#1
I am a older guy and the fingers are not what they used to be, along with many things. I am thinking that if i get a guitar with a wider neck, I might be able to play better. i have a classical but the action is too high to do much good.

Any thoughts and suggestions.

DW
#2
I personally think a wider neck will make it more difficult to play. The reason your classical guitar is difficult to play could be a combination of the high action and the wider neck. Maybe look into an acoustic with low action or a classical with lower action and less wide/ acoustic neck. Just fyi, sizes of necks on nylon string guitars can vary dramatically from model to model.
Originally posted by arrrgg
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#3
Makes perfect sense to me! I got my classical back in the day because I had trouble making chord shapes on a "standard" size neck. The action wasn't too high at all on mine. Nylon strings can also be easier to fret on too. Get a luthier to drop that action and try it again.
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#4
I also have old crappy hands now, and find wider necks simply mean you have to stretch further.
Might be time to go buy a nice OO or OOO, nice low setup with some light strings. Cheers
#5
Quote by azledon
I am a older guy and the fingers are not what they used to be, along with many things. I am thinking that if i get a guitar with a wider neck, I might be able to play better. i have a classical but the action is too high to do much good.

Any thoughts and suggestions.

DW
You left out (?) the part about what you were playing now, maybe. You mention a classical, is that an additional guitar?

It is possible to confuse a problem in technique, with the need for a wider neck. If you're not getting your fingers perpendicular to the fret board when playing, you'll mute adjacent strings. So, the wrist needs to be lower and forward under the neck to get your fingers into the right geometry.

The action of a classical guitar is high out of necessity. However, that doesn't mean the action can't be too high. You'd have to measure it at the 12th fret, and scoot us that number before we can make any call on the issue.

I play 12 string most of the time. Those necks are close to 1 7/8" wide. I have a little trouble adjusting to the standard 1 11/16" of my 6 strings, at least in the short term. However you can't do tricks like the "Hendrix grip", or overlap your thumb over the fret board with those very wide necks.

You're probably going to have to try various guitars, and examine your technique before making your decision.

There are a lot of variables going on. For example, the size of your hands, the gauge of strings you use, how well the guitar is set up, the size of the body, and oh yeah, the width of the neck.

The only thing I could offer at this point, is to say the nylon strung guitar requires less hand strength to play. And I don't know if hand strength is a problem either.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 29, 2013,
#6
i find that to an extent a wider neck is easier to play, but depending on your finger sizes, when you get too wide, it may again become a challenge. is your plan to stick with classcial or are you considering switching to a steel string guitar?
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#7
I am considering buying up and am wondering if some acoustic steel strings would be better for me. My hands are not small nor are they large. I do strength building with my left hand and it helps. Does a Martin neck play more comfortabley than a Taylor oR Gibson neck. I am not planning on sticking with a classical, I have an electric and a low end acoustic that is difficult at times.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Thank you very much for your input.

DW
#8
If you have a cheapish classical it may have a very high action making it difficult to play, especially barre chords. Also if you want to play pop and rock then a classical is probably not the best - but really depends what you want to do. If you do want to play "pop" however would recommend a steel string but maybe go up to an intermediate price and ensure when you buy there is a low enough action or/and have a good set up. Also consider initially having a set up with lower gauge strings as these will be easier on your fretting hand. Would personally recommend Martin but that is my ear! - I have biggish hands and have no problem with Martin although as mentioned above there is technique involved. Used to have problems with open A all three fingers (big hands) but for a long time i have played A with one finger bent back at the first knuckle.
Last edited by g1jammer at Jul 30, 2013,
#9
It depends, really. A twelve-string set up as a six can give you more room for movement and that helps tired joints by means of not having to cram your fingers and make smaller movements which are more straining.

But if your hands are small, perhaps get a slightly heavier gauge (not too heavy; just not so light that the strings come up with your fingers), and a lower action?
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#10
not all martin necks are the same width or shape. i have small hands, but i do best with wider necks from 1 13/16" at the nut to 1 7/8", and 1 3/4" is okay. i dislike the most common nut width of 1 11/15", as it's too slim for me and shows me down or even gives me cramping in my fingers when played for long. my fretting hand is more comfortable when playing a neck with a rounded profile, not a U or D or V shape. even fingerboard radius can make a difference.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#11
Hey P' so are the Martin D series the widest - these are the ones I was referring to? I know I could look up but I figured you would know!
Last edited by g1jammer at Jul 30, 2013,
#12
D isn't a series - it stands for dread. and most - not all - have narrower nuts. the martin 000s, 00s and 0s have wider nuts. this is where i ask your budget - there are some companies like recording king and blueridge that make less expensive, good quality martin clones. there's also eastman, whose mid to higher end guitars are very nice. and at around $425, the seagull original S6 has a nice fat neck.

martin makes some super nice dreads, but speaking as an aging guitarist, a smaller body can be a lot more comfortable.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!