#1
So I've been learning some theory... I got to the intervals part of it, I see how it works and such. I don't remember each interval by heart, though I'll try. I'm also working on my sight reading which is improving. But as far as the intervals go, I'm sure the hearing is the more important part, which I work on as well too.

But I guess I'm asking for some help with what to study next, I know the Circ Of 5ths and each note in each major/minor scale. I try and consciously apply that to my random jamming and soloing.

What do you guys suggest I learn now? I read the FAQ on theory here, but if I asked for anything specifically it'd be on harmony, a good in-depth explanation with some solid examples.
#2
What would you like to achieve through learning music theory? How do you think it will help you?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#3
Chord construction

Edit: And chord progressions I.E how to make them
Gear:
Dean RC7X (Bareknuckle Coldsweat pickups)
Ibanez Rg2570Z (Bareknuckle Juggernaughts)
Schecter KM-6
Schecter Hellraiser Hybrid 7 String
Engl Powerball II
Orange PPC412
Line 6 Pod HD500X
Last edited by amonamarthmetal at Jul 27, 2013,
#4
Quote by AlanHB
What would you like to achieve through learning music theory? How do you think it will help you?


To help me compose music for sure. Also to be able to understand what's going on and why, they all say when you know theory that you're able to know how to make what you want to play sound a certain way... that's sick, I need that ability.

I think it would help me with those areas, as well as even computer producing.

Quote by amonamarthmetal
Chord construction

Edit: And chord progressions I.E how to make them


I'm familiar with this, but how far deep should I go? I mean I have a chord formula thing I look at, I practice making my own and such... nvm I think I'm slacking here a little, I'll definitely study construction more.
#5
I assume you know the intervals of the major scale. (I don't give a shit if you got the names down, as the main thing is actually being able to know them [meaning 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, & 7].) So, take those and play them. Play 1 (it doesn't matter what note you pick as 1 or the tonic, as long as you are consistent with the rest of the intervals), then the 2nd interval; hear the sound that moving from the 1st to the 2nd makes. Then, go from 1 to 3. And so on. Once you get down the sound of 1 to 7, then do 2 to 3 and move through until it until you're playing 2 to 1. Go through the entire major scale like that. Do this a lot; until you're so sick of it that you can't and then do it a bit more.
Then, repeat the same thing with the intervals of the natural minor scale (1, 2, b3, 4, 5, b6, & b7).

That's the best way to hear what moving from one interval to another interval sounds like -- by getting the sounds so ingrained into your ear that you know them by sound every time.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Jul 28, 2013,
#6
Willy Wonka: This is Music Theory.
Grandpa Joe: It's a scale.
Willy Wonka: No, it's Music Theory. A scale can only go up and down, but Music Theory can go sideways, and slantways, and longways, and backways...
Charlie Bucket: And frontways?
Willy Wonka: ...and squareways, and front ways, and any other ways that you can think of. It can take you to any room in the whole factory just by pressing one of these buttons. Any of these buttons. Just press a button, and *zing*! You're off.
modes are a social construct
#7
Quote by Hail
Willy Wonka: This is Music Theory.
Grandpa Joe: It's a scale.
Willy Wonka: No, it's Music Theory. A scale can only go up and down, but Music Theory can go sideways, and slantways, and longways, and backways...
Charlie Bucket: And frontways?
Willy Wonka: ...and squareways, and front ways, and any other ways that you can think of. It can take you to any room in the whole factory just by pressing one of these buttons. Any of these buttons. Just press a button, and *zing*! You're off.


This might be the greatest thing I've ever read.
#8
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
I assume you know the intervals of the major scale. (I don't give a shit if you got the names down, as the main thing is actually being able to know them [meaning 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, & 7].) So, take those and play them. Play 1 (it doesn't matter what note you pick as 1 or the tonic, as long as you are consistent with the rest of the intervals), then the 2nd interval; hear the sound that moving from the 1st to the 2nd makes. Then, go from 1 to 3. And so on. Once you get down the sound of 1 to 7, then do 2 to 3 and move through until it until you're playing 2 to 1. Go through the entire major scale like that. Do this a lot; until you're so sick of it that you can't and then do it a bit more.
Then, repeat the same thing with the intervals of the natural minor scale (1, 2, b3, 4, 5, b6, & b7).

That's the best way to hear what moving from one interval to another interval sounds like -- by getting the sounds so ingrained into your ear that you know them by sound every time.


I like this method. Thank you, will do.
#9
Quote by Hail
Willy Wonka: This is Music Theory.
Grandpa Joe: It's a scale.
Willy Wonka: No, it's Music Theory. A scale can only go up and down, but Music Theory can go sideways, and slantways, and longways, and backways...
Charlie Bucket: And frontways?
Willy Wonka: ...and squareways, and front ways, and any other ways that you can think of. It can take you to any room in the whole factory just by pressing one of these buttons. Any of these buttons. Just press a button, and *zing*! You're off.


You just perfectly summed up what I want to say to almost every new guitarist I meet who is obsessed with scale runs.
#10
Quote by Hail
Willy Wonka: This is Music Theory.
Grandpa Joe: It's a scale.
Willy Wonka: No, it's Music Theory. A scale can only go up and down, but Music Theory can go sideways, and slantways, and longways, and backways...
Charlie Bucket: And frontways?
Willy Wonka: ...and squareways, and front ways, and any other ways that you can think of. It can take you to any room in the whole factory just by pressing one of these buttons. Any of these buttons. Just press a button, and *zing*! You're off.


Well you coulda told me that when I first started learning the basics of guitar 3 years back I thought theory was just scales and sight reading, and I never got the latter part down. Now I know better (thanks to Josh Urban's Crusades)
Theory is just...wow. I'm getting a bit over my head by trying to learn so much w/o formal educators

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My motto: Play what the song needs you to play!
#11
Quote by Hail
Willy Wonka: This is Music Theory.
Grandpa Joe: It's a scale.
Willy Wonka: No, it's Music Theory. A scale can only go up and down, but Music Theory can go sideways, and slantways, and longways, and backways...
Charlie Bucket: And frontways?
Willy Wonka: ...and squareways, and front ways, and any other ways that you can think of. It can take you to any room in the whole factory just by pressing one of these buttons. Any of these buttons. Just press a button, and *zing*! You're off.


FREEDOM.... Freeedommmm yeeaa freedom
#12
Quote by Fourfourforever
FREEDOM.... Freeedommmm yeeaa freedom



Yeah mannnn!
Just another Sheep in the design of the Almighty Machine.


-GEAR-
Gibson 60s Les Paul Tribute (Sunburst)
1999 Ibanez RG470 (TitaniumIce-MIJ)
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Peavey 6505+
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#13
Great thread. Valuable information along with clever, thought changing humor.
#14
I think that functional harmony and the study of counterpoint are two of the most important aspects of music theory to master. It takes a long time to learn the two but it is definitely worth the trouble. Also, rudimentary knowledge of the overtone series can really help in understanding more advanced forms of analysis (phrase analysis and schenkerian analysis)