#1
Guys, can somebody explain me what exact scale/mode is played in the intro (after drum starts) of Baroque n roll of malmsteen>? I know it is harmonic minor. But he always does two different harmonic minor scales and mix, it sounds similar. But when you play u can exatly figure out that they are two different harmonic minor. It is in many solos. Can anybody explain me this? I am also addicted to play like this from 10 yrs before. But i want to know exactly what i am doing. I think i am stupid.
#2
It is harmonic minor, your correct.
But malmsteen, like other shredders, mix up scales and add notes and play them in tripets or other tuplets.
#3
Quote by TwoPlusTwo
It is harmonic minor, your correct.
But malmsteen, like other shredders, mix up scales and add notes and play them in tripets or other tuplets.


i agree to some point, but such guitarist knows exactly what they are doing, they dont just mix it, they add extra note out of that scale in such a way that it gives u heart touching melody. For example, 'a sharp' note when descending in 'A harmonic minor' gives you fantastic melody. Actually it is supposed to be D minor scale or A phyrgian when you play 'a sharp' note 'and miss b note' while playing A natural minor scale. Is this process called mixing of scales or is it another mode/scale? OR is it called BAch, Paganini style? or is it called real neoclassical music? Gamoto, i am stucked at this point.

This is obviously not mixing of scale, because when you listen the music and play it, it is completely one melody line.

Example:caprice 24, it is said melodic minor, but i dont believe it is . few lines in beginning is melodic minor, but after 2-3 lines, it goes to mixing up of two minor scales, **** man! What is this? and melodiy is nonstop. It looks, that scale is made for that melody!!!!
#4
Intro - G# minor, 6th and 7th are probably sharpened when ascending.

First theme - G# minor, passes through C# minor then you have a Fx diminished 7th arpeggio to bring it back to G# minor.

So pretty bog standard minor key.

That's just from memory though.
#5
Quote by sbida
i agree to some point, but such guitarist knows exactly what they are doing, they dont just mix it, they add extra note out of that scale in such a way that it gives u heart touching melody. For example, 'a sharp' note when descending in 'A harmonic minor' gives you fantastic melody. Actually it is supposed to be D minor scale or A phyrgian when you play 'a sharp' note 'and miss b note' while playing A natural minor scale. Is this process called mixing of scales or is it another mode/scale? OR is it called BAch, Paganini style? or is it called real neoclassical music? Gamoto, i am stucked at this point.

This is obviously not mixing of scale, because when you listen the music and play it, it is completely one melody line.

Example:caprice 24, it is said melodic minor, but i dont believe it is . few lines in beginning is melodic minor, but after 2-3 lines, it goes to mixing up of two minor scales, **** man! What is this? and melodiy is nonstop. It looks, that scale is made for that melody!!!!

A melody line doesn't need to use notes in just one scale. It's called using accidentals and thinking in sound, not just fingerings. If you only think like "now I'm going to mix these two scales", it won't flow that well. But if you just think about the sound you are going to make, the different scales don't matter. Malmsteen knows what he is doing, he doesn't just randomly mix two scales, he knows what his playing will sound like. And using accidentals is really usual.

Oh, and I wouldn't say he mixes two scales, he just uses one scale plus some accidentals (notes outside of that scale). If you know the intervals of the scale, it helps.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Jul 31, 2013,
#6
The key to understanding melody is to start thinking in sound, not in scales. In other words, know the sound of the intervals of your scale and understand how (in this case) adding accidentals will change those sounds.
#7
i am not convinced yet. I think this discussion will end with the phrase: "play with ears"
I agree all of you guys, thanks for sharing