suspected, you probably wouldn't need one with that switching system anyway, the whole point of it is to keep the loops short.
#3
Really? I had no idea the G30 would act as a buffer, that's great! So I wouldn't even need one after the wah-wah if the G30 is strong enough?
PRS SE Chris Robertson
PRS SE EG
PRS SE Angelus Custom
Yamaha SF1000 (Both of 'em)

Laney L20H Lionheart
Marshall 1936 w/ Eminence

Rather large pedalboard..
#4
Quote by makutoid
Will a buffer help maintain my tone?


from what i know, a buffer changes the impedance of the signal so the signal is better preserved. the more cable you run through the more you'll want a buffering system. you'll notice the difference mostly in the high mids to highs freq range the most.

now will this help you maintain your current tone? probably not, your tone will most likely sound more harsh (unless you already have a buffered pedal in your chain) because you'll be getting more harsh freq to the amp. some people complain about this, but some just change some settings on the amp and pedals and are happy.

Quote by makutoid
Obviously a buffer would help my current situation, but would it be necessary when I rebuild? With an 8 way true-bypass switcher, would it still be necessary to keep the signal strong and tone crisp and clear?


run a buffer pedal before the switching system. also, the switching system should keep your signal path short when running through the pedals but those long 16' ft cords you talk about are why you'd need a buffer

Quote by makutoid
Also, as there are 3 cables going to and from the board and the amp, where is the best place to put the buffer if needed? I've heard a buffer should go towards the start of a chain, possibly after a wah-wah pedal, but would I then need another before each run of cable, or will the one buffer maintain the tone through the whole system?


place the buffer at the beginning of the chain. from what i understand it effects the 'whole system'
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#5
It's not a question of being strong enough. There are two reasons to use a buffer pedal: preventing tone loss over long cable runs, and preventing unpleasant interactions between pedals.

Almost any pedal (while it's switched on) or active system (like a wireless) will serve to drive cable runs, and will drive any reasonable length of cable. So that's why your G30 negates your need for a buffer. A line driver/buffer drives everything after it, right up to the amp. So there is no need to have a redundant buffer just to drive your pedals, regardless of how many you have or what they are.

For preventing interactions, a lot of people need a buffer after a wah because they'll often cause weird interactions and tone loss with other pedals, usually fuzzes. If you haven't had this problem before, there's no reason to introduce a solution by buying a buffer.
#6
Thanks guys, lots of help to someone who's never looked into a buffer before, I believe I get it now :P I'll have a play with the wah later and see what happens, I don't get to mess with it much apart from with the band so don't get much quiet time to listen to the subtle noises etc.

Cheers!!
PRS SE Chris Robertson
PRS SE EG
PRS SE Angelus Custom
Yamaha SF1000 (Both of 'em)

Laney L20H Lionheart
Marshall 1936 w/ Eminence

Rather large pedalboard..