#1
Hokay, so. I've been messing around with a few fuzzes. Namely the muff pi and the swollen pickle and what not. But I cannot seem to find a good fuzz that doesn't sound like balls in live playing. Sounds great at first, then the bass drops, the drummer kicks and my effors are all for naught. Has anyone ever had or used a fuzz that performs in an exemplary fashion live? If so which ones were they and why if you would plz.
I only feel like me when I'm behind my ax...
#2
turn the scoop all the way up on the swollen pickle. this'll give you a flat mid response. it'll sound different, but the inherent tone of the big muff is in the scooped midrange. sounds great for recorded, doesn't sound at all live.
#3
Yeah, I've used a Swollen Pickle both live and in-studio for a few years now and I always turn the internal mids trim all the way away from the stock position, then turn the scoop up between noon and three o'clock. I also set the tone knob pretty high--it still has a ton of bass, so the tone knob just sort of opens it up. It works well for me, it cuts like a buffalo for leads and blends with the bass in a cool way when I play chords.
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#4
Well an easy way is to turn the volume and gain all the way up. Your band will hate you for that though.

The Blackout Effectors Musket Fuzz can get downright honk-tastic with the 2nd revision's midrange knob.
#5
You can try setting the fuzz the way you like it, then boosting the mids after with an EQ?

Regardless... your tone WILL change if you're trying to add mids, so... Eh. Might as well just let an EQ do an EQ's job, and let the fuzz do its job. Try to balance them out for a tone you can live with.
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Last edited by Offworld92 at Jul 31, 2013,
#6
carolina effects olympia fuzz. let me know when it gets to your door. Can you hear the mids?

http://carolineguitar.com/products/olympia_fuzz/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WpgGdpppfKY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LEW-FjEdSjk
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#7
[114qthx for all the info, guys. I do run a ge-7 in my loop. And tend to bump the mids a little, although it does seem to take away from the fuzziness of the tone. When you turn the mids up it seems to get really woofy sounding, yes it pushes tons of air, but the sear and sizzle seems to be lost. Some guys have much success getting their fuzz to cut through without blasting the highs. Why is this?
I only feel like me when I'm behind my ax...
#8
Quote by NakedInTheRain
turn the scoop all the way up on the swollen pickle. this'll give you a flat mid response. it'll sound different, but the inherent tone of the big muff is in the scooped midrange. sounds great for recorded, doesn't sound at all live.


That seems to be the generally accepted idea, but I've never really found that to be the case. I see lots of bands with Big Muffs out there and they all seem to be able to be heard just fine.
#9
But I still don't understand how they do that... Some guys can just get away with that kind of thing I guess. Maybe it has alot to do with the band mix and makeup rather than the individual sound. What do you guys think?
I only feel like me when I'm behind my ax...
#10
Quote by slayer1979
[114qthx for all the info, guys. I do run a ge-7 in my loop. And tend to bump the mids a little, although it does seem to take away from the fuzziness of the tone. When you turn the mids up it seems to get really woofy sounding, yes it pushes tons of air, but the sear and sizzle seems to be lost. Some guys have much success getting their fuzz to cut through without blasting the highs. Why is this?

the sear and sizzle comes from the scooped mids. your mids lead won't sound as muffy by itself, but it'll still sound like a fuzz in the mix.
#11
I guess tthe fuzz gods have forsaken me... or i just have a poopy band mix. When you think about it, each instrument fulfills a specific frequency bandwidth. The bass, well you know where that goes. The drums provide rhythm and highs, The vocals fill the high mids, and the guitar is left to fill out most of the mids, and often times the guitarist is playing with a mid scooped tone anyways, which is inherent of the fuzz tone naturally. Should i try tweeking the frequency bandwidth slightly so as to not get phased out by the rest o the guys? Is this something anyone else does, fine tuning frequencies for better cut?
I only feel like me when I'm behind my ax...