#1
hi gays

q: whats the difference between the Gibson 1963 ES-335 Historic Block Reissue Electric Guitar the Gibson ES-335 Dot Plain-top Electric Guitar with Gloss Finish and the Gibson ES-335 Satin Finish Electric Guitar Faded Cherry? is there a big difference between the 3? is it worth spending 2k for the 1963 es-335?

thanks
#2
the 1963 one is a custom shop model

aside from that, other people will be able to tell you better than i will what the differences are.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#4
The Historic will be made to a higher standard. Historic is Gibson's flagship line. All of those models are excellent, though, and Gibson QC isn't awesome so it wouldn't be uncommon to find a non-historic that was just as good as a random Historic. On the other hand, the best Historic out of 10 will generally kick the crap out of the best non-Historic out of 10.

There's no way for us to tell you if it's worth the extra 2K for the Historic. A lot of that price is markup, but there is actually some extra care that goes into those models. I can say that it would be incredibly rash to buy any of these guitars without playing at least the one you're going to buy, if not several examples of each model. Gibsons in general, and hollow- and semi-hollowbodies on top of that, vary an awful lot from instrument to instrument.

Anyway, I don't have the specs in front of me but Historics get first choice on woods, so they should be the most consistently resonant. The Historics are also supposed to be generally more carefully made, but again who knows with the way Gibson works. Aside from that, the Dot has dot inlays and the block has block inlays and the satin finish has a satin instead of a gloss finish (super insightful, I know). Any other specs should be fairly minor and available on the Gibson site.

So my advice is to just play as many of these models as you can, and not worry about the differences between them so much. When you find the right one, you'll know. Gibson doesn't always get it right, but when they do they'll blow you away.
#5
roc thanks a lot Unfortunately i cant play and choose cause i live in europe and we don't have the 3 of them. but i heard it on youtube and they all sound very good...it seems like they all have 57 humbuckers...but else i don't know. any way thank u!
#6
Quote by zalopa
roc thanks a lot Unfortunately i cant play and choose cause i live in europe and we don't have the 3 of them. but i heard it on youtube and they all sound very good...it seems like they all have 57 humbuckers...but else i don't know. any way thank u!



You can test them at home......

http://www.thomann.de/gb/gibson_es335_dot_plain_vsb.htm

http://www.thomann.de/de/gibson_es335_1963_block_reissue_an.htm

30-day money back guarrantee
#8
Thomann delivers anywhere in Europe. Change the country from their home page.
#9
Quote by Roc8995
Thomann delivers anywhere in Europe. Change the country from their home page.


they ship worldwide
#10
Quote by Dave_Mc
the 1963 one is a custom shop model
.


Waaaal, let's put it this way. There's a CS before the number in the serial number. Truth is, that doesn't mean a thing these days. There have been two "Custom Shops" for a while now. One produced custom guitars, the other was a serial number change on otherwise ordinary production guitars and created a significant price bump. What it did not do was create a significantly "better" guitar.

One of the guys on MLP just picked up that "Reissue of a '63 Sorta" 335 and has file marks and gouges in the fretboard and it's overall just a mess of a guitar. The one that I glanced at in one of the local GCs a bit ago earned a heartfelt "meh."
#11
...i don't get it. there is no significant change between the 3?
#12
There is, but quality control has never been Gibson's strong suit. A good Historic will be noticeably better than a good non-historic; your odds of getting a good historic are better than of getting a good non-historic. It's just that there's more luck involved than with most other companies. Fender, for example - a Custom Shop strat is basically always going to be noticeably nicer than a MIA Standard. With Gibson you often get a surprise, in one direction or the other.

So there's a significant difference, it's just hard to tell sometimes because one guitar isn't representative of the line in the way that it is with most manufacturers.
#13
I think that Gibson have improved over the last decade. I believe that they had a 'dark' period in the 90s but are now largely sorted. It seems that they find it difficult to shake that period.

Paruwi, I never said that the 335 was chambered. He asked if lighter guitars are better sounding and if the 1lb difference would make a difference. I then said that differences in tone come from guitars that are chambered, have lightweight woods, pickups etc and 1lb wouldn't make it sound different, I wasn't talking about the 335 in particular and of course I know they aren't chambered. I think you misunderstood in the previous thread.
Last edited by Mephaphil at Aug 1, 2013,
#14
They've definitely improved. I think 08 in particular they turned a lot of things around, and I've seen far fewer genuinely bad Gibsons.

That said, they still have more variation within models than most. You're not likely to get a 335 that's got major flaws (that one guitar I'm sure will keep MLP busy for years, but that's one instrument) but you're still fairly likely to sit down with 10 Gibsons and find that the one that costs $2000 sounds and feels better than the one that costs $4000. There aren't many other brands that you could say that about.

So the QC problems turned into QC annoyances. They seem to have fixed most of the actual quality problems but still struggle with consistency. That's probably the word I should have used in the first place.