#1
Hey guys. So I have this ESP Eclipse standard series, you know, the type before their ass were sued by Gibson for duplicating their les paul design with the 4 pot design and the 3 way switch. The thing is an absolute beauty, but I think I have done something really bad.

The ESP is equipped with a couple of EMG's, 60 in the neck and 81 in the bridge. I googled some guides on EMG for getting the best sound out of them, and discovered that there were in fact a simple mod called the 18v mod, that would make the top end more articulate and allow more headroom in the pickups. Naturally, I had to try it.


The first thing I did was the reversible version, like this one:
[forbidden link]

I however did it wrong. The cables were switched up for me, so the polarity were ultimately switched, meaning I sent 18 volts the wrong way into the emgs. Now when I try to reverse the mod by simply unplugging the ghetto cabling I created, the sound is dull and the ouput is insanely low.

It does not matter if I take the battery out, leaving it in or even swapping the battery with a new one, the ouput remains the same in a dull and weak output.

If I crank the input on my DI I get a sound coming from the guitar, and both of the volume knobs work, as well as the tone knobs. The three way switch on the guitar works as well.

I have checked every cable in the guitar cavity and everything seems to fit snuggly, no loose cables or anything. I think I have simply fried the preamp in the pickups, but I created this thread as a last hope. Do either of you know of a similar problem and how to fix it?

If it cannot get fixed, I think I would rather invest in a couple of james hetfield signature EMG's, as I've read (haven't actually heard them myself) that they improve upon the EMG's compressed and digital sound.
#4
I think you over cooked them. 9v X 2 the wrong way? Yep the little red thing should have popped. Try a Fulltone 2 and see if any thing normal comes out.
#5
I doubt you fried them. EMGs sound like that when they don't get any voltage. Plus there's a very good chance the folks at EMG covered their bases an included polarity protection. You can power EMGs with up to 27v do their polarity protection will AT LEAST protect up to that but probably protects to at least 50v.

Just rewire it with 9v and make sure the pickups are getting the juice. If so add another battery and just leave it at 18v.
#6
Quote by Invader Jim
I doubt you fried them. EMGs sound like that when they don't get any voltage. Plus there's a very good chance the folks at EMG covered their bases an included polarity protection. You can power EMGs with up to 27v do their polarity protection will AT LEAST protect up to that but probably protects to at least 50v.

Just rewire it with 9v and make sure the pickups are getting the juice. If so add another battery and just leave it at 18v.


So there is such a thing as polarity protection? I would certainly hope such a thing existed, considering the fact that a pair of emg's cost a premium price, added with the well known fact that us guitarist aren't necessarily considered to be as bright as we intend us ourselves to be.


All the volume, tone and switch knobs work perfectly. I have tried with other batteries, and when I connect the batteries it makes sort of a clicking sound, meaning they do get connection with something.

Here's the thing though, if I connect two 9v in series I got no sound at all, but when I connect a single 9 volt, I do get the same sound as not connecting a battery at all. From my extensive knowledge of working with electronics, which is to say that I once disassembled a calculator in 8th grade, I think it does in fact connect with "something".

I have now tried to disconnect both the pickups, as well as checking every wire in the guitar. Everything seems flawless. I read that it could be a problem with a cable coming loose from the stereo jack where you plug in the guitar, but there doesn't seem to be a cable missing from it either. There are 3 cables connected to the cable jack, which should be correct.


I think I either have to send this guitar to a tech, or try new pickups. Anyone tried the hetfield signature emg's? I haven't found a store that would let me try them yet, since noone have imported them, which of course could be for a reason.
#7
Is the stereo jack wired up correctly? There are 3 connections: tip, ring, and sleeve. In a normal guitar there is only the tip and sleeve connections. Sleeve is ground and tip is "hot" (I don't like using that word in this context). Stereo jacks are the same but the negative lead of the battery goes to the ring connection. The reason why is that when you put a mono plug into a stereo jack, the ring and sleeve connections get shorted together. So what is going on here is the plug and jack are being used as a switch to connect the battery negative wire to ground.

If you can't get it straightened out I'd suggest having a tech look at it, preferrably someone who wouldn't charge you unless they get it to work.

As for polarity protection:
http://www.geofex.com/article_folders/mosswitch/mosswitch.htm

That article is mainly about a more advanced type of protection but the basic types used by everyone are there. All his articles are good reads.
#8
Quote by Invader Jim
Is the stereo jack wired up correctly? There are 3 connections: tip, ring, and sleeve. In a normal guitar there is only the tip and sleeve connections. Sleeve is ground and tip is "hot" (I don't like using that word in this context). Stereo jacks are the same but the negative lead of the battery goes to the ring connection. The reason why is that when you put a mono plug into a stereo jack, the ring and sleeve connections get shorted together. So what is going on here is the plug and jack are being used as a switch to connect the battery negative wire to ground.

If you can't get it straightened out I'd suggest having a tech look at it, preferrably someone who wouldn't charge you unless they get it to work.

As for polarity protection:
http://www.geofex.com/article_folders/mosswitch/mosswitch.htm

That article is mainly about a more advanced type of protection but the basic types used by everyone are there. All his articles are good reads.


There are 3 cables connected to the stereo jack, but the main feed is only 2 cables, meaning 1 of the cables are split into two soldered spots on the stereo jack.

I believe a picture would explain it a lot better than my incompetent words, so I will update this post with pictures when I get home from work later today.

Thanks a lot for the replies, guys.