#1
Love'em or hate'em? I quit using them after awhile. I'm not totally against their use but I do find strict rhythm to be a little confining.
#2
I much rather have a drum machine. I rarely use it tho.

The only time i actually use a drum machine for practice is when i am practicing my internal clock.
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#3
I don't use it to often either anymore but who says you have to play strict rhythm with a metronome. Metronomes make your internal clock strong so when you do start playing off rhythms or broken rhythms your inside clock does not become juttered.
#4
Quote by Fourfourforever
I don't use it to often either anymore but who says you have to play strict rhythm with a metronome. Metronomes make your internal clock strong so when you do start playing off rhythms or broken rhythms your inside clock does not become juttered.

This is very important, practicing to be able to play behind and infront of a beat as well as playing phrase that feel natural but still in time is difficult. This is what makes your music breathe. Anyone can learn to play strict time using a metronome, but learning the subtleties of time is a difficult task. After all time is one of the most fundamental aspects of music, the other two that come after it are silence and noise. The other six fundamental parameters of music is derived from these. A metronome is there to make you human, using it to make yourself a machine is wrong.
#5
This might sound weird, but I always seem to mess up when I use a metronome. To keep in time, I usually play along with a few recordings to get the feel of it and my internal clock is pretty good.

I don't know, I have used one in a couple years so I might actually feel more comfortable with it now.
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#6
Quote by aerosmithfan95
This might sound weird, but I always seem to mess up when I use a metronome. To keep in time, I usually play along with a few recordings to get the feel of it and my internal clock is pretty good.

I don't know, I have used one in a couple years so I might actually feel more comfortable with it now.


Not really weird, you've just not practised with one enough. A metronome is not "rhythmic" as such, it just keeps time. When you are playing along with a recording you are playing to the rhythm rather than (with a metronome) playing the rhythm in time.

If that makes sense.

Anyway, incorporate some metronome practice into your routine. You don't have to do it all the time, but it is a good skill to develop.
#7
I thought I had a pretty good sense of rhythm...but then I played to a click and realised that I was speeding up and slowing down in certain sections of different tunes. And that goes for a lot of people I know so I've found that one's internal clock is often unreliable unless well developed...and that's where metronomes step in. Me and my band mate will sometimes jam our songs together with a metronome to ensure that our rhythms and timing are as constant and tight as possible. And now we're recording so there will definitely be a click track involved so we've had good practice. I agree with Fourfour and Golden, feel is most important and playing to a click doesn't mean that one has to keep to rhythms mechanically.
#8
I think they are good for people learning music. After awhile you probably don't need them once you develop a sense of timing. Since I'm still learning I still use it but I don't need it to play all the time its just helpful.
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#9
I use them for more complex stuff, but I have a loathing of the way they are strict. They do not reflect the intricacies and subtle fluctuations in timing which even the most mechanical drummers will have. Bands like Earth would sound awful if Adrienne played with the stringency that a web drumkit uses. Those little subtleties are fundamental to music.

Good for practice though. It's both useful and necessary in a practice-oriented session.
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#10
I play open guitar on a backing drum or metronome maybe once a week.
Playing to a click, helps you to become a tighter guitarist when recording.
But I don't think you have to practice with it heaps.
Of course if your kind of a sloppy player, and too loose. You have to play with a click for like a week or two in order to clean up and tighten your play.
#11
Quote by Myshadow46_2
Not really weird, you've just not practised with one enough. A metronome is not "rhythmic" as such, it just keeps time. When you are playing along with a recording you are playing to the rhythm rather than (with a metronome) playing the rhythm in time.

If that makes sense.

Anyway, incorporate some metronome practice into your routine. You don't have to do it all the time, but it is a good skill to develop.


I completely understand what you're saying. I always found it easier to pop on a record and follow the drums (or do that in person) than a metronome. As I said, I haven't used one in at least 3 years so I'll definitely be more comfortable with it now than back than.
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