#1
my new guitar have a high action when it arrived so when i tried to lower the tremolo the lower fret don't make any sound or they will chock when i bend them so i tighten the truss rod and i changed the strings and it still the same everything was setup perfect in this guitar even the tuning except the action.
#2
Sounds like you have absolutely no experience or knowledge in what you're doing. No offense, but the only realistic thing to do is find a guitar tech.
"Air created the greenness. And once you've got something, that leads to otherness." - Karl Pilkington.
#3
Quote by Lavatain
Sounds like you have absolutely no experience or knowledge in what you're doing. No offense, but the only realistic thing to do is find a guitar tech.

well duh that's why i'm asking for help i don't wanna take it to a tech i wanna do it my self and if you have enough experience you would know the problem no offense.
#4
Quote by guitarmolester
well duh that's why i'm asking for help i don't wanna take it to a tech i wanna do it my self and if you have enough experience you would know the problem no offense.

If I had the guitar in my hands I could fix it for sure. It just sounds like you've never even attempted this before and are going about it the wrong way.

In any case, seeing as you want to do it on your own, it sounds like you need to loosen the truss rod, not tighten it. Loosen it till there's no pressure in what you're turning. Then tighten it just so you're getting a bit of resistance and stop. This will make the truss rod catch so you don't end up warping the neck in the long run.

After this your neck should be straight or with slight curve upwards. If it's way too much then you slowly tighten the truss rod until the neck's almost straight. From here you need to adjust the action. Now, you have a tremolo, so you want your strings to be really slack so that the tremolo dips into the body. Only move the tremolo posts when the strings are slack like this, or you will blunt the knife edges on your tremolo which will make it near useless. Trust me on that one, I learned like that on one of my guitars.

You'll need to keep adjusting the tremolo posts bit by bit and retuning to pitch after every adjust until it's perfect. You don't want to blunt those knife edges.

I hope this large wall of text helps, as you requested. If all else fails give this a try. If that fails, then you need to take it to a tech.
"Air created the greenness. And once you've got something, that leads to otherness." - Karl Pilkington.
#5
Quote by Lavatain
If I had the guitar in my hands I could fix it for sure. It just sounds like you've never even attempted this before and are going about it the wrong way.

In any case, seeing as you want to do it on your own, it sounds like you need to loosen the truss rod, not tighten it. Loosen it till there's no pressure in what you're turning. Then tighten it just so you're getting a bit of resistance and stop. This will make the truss rod catch so you don't end up warping the neck in the long run.

After this your neck should be straight or with slight curve upwards. If it's way too much then you slowly tighten the truss rod until the neck's almost straight. From here you need to adjust the action. Now, you have a tremolo, so you want your strings to be really slack so that the tremolo dips into the body. Only move the tremolo posts when the strings are slack like this, or you will blunt the knife edges on your tremolo which will make it near useless. Trust me on that one, I learned like that on one of my guitars.

You'll need to keep adjusting the tremolo posts bit by bit and retuning to pitch after every adjust until it's perfect. You don't want to blunt those knife edges.

I hope this large wall of text helps, as you requested. If all else fails give this a try. If that fails, then you need to take it to a tech.

well i already did that the problem is if i lower the tremolo any farther the low fret will chock but thanks for your post.
#6
Quote by guitarmolester
well i already did that the problem is if i lower the tremolo any farther the low fret will chock but thanks for your post.

That's why I said to loosen the truss rod. That will bring the lower frets back up so they aren't dying out on the higher frets.
"Air created the greenness. And once you've got something, that leads to otherness." - Karl Pilkington.
#7
Quote by Lavatain
That's why I said to loosen the truss rod. That will bring the lower frets back up so they aren't dying out on the higher frets.

well i did that and when i fret the first and the last fret the gab on the 7th is just about right I'm starting to think i have a high fret.
#8
Quote by guitarmolester
well i did that and when i fret the first and the last fret the gab on the 7th is just about right I'm starting to think i have a high fret.

Oh okay, that is possible yes. If it's a certain fret that's doing it then yeah. But if it's a load of frets then you may not have a large enough gap for the relief. The tools to fix a high fret will be more expensive than taking it to a tech if that is the case.
"Air created the greenness. And once you've got something, that leads to otherness." - Karl Pilkington.
#9
Quote by Lavatain
Oh okay, that is possible yes. If it's a certain fret that's doing it then yeah. But if it's a load of frets then you may not have a large enough gap for the relief. The tools to fix a high fret will be more expensive than taking it to a tech if that is the case.

OK thanks a lot dude you have been a big help.
#10
Quote by guitarmolester
OK thanks a lot dude you have been a big help.

No worries, friend. I hope you all the best
"Air created the greenness. And once you've got something, that leads to otherness." - Karl Pilkington.
#11
Quote by guitarmolester
my new guitar have a high action when it arrived so when i tried to lower the tremolo the lower fret don't make any sound or they will chock when i bend them so i tighten the truss rod and i changed the strings and it still the same everything was setup perfect in this guitar even the tuning except the action.


There can be a lot of things causing this.
One, you need to make sure your frets are level. A good 18" stainless steel straight edge will show you what's high and what's low generally. A shorter three or four-inch "rocker" (or even a newish credit card) will show you which frets among three or four are too high or low.

If you're absolutely positive that your frets are level (and that you don't have some form of the "Gibson Hump" down around the 15th/16th frets), then you have to consider the nut. A nut with slots that are cut too high will give you buzzing frets when you try to lower the bridge, but the frets that will buzz are the ones up around the 15th fret and above. If the nut is cut too low, then the lower frets (the first five) will buzz and nothing from there on will sound right.

You don't tighten the truss rod at random -- you'll simply screw things up. If you don't know why you're doing it, you don't touch it. ONLY AFTER you've confirmed you have level frets and that your nut is cut properly (it's entirely possible to get one that's not, even on a brand new guitar) do you check the relief. You want to make sure you don't have back bow on the guitar, but a guitar neck can be flat or have a slight amount of relief (if none of this is making sense to you, you need either a book or a tech). Get a capo and put it at the first fret. Hold the string down on the 17th fret. Check for space under the string at the 7th fret. There may be some, but there shouldn't be much. If you've got a brand new deck of playing cards, pull one out and try to slide it under the string at the 7th fret. If the card lifts the string, you may want to dial in just a bit of relief.

It's not within the scope of a forum to walk you through a setup. Pick up a book called "How to make your electric guitar play great" by Dan Erlewine. It'll tell you what you need to know. Otherwise, if you know a GOOD tech, you should have the guitar set up correctly. He'll have the tools necessary to tell you what you need to know about your guitar.
#12
Quote by dspellman
There can be a lot of things causing this.
One, you need to make sure your frets are level. A good 18" stainless steel straight edge will show you what's high and what's low generally. A shorter three or four-inch "rocker" (or even a newish credit card) will show you which frets among three or four are too high or low.

If you're absolutely positive that your frets are level (and that you don't have some form of the "Gibson Hump" down around the 15th/16th frets), then you have to consider the nut. A nut with slots that are cut too high will give you buzzing frets when you try to lower the bridge, but the frets that will buzz are the ones up around the 15th fret and above. If the nut is cut too low, then the lower frets (the first five) will buzz and nothing from there on will sound right.

You don't tighten the truss rod at random -- you'll simply screw things up. If you don't know why you're doing it, you don't touch it. ONLY AFTER you've confirmed you have level frets and that your nut is cut properly (it's entirely possible to get one that's not, even on a brand new guitar) do you check the relief. You want to make sure you don't have back bow on the guitar, but a guitar neck can be flat or have a slight amount of relief (if none of this is making sense to you, you need either a book or a tech). Get a capo and put it at the first fret. Hold the string down on the 17th fret. Check for space under the string at the 7th fret. There may be some, but there shouldn't be much. If you've got a brand new deck of playing cards, pull one out and try to slide it under the string at the 7th fret. If the card lifts the string, you may want to dial in just a bit of relief.

It's not within the scope of a forum to walk you through a setup. Pick up a book called "How to make your electric guitar play great" by Dan Erlewine. It'll tell you what you need to know. Otherwise, if you know a GOOD tech, you should have the guitar set up correctly. He'll have the tools necessary to tell you what you need to know about your guitar.

thank you so much for the info and i'm reading the book it's great!
#13
Yeah, you need a guitar tech
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