#1
The other day, I was listening to a song and I thought that i heard some acoustic drumming in it. The thing is that most of the drums on the album this song came from are programmed drums. So I'm not 100% sure which one it could be. The question is how can you tell acoustic drums from programmed drums? Nowadays, drum machines are so sophisticated that I want to make sure.
#2
If they're programmed well (and I mean very well), you shouldn't be able to tell a difference.

Most drum machines & software use sampled sounds, rather than synthesised sound, so there shouldn't be a difference there.

The main thing is that depending on the effort put into the programming, you may notice too much consistency in things like volume & tempo - slight variations in high hat volume for example may indicate real drums were used....however that can be programmed too. I know in a couple of my recordings I've deliberately programmed these slight variations, however those variations repeat every 8 bars, if someone was to put the effort in to make them random throughout a song, it would be harder to separate programmed drums from an acoustic set.

I'm sure more people will add more comparisons, but that's my two cents.
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#3
Yeah, I read a couple forum posts elsewhere that said the same thing. Thanks a lot. I'm gonna listen to it again and see if I can pick up some hints.
#4
It's a fairly pointless exercise though, as both sampled and "real" drums are recorded drums.
I agree 99.78% with GaryBillington.
As stated above, if this is done correctly, you shouldn't hear a difference.
Many drums are triggered on recordings as well, so even if a kick sounds *too* consistent, it might still be played by a "real" drummer on the recording, even if it's triggered.

As for the part with a segment of like 8 bars or whatever length being varied, and then it repeats every 8 bars...that's not necessarily an indication either, as many parts are recorded, and then copy/pasted in songs, just for consistency and to save time and money. Nailing an entire long section in a song is realllllly difficult and time consuming.

So to reiterate. It's a pointless exercise. It doesn't matter.
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#5
Quote by Shor
It's a fairly pointless exercise though, as both sampled and "real" drums are recorded drums.
I agree 99.78% with GaryBillington.
As stated above, if this is done correctly, you shouldn't hear a difference.
Many drums are triggered on recordings as well, so even if a kick sounds *too* consistent, it might still be played by a "real" drummer on the recording, even if it's triggered.

As for the part with a segment of like 8 bars or whatever length being varied, and then it repeats every 8 bars...that's not necessarily an indication either, as many parts are recorded, and then copy/pasted in songs, just for consistency and to save time and money. Nailing an entire long section in a song is realllllly difficult and time consuming.

So to reiterate. It's a pointless exercise. It doesn't matter.


i see your point.