#2
Sup, I read the article.

If I had a chord progression that went Am7 - D7 - Gmaj7 how do you propose to solo over this?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#3
Number of ways, the most obvious is G major throughout.

A dorian over Am
D mixolydian over D
G ionian over G

They're all contained in the one scale so you shouldn't have to change scales if you don't want.

If you wanted to get more complex, you could play some form of altered scale over the D7 and a variation of a major mode over G. Jazzers tends to play lydian over major chords but as that G is the tonic, I doubt it will work that well.

In short, stick with G major throughout and accentuate the chord tones when you can.
#4
Thanks for the explanation mate. Why refer to modes if they offer no benefit or difference in your example?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#6
^^^ The examples you gave were single chords, and most songs aren't single chords. I can only see it spreading this useless application of modes as you've explained above.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#7
Right okay.

I referenced chords with the formulas, if we had a chord with a b2, we would not play the major scale because it doesn't have a b2. We would play the phrygian mode of that scale.

In C major that would be E phrygian.

You need to understand the formulas for chords and modes, and also understand chord construction in order to understand what I mean. This is not a useless application if you know what the numbers mean.

edit: What I mean by b2 is in reference to that note. So if I say b2 in reference to C, I mean Db (because it is the 2nd and then flattened)

Therefore a chord with a b2 would NOT work over C major because C major does not contain the flat 2.

However, E phrygian (The 3rd mode of C major) DOES contain a b2nd and therefore is suitable for this.

E phrygian contains an F which is a b2nd. And that's why I use modes to explain it.
Last edited by professorlamp at Jul 28, 2013,
#8
Oh you didn't....
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#9
Well, this will be fun!
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

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#11
I'm not following TS. If the chords in Alan's example fit perfectly in the key of G major & all of the scales you say you should play over the individual chords have the same notes then what makes them different? I'm new to modes so forgive me if I'm missing something...
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#13
Alan was the first to comment. Shouldn't he just have closed this in the first place for advertising?
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#14
Quote by amonamarthmetal
Alan was the first to comment. Shouldn't he just have closed this in the first place for advertising?


It is advertising but I'm not trying to advertise, just thought I'd share the wealth. How is it any different to reading a lesson on UG really?
#15
Quote by amonamarthmetal
Alan was the first to comment. Shouldn't he just have closed this in the first place for advertising?


I only really opt to ban for advertising if the TS has signed up to this site purely to direct traffic elsewhere. It's pretty clear that this isnt the case here and yes, I would prefer that the article is discussed here rather than being put on the UG site in its current state.

And TS, playing E phrygian in the key or C major is just playing the C major scale. Why are you over complicating this?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#17
Perhaps you should amend the article to explain use of modal inspired scales over non-diatonic chords.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#18
^^^ I guess I'll start it off.

Quote by J-Dawg158
I'm not following TS. If the chords in Alan's example fit perfectly in the key of G major & all of the scales you say you should play over the individual chords have the same notes then what makes them different? I'm new to modes so forgive me if I'm missing something...


J-Dawg, this is a great question. It is great because a lot of people don't ask this question and end up using the method proposed, claiming they "know modes" but actually playing the major or minor scales with no variation. Whilst one can argue that it "opens you to a new mindset", unfortunately what really matters in the end is how it sounds, and it sounds exactly the same (because it is).

I was hoping that the article would go in the following direction:

Over diatonic progressions your best/easiest option is to play the minor or major scale linked to the key, emphasising chord tones. Due to their very nature diatonic progressions consist of chords that are entirely made up of notes that are shared with the key, so there is no need to change the notes to avoid changes.

However, not all progressions are diatonic. In these cases we can employ accidentals.

For example if we have the progression Am7 D7 Gmaj7, these chords are all diatonic to the key of G so the G major scale is appropriate if you do not want to employ accidentals.

But lets just change that progression a little. I'm going to add a bVII so our new progression is Am7 D7 Gmaj7 F G. So oh no we have an F there, which doesn't share all the notes with the G major scale. What do I do?

Well firstly lets play through it. Is the song still resolving to G? Sure is. So we're still in the key of G but there's a chord that doesn't share all the notes with G. How do we find the best of both worlds.

The G major scale has the following notes G A B C D E F#

An F chord has the following notes F A C. So it really does have something in common with the G major scale, it has two notes. We just need to accommodate for that pesky F somehow.

So we play a G major scale with an extra F. It's really best to avoid the F# too, as this creates a b2 on the chord, which isn't always pleasing to the ear.

So over that F chord we'll play these notes G A B C D E F - a G major scale with a b7.

And you know what? This scale shares the same notes/formulae with a mode. The G mixolydian mode has these notes.

So you could say that you play G mixolydian mode over the F chord.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#19
Quote by sweetdude3000
I wonder why Guthrie Govan is all about shapes and modes while people deride thrm here

He isn't. He's all about playing by ear.
#20
Quote by sweetdude3000
I wonder why Guthrie Govan is all about shapes and modes while people deride thrm here


No, he isn't. He focuses more on listening to what you're playing and how to get what you hear in your head onto the fretboard, the keys, the holes, whatever instead.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZlkGcFbdPJc
#21
I'm speaking about his book. He talks about the modes and their flavours and gives endless shapes. Otherwise he does talk about the sounds.
#22
Quote by sweetdude3000
I'm speaking about his book. He talks about the modes and their flavours and gives endless shapes. Otherwise he does talk about the sounds.

I don't think most people here have a problem with using modes to represent accidentals or what-have-you as long as you have the ear to back it up and it works for you. That's the thing about Guthrie: he's been learning by ear since age 3. He intuitively understands music and uses these mechanisms as a way to visualize it.