#1
Just picked this up off Craigslist. I didn't know it existed until yesterday. It's a 1988 Gibson WRC made in the USA. It was designed by Wayne Charvel and supposed to be gibson's answer to the super strat. Jackson sued them after they made about 600 and Gibson pulled the plug on the guitar.

Plays great!






#2
Nice! Reminds me of a Ferarri. HSOYNGD! (Happy shredding on your new guitar day!)
Caution:
This post may contain my opinion and/or inaccurate information.

Current Rig:
2006 PRS CE-24
Mesa/Boogie Mark V
Voltage S212 w/ V30's
Strymon Timeline
CMATMods Signa Drive
TC Electronics Corona & Hall of Fame
#3
That's got one of those weird behind the nut locking nuts!

So very '80s lookin', HNGD!
"Air created the greenness. And once you've got something, that leads to otherness." - Karl Pilkington.
#4
Quote by Lavatain
That's got one of those weird behind the nut locking nuts!


Kahler String Lock and trem.
I've got several guitars with Kahlers, but all of them have a "Fliplock" string lock behind the nut:

#5
I remember those!

HNGD!
It's an opinion. It's subjective. And I'm right, anyway.
#6
Wow cool guitar an some interesting history on it. What grounds would Jackson have to sue Gibson though? Just Cuz Wayne Charvel designed it?
Jackson DK2
1962 Fender Esquire
PEAVEY JSX 212
PEAVEY 6505+ 112
#7
I'm not sure how or why they sued them. That is just what the Gibson WRC wiki page said.
#8
nice
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#10
Really nice! How does it sound?
Skip the username, call me Billy
Last edited by aerosmithfan95 at Jul 30, 2013,
#11
It sounds great. Has a passive emg in the bridge I believe. I actually think it sounds better clean than distorted. Can get a lot of different tones from it with all of the different configurations. It is not the best sounding guitar in the world, but more of a jack of all trades.
#12
Quote by UFC on VHS
Wow cool guitar an some interesting history on it. What grounds would Jackson have to sue Gibson though? Just Cuz Wayne Charvel designed it?


When Wayne Charvel sold his company to Grover Jackson, the sale included the name "Charvel." Gibson originally advertised and marketed their guitar as a "Wayne Charvel" model and the ads stated in bold print "Wayne Charvel is no longer involved with or associated with Charvel Guitars." The folks at Jackson were understandably concerned, as some people might interpret that statement to mean that guitars sold with the "Charvel" name and trademark were somehow not "true" Charvel guitars. So the lawsuit was over the name; not the guitar.

I remember that guitar when it first came out. Gibson probably did not make many of them, and they were discontinued after one year. They were supposed to be pretty good, despite being made at a time when Gibson was going through some painful changes. Given the time that they were released to the public, the strange thing was that it was not Jackson/Charvel that Gibson was trying to compete with. No, it was Kramer Guitars, which had most of the Hair Metal guitarists firmly in their camp back then. Kramer had a near-exclusive deal with Floyd Rose, and few other factory guitars were allowed to be sold with a Floyd Rose tremolo until the deal expired.

TS, HNGD! Enjoy the hell out of it!
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#13
Quote by FatalGear41
When Wayne Charvel sold his company to Grover Jackson, the sale included the name "Charvel." Gibson originally advertised and marketed their guitar as a "Wayne Charvel" model and the ads stated in bold print "Wayne Charvel is no longer involved with or associated with Charvel Guitars." The folks at Jackson were understandably concerned, as some people might interpret that statement to mean that guitars sold with the "Charvel" name and trademark were somehow not "true" Charvel guitars. So the lawsuit was over the name; not the guitar.

I remember that guitar when it first came out. Gibson probably did not make many of them, and they were discontinued after one year. They were supposed to be pretty good, despite being made at a time when Gibson was going through some painful changes. Given the time that they were released to the public, the strange thing was that it was not Jackson/Charvel that Gibson was trying to compete with. No, it was Kramer Guitars, which had most of the Hair Metal guitarists firmly in their camp back then. Kramer had a near-exclusive deal with Floyd Rose, and few other factory guitars were allowed to be sold with a Floyd Rose tremolo until the deal expired.

TS, HNGD! Enjoy the hell out of it!


There's a touch of irony in the fact that Gibson now owns the Kramer name...
#14
HNGD

Those are quite rare guitars
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate