#1
I own a squire strat with a humbucker bridge pickup, and I've been wanting to get into modding for some time. Only problem is, I know no mods and know nothing about modding in general. So basically I'm sending out a noob call for help here, could anyone give me something like an intro to modding? And maybe include links/instructions to good, simple, cheap mods?
#3
yeah, ultimately it depends on how much money you want to put into your axe.
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#4
I'd say I'm looking at a $50 or less budget, but right now I'm looking for simple mods just to mod.
#5
Well if you're modding just to mod, doesn't that defeat the purpose of modding?

Here's a few simple mods:

The Snake Special
Take a permanent marker and draw a snake anywhere on your guitar. Guarantees extra snakiness at any gig.

Simple Value Increase Mod V1
This one's a little technical, you'll need to find a closed cavity on the guitar. On strat types this will be behind the pickguard, on most gibson types, somewhere on the back. Carefully open the cavity, being careful not to lose any screws, they are all harmonically important. If you lose one you'll have to replace the whole set, or risk bad mojo. Now once you have the cavity open, carefully place a dollar bill anywhere in the cavity, then close the cavity again and put the screws back. Be careful not to strip any of the screw holes, or you'll have to replace your entire guitar. Congratulations, your guitar has increased in value by a whole dollar.

Simple Value Increase Mod V100
As above, but with 100 dollar bill.

Hendrix Style Paint-Job Mod
Douse guitar in lighter fluid and ahh... you get the idea.

Internal Fuzz Circuit
Open the guitar again as described in the value increase mod, also being very careful not to lose the hundreds of dollars you have already packed into the cavity. You will notice that in this cavity there are a lot of wires and metal diddly-bits. Unless of course you removed them all to make room for more money. What you'll need to do for this mod is glue fake fur all over the circuits. Guaranteed to make your guitar a lot fuzzier.
#6
Quote by johnnykbop
Well if you're modding just to mod, doesn't that defeat the purpose of modding?

Here's a few simple mods:

The Snake Special
Take a permanent marker and draw a snake anywhere on your guitar. Guarantees extra snakiness at any gig.

Simple Value Increase Mod V1
This one's a little technical, you'll need to find a closed cavity on the guitar. On strat types this will be behind the pickguard, on most gibson types, somewhere on the back. Carefully open the cavity, being careful not to lose any screws, they are all harmonically important. If you lose one you'll have to replace the whole set, or risk bad mojo. Now once you have the cavity open, carefully place a dollar bill anywhere in the cavity, then close the cavity again and put the screws back. Be careful not to strip any of the screw holes, or you'll have to replace your entire guitar. Congratulations, your guitar has increased in value by a whole dollar.

Simple Value Increase Mod V100
As above, but with 100 dollar bill.

Hendrix Style Paint-Job Mod
Douse guitar in lighter fluid and ahh... you get the idea.

Internal Fuzz Circuit
Open the guitar again as described in the value increase mod, also being very careful not to lose the hundreds of dollars you have already packed into the cavity. You will notice that in this cavity there are a lot of wires and metal diddly-bits. Unless of course you removed them all to make room for more money. What you'll need to do for this mod is glue fake fur all over the circuits. Guaranteed to make your guitar a lot fuzzier.

Quote by Fat Lard
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Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#7
www.guitarfetish.com has good pickups for $30ish. I have a Fat Pat and it is a very nice pickup.

While your at it look at their locking tuners $30ish also.

New full size pots would be ideal also.

You can get a set of stainless steel saddles for $12 that will improve sustain a little.

A bone nut or a graphtech nut will be a big improvement $10
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#8
Quote by Robbgnarly
www.guitarfetish.com has good pickups for $30ish. I have a Fat Pat and it is a very nice pickup.

While your at it look at their locking tuners $30ish also.

New full size pots would be ideal also.

You can get a set of stainless steel saddles for $12 that will improve sustain a little.

A bone nut or a graphtech nut will be a big improvement $10

You need a GFS endorsement.
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#9
None of the above mods will change your guitar's sound much (if at all) except for the spendy "swap out your pickups" one.

If you have a set of four-wire pickups in your guitar, and you're willing to solder up some switches, you can have a great time. First up are coil taps. If you have four-wire pickups (three wires work, too), you can set each pickup to serial/parallel/single coil modes. Ibanez did this back in the '70's with their Tri-Sound switches on several of their better guitars. These substantially change the sound of whatever humbucker pickups you have in stalled. You can use three-way miniswitches (my preference), push-pull pots, or you can pick up a set of pickup bezels that have switches built into them (the Triple Shot from Seymour Duncan, for example).

You can rewire a quad of pots to do other things. Rather than a 2V 2T setup, you could wire up a Master Volume, a Treble rolloff (standard "tone" pot), a Mids rolloff (Gibson put one of these in the original L6S and the information is available) and a Blend knob (when both pickups are selected, you dial in more or less of each pickup). Instead of the Mids rolloff, there's also a bass rolloff (this is in the current L6S reissue and the information for THAT is also available).

A simple wiring change will throw the bridge and neck pickups out of phase with each other when both are selected (no need to flip magnets, etc.). You'll need some kind of switch for that, of course. It works REALLY well with the Blend knob, and if you have a mids or bass rolloff in addition to the treble rolloff, you get some really great tones out of it). You'll want to be able to switch back to "in phase" (I usually do this with a miniswitch).

That's a start for the cheap ones...
#10
I just finished my first modding project - also on a SSH strat type guitar. It was cheap and maybe it will be something for you.

I shielded the pickguard and electronics cavities with aluminum foil which is supposed to reduce electronic noise. I can't say that I've noticed much of a difference though - maybe shielding is just over-sexed, maybe my noise is coming from my pickups, my cables or my horrible cheap amp or maybe I just didn't do it right. At least it's dirt cheap. You only need some aluminum foil and some glue.

While I had the pickguard off I also did three small electronics mods. All of them were relatively cheap (some switches and a few bits of wire) and I was able to make them successfully without ruining anything although I've never touched a soldering iron before in my life.

I did a 7 tone mod which allows me to use all three pickups at once or to use the neck-bridge combination. All there is to it is a little switch that allows you to turn on your neck pickup independently of the 5-way switch. It is a little simple on/off switch. One pole of the switch is connected to the spot where the signal from the neck pickup goes into the 5-way switch. The other pole of the switch is connected to the wire that runs from the 5-way switch to the volume pot.

Next was a phase reversal switch on the middle pickup. Normally pickups work together - the signals are added to each other (or so I suppose). When you reverse the phase of a pickup you essentially subtracts that signal from the other pickup. Instead of getting the sound of two pickups together you only get the difference between the two pickups. The result is a much quieter, thin sound. To make this mod you need a switch that allows you to send the ground signal from the pickup to where the hot signal would otherwise be. It is relatively simple to do with a DPDT switch. You can find lots of diagrams just by doing a quick Google search.

Finally I installed a killswitch. The killswitch turns off your guitar as long as it is pressed down and you can use the staggered effect as part of your music or just if you like to have as many buttons and switches as possible. To install a killswitch you need a simple push button. It has to be a non-latching, normally off type. One pole of the switch is soldered to the point where the signal goes to the output jack. The other pole should be connected to ground. When the button is pressed down, all of your signal will go directly to ground and nothing will reach the amp.

As for other mods you can always do cosmetic work like changing the knobs or pickguard.
#11
Quote by dspellman
None of the above mods will change your guitar's sound much (if at all) except for the spendy "swap out your pickups" one.

I agree, but Pickups don't have to be expensive to sound good. GFS sound good and are mostly $30ish each and set for strats are $52+. That's pretty cheap

But even though most of the mods don't improve the sound, they do improve playability, tuning stability.
2002 PRS CE22
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2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
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Morley Bad Horsie 2
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#12
A new nut will improve nothing if the old one was properly done. If you're not having tuning issues (which are usually traceable to how the nut is cut) and/or if your action isn't so low that you're getting buzzing on the first few frets, you may as well just put down "new nut" in your list of "maybe I'll need this someday."

Stainless steel saddles won't do anything for you. This is a religious issue, I realize, so this is pure opinion. But I've watched several Callaham stainless bridges and tailpieces go on guitars and come right back off a few days later. Folks paid some serious coin for them but weren't thrilled with the sound. I'm not sure that bridge saddles make a huge difference, though you would suspect that they might make at least a small one. I've got '60's Gibson guitars with flippin' original nylon saddles (two 335s, for starters), and I've had people tell me that they sound more "balanced", yada yada, than the metal ones. I dunno -- I like the sound and that's probably all that counts.

Swap your pots only if you need to. It doesn't matter if they don't have linear rolloff if you dime them all the time anyway. It doesn't matter if they're full-size or smaller Bournes or Alphas, either. Nothing special or better about "full-size" except that it's what some old guitars had. Save pot and capacitor swapping for when you're completely bored, have money you don't know what else to do with, when your ears have developed so that you can hear a difference and for when you have extra time.

Locking tuners do one thing -- they make it slightly easier to string the guitar. They'll save you a few seconds or even a whole minute per string change. If you want to speed things up on all of your guitars (including the ones you may get that don't have locking tuners when new), get a cheap electric screwdriver and one of those bits that fit the chuck that allow you to wind the tuners faster.



Finally, cheap pickups. First thing to remember is that all pickups are cheap.

It's just that some people charge an awful lot of money for them.

A pickup can be (and are) put together for less than $5 worth of materials, unless you're buying the materials in tiny quantities at full retail. You can do your own pickups at home with improvised gear.



Honest to god, the guy doing the pickups above does an amazing job and the pickups sound really good. Gibson, on the other hand, does its pickups a whole bunch at a time by machine. In their usual inimitable fashion, they will charge you $120-150 and up for each one. The guy at Guitar Fetish pays less than $10 each for the pickups he charges you $30 for and he doesn't make them (a machine does, in Korea or China). Carvin's humbucking pickups cost about $55-60 each (until recently they were closer to $40). They've been making pickups for over 60 years down in the San Diego area. They make 17 different types of pickups for 6-string alone, with a wide variety of tonal ranges and output levels for each: http://www.carvinguitars.com/pickups/ but you'll inevitably have some internet Maroon tell you that "Carvin pickups sound sterile" in almost every thread that discusses Carvin. Whether he's actually ever touched one or not.

You have a Squier strat with a cheap humbucking pickup. There's no point in swapping it out for another random cheap humbucking pickup just so that you can say you "modded" the guitar. If you like the sound of it, leave it alone. If you don't like the sound of it, figure out what it is that you don't like. Then figure out what pickup is supposed to have the sound that you DO like. Do not rely on "Internet Consensus." Get off your duff and go find one and listen to it and make sure that it's not the guitar or the amp that's making it sound good. When you put any new pickup in a guitar, it will almost always sound better than the old one. That's largely because you've spent money on the new one and you don't want to be telling yourself that you were an idiot to do so. So there will be a honeymoon period where it sounds wonderful. After that, you can make a decision as to whether it was a good idea or not. Until, however, you have trained ears, you won't know what you're hearing.
Last edited by dspellman at Aug 2, 2013,
#13
Quote by Regicollis


I shielded the pickguard and electronics cavities with aluminum foil which is supposed to reduce electronic noise. I can't say that I've noticed much of a difference though - maybe shielding is just over-sexed, maybe my noise is coming from my pickups, my cables or my horrible cheap amp or maybe I just didn't do it right. At least it's dirt cheap. You only need some aluminum foil and some glue.


If you don't have the aluminum (or copper) foil wired to run to ground, you "shielded" nothing.
#14
Quote by Robbgnarly
www.guitarfetish.com has good pickups for $30ish. I have a Fat Pat and it is a very nice pickup.

While your at it look at their locking tuners $30ish also.

New full size pots would be ideal also.

You can get a set of stainless steel saddles for $12 that will improve sustain a little.

A bone nut or a graphtech nut will be a big improvement $10

Everything he just said here is good. A graphtec black tusq nut can do alot for tuning stability and a bit for sustain/harmonics

GFS pickups are really good, I've got a set (lil killers) and I couldn't be happier with them. don't worry about locking tuners if a graphtec nut fixes your tuning stability. If you feel up to it you could go in and redo your wiring, if you have some hum issues you could try shielding your cavities.
Quote by R45VT
Bastards.
#15
I've got a pretty good stack of guitars. Many of them have some pretty advanced features from the factory, or they've been ordered custom. I've had just a few modded to do things I needed them to do. Here's one:



The guitar has a thin (depth) neck profile with a wide (1 3/4") nut, jumbo frets, 16" radius ebony fretboard, abalone inlays, triple binding on body and headstock, single binding on the neck. It's got neck-through construction, a recessed Floyd, a full 3/4" figured maple cap, a one-piece mahogany body (the neck was laid into a channel cut into the one-piece body). Truth is, the neck-through business gets chopped right where the Floyd spring cavity gets routed, so it's probably more just a "really long tenon" guitar <G>. When it arrived, everything "hardware" but the tuners was shaken out and set aside and the "modding" began.

The frets were superglued (like this: http://www.stewmac.com/tsarchive/ts0043.html ) and PLEK'd. The back of it was routed for a Fernandes Sustainer, a battery box (for the sustainer) and for the repositioning of one of the controls. It now looks like a checkerboard back there.
Pickups are now a hot, hand-selected '57 (9.2kohm) in the bridge and a single-coil-size stacked humbucker (DiMarzio Fast Track II 18kohm) in the neck, living in the neck pickup ring next to the Sustainer Driver. In the photo, you can see two miniswitches behind the Floyd. Those are the Sustainer on-off and the Harmonic selector (three position). The black dot above them is a Buckethead-style kill switch. To the left of that is the master tone control. To the left of that is the Master volume, which has been repositioned near the bridge/bridge pickup so that it can be used for pinky swells. Above and between those two knobs is a Chandler Tone-X active sweepable mids boost (about 16 dB) on a push-pull. Think Parked Wah. To the right of that is a Sustainer Intensity pot. Since this picture was taken the Floyd has been tossed and a German Gotoh with a Floyd upgrades brass sustain block has been dropped in. Oh. And straplocks.

Two other mods. The switch knob is now amber (not shown) and the "poker chip" switch surround is an aluminum anodized thing with slightly different text:



Other than that, it's just your basic ordinary single cut boat anchor.
#16
Quote by dspellman
A new nut will improve nothing if the old one was properly done. If you're not having tuning issues (which are usually traceable to how the nut is cut) and/or if your action isn't so low that you're getting buzzing on the first few frets, you may as well just put down "new nut" in your list of "maybe I'll need this someday."

Stainless steel saddles won't do anything for you. This is a religious issue, I realize, so this is pure opinion. But I've watched several Callaham stainless bridges and tailpieces go on guitars and come right back off a few days later. Folks paid some serious coin for them but weren't thrilled with the sound. I'm not sure that bridge saddles make a huge difference, though you would suspect that they might make at least a small one. I've got '60's Gibson guitars with flippin' original nylon saddles (two 335s, for starters), and I've had people tell me that they sound more "balanced", yada yada, than the metal ones. I dunno -- I like the sound and that's probably all that counts.

Swap your pots only if you need to. It doesn't matter if they don't have linear rolloff if you dime them all the time anyway. It doesn't matter if they're full-size or smaller Bournes or Alphas, either. Nothing special or better about "full-size" except that it's what some old guitars had. Save pot and capacitor swapping for when you're completely bored, have money you don't know what else to do with, when your ears have developed so that you can hear a difference and for when you have extra time.

Locking tuners do one thing -- they make it slightly easier to string the guitar. They'll save you a few seconds or even a whole minute per string change. If you want to speed things up on all of your guitars (including the ones you may get that don't have locking tuners when new), get a cheap electric screwdriver and one of those bits that fit the chuck that allow you to wind the tuners faster.



Finally, cheap pickups. First thing to remember is that all pickups are cheap.

It's just that some people charge an awful lot of money for them.

A pickup can be (and are) put together for less than $5 worth of materials, unless you're buying the materials in tiny quantities at full retail. You can do your own pickups at home with improvised gear.



Honest to god, the guy doing the pickups above does an amazing job and the pickups sound really good. Gibson, on the other hand, does its pickups a whole bunch at a time by machine. In their usual inimitable fashion, they will charge you $120-150 and up for each one. The guy at Guitar Fetish pays less than $10 each for the pickups he charges you $30 for and he doesn't make them (a machine does, in Korea or China). Carvin's humbucking pickups cost about $55-60 each (until recently they were closer to $40). They've been making pickups for over 60 years down in the San Diego area. They make 17 different types of pickups for 6-string alone, with a wide variety of tonal ranges and output levels for each: http://www.carvinguitars.com/pickups/ but you'll inevitably have some internet Maroon tell you that "Carvin pickups sound sterile" in almost every thread that discusses Carvin. Whether he's actually ever touched one or not.

You have a Squier strat with a cheap humbucking pickup. There's no point in swapping it out for another random cheap humbucking pickup just so that you can say you "modded" the guitar. If you like the sound of it, leave it alone. If you don't like the sound of it, figure out what it is that you don't like. Then figure out what pickup is supposed to have the sound that you DO like. Do not rely on "Internet Consensus." Get off your duff and go find one and listen to it and make sure that it's not the guitar or the amp that's making it sound good. When you put any new pickup in a guitar, it will almost always sound better than the old one. That's largely because you've spent money on the new one and you don't want to be telling yourself that you were an idiot to do so. So there will be a honeymoon period where it sounds wonderful. After that, you can make a decision as to whether it was a good idea or not. Until, however, you have trained ears, you won't know what you're hearing.

While you have made some points, your not accurate in all of your "subjective" opinions.

A new nut can improve sustain and tuning stability regardless if the original is cut right. If it is made of the cheap plastic it will have a noticeable (which on a cheap squire is a given)

Changing saddles to a different material does affect tone and sustain

Locking tuners also help tuning stability in a tremolo equipped guitar that does not have a locking nut/double locking. Yes it also makes re-stringing easier and faster.

Carvin pickups are not very good at all. I have played quite a few different carvins and sterile is not how I would describe them at all. More like muddy, undefined or bright and brittle. Just because GFS are not made in CA does not make them bad , I will take a GFS over a Carvin pickup any day

I think it is great to nudge people into learning about what they are doing, but in reality most people don't think they have the ability to build pickups and for the one time guy most of the time the buying of materials, tools and time spent far out shadows the droping of money on a 1 time mod
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Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
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Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
Last edited by Robbgnarly at Aug 2, 2013,
#17
Quote by Robbgnarly


A new nut can improve sustain and tuning stability regardless if the original is cut right.


How? A properly cut nut will generally keep the strings from hanging up in the nut assuming the material permits it. If there's no issue with tuning stability in the first place, a new nut won't improve anything. A "new nut" doesn't do anything simply because it's new. I'm not sure how a new nut improves sustain -- perhaps you could illustrate. I've got nylon, bone, brass, brass and bone sandwich, teflon, mastadon something or other bone, etc., and I'm just not hearing noticeable changes in sustain on any of them.

Quote by Robbgnarly
Changing saddles to a different material does affect tone and sustain


Possibly so. But I've NOT seen the benefit from moving to stainless steel.

Quote by Robbgnarly
Locking tuners also help tuning stability in a tremolo equipped guitar that does not have a locking nut/double locking. Yes it also makes re-stringing easier and faster.


Mostly this was the hope, that locking tuners with less turns around the post would reduce tuning errors due to the wraps coming loose and then retightening. That was the theory. That theory was disproven maybe 18 years ago. I've had locking tuners on some guitars for over 20 years. I like 'em. But they do absolutely nothing for a trem-equipped guitar that's missing a locking nut or a behind-the-nut string lock.

Quote by Robbgnarly
Carvin pickups are not very good at all. I have played quite a few different carvins and sterile is not how I would describe them at all. More like muddy, undefined or bright and brittle. Just because GFS are not made in CA does not make them bad , I will take a GFS over a Carvin pickup any day


I don't have negative opinions regarding GFS pickups. Honestly, I haven't played enough of them on enough different guitars to have formed an opinion. And I don't own any.

I do have six Carvin guitars ranging in age from recent to 1988. Oh, and an active bass. I don't care for the pickups on exactly one guitar, which has the older M22N (neck) and -T (treble) pickups on a neck-through solid koa guitar with a flame maple cap. At some point, I'll pull those and put in the newer C22 series. I *love" the M22SD (about 13k) bridge pickup, however -- it's an outstanding raucous rock pickup that splits to a single coil perhaps better than any other humbucker I've tried. I have it in an older white pearl V220 (below) that's solid maple (body and neck) with an ebony fretboard and a Kahler. Greg Leon, an old friend, borrowed the guitar from for a week or two and when he handed it back, said it was the best-balanced guitar ("physically or tonally?" "Both!") for his kind of music that he'd ever played. Greg has a Wiki entry that's a fun read -- check it out. The C22 series is excellent -- just gorgeous, particularly on koa and mahogany guitars. And the H22 (Holdsworth) series is almost universally praised, at least among those who've actually played them.



What's difficult, given the extremely wide range of pickups available from them, and the even wider range of guitar models (bolt necks, neck-throughs, set necks, PRS types, hollow bodies, carved tops, tele styles, strat styles, superstrat styles, single cut flat tops, headless, chambered etc.,) and the even wider range of body, neck and top materials (walnut, hard rock maple, koa, mahogany, poplar, ash, and much more)... is understanding how folks can play a couple of guitars and make wide ranging blanket pronunciations about all of Carvin's pickups.


As you can see, there are opinions and there are opinions.
#18
Quote by Regicollis

I shielded the pickguard and electronics cavities with aluminum foil which is supposed to reduce electronic noise. I can't say that I've noticed much of a difference though - maybe shielding is just over-sexed, maybe my noise is coming from my pickups, my cables or my horrible cheap amp or maybe I just didn't do it right. At least it's dirt cheap. You only need some aluminum foil and some glue.



Shielding works.

You just didn't do it right.
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#19
Shielding didn't work for you because you can't just tape tin/aluminum foil into a guitar cavity, What you need is double sided adhesive conductive copper foil to do the job, Then you solder it to the ground.
Quote by R45VT
Bastards.
Last edited by Viban at Aug 2, 2013,
#20
Quote by dspellman
How? A properly cut nut will generally keep the strings from hanging up in the nut assuming the material permits it. If there's no issue with tuning stability in the first place, a new nut won't improve anything. A "new nut" doesn't do anything simply because it's new. I'm not sure how a new nut improves sustain -- perhaps you could illustrate. I've got nylon, bone, brass, brass and bone sandwich, teflon, mastadon something or other bone, etc., and I'm just not hearing noticeable changes in sustain on any of them.


Possibly so. But I've NOT seen the benefit from moving to stainless steel.


Mostly this was the hope, that locking tuners with less turns around the post would reduce tuning errors due to the wraps coming loose and then retightening. That was the theory. That theory was disproven maybe 18 years ago. I've had locking tuners on some guitars for over 20 years. I like 'em. But they do absolutely nothing for a trem-equipped guitar that's missing a locking nut or a behind-the-nut string lock.


I don't have negative opinions regarding GFS pickups. Honestly, I haven't played enough of them on enough different guitars to have formed an opinion. And I don't own any.

I do have six Carvin guitars ranging in age from recent to 1988. Oh, and an active bass. I don't care for the pickups on exactly one guitar, which has the older M22N (neck) and -T (treble) pickups on a neck-through solid koa guitar with a flame maple cap. At some point, I'll pull those and put in the newer C22 series. I *love" the M22SD (about 13k) bridge pickup, however -- it's an outstanding raucous rock pickup that splits to a single coil perhaps better than any other humbucker I've tried. I have it in an older white pearl V220 (below) that's solid maple (body and neck) with an ebony fretboard and a Kahler. Greg Leon, an old friend, borrowed the guitar from for a week or two and when he handed it back, said it was the best-balanced guitar ("physically or tonally?" "Both!") for his kind of music that he'd ever played. Greg has a Wiki entry that's a fun read -- check it out. The C22 series is excellent -- just gorgeous, particularly on koa and mahogany guitars. And the H22 (Holdsworth) series is almost universally praised, at least among those who've actually played them.



What's difficult, given the extremely wide range of pickups available from them, and the even wider range of guitar models (bolt necks, neck-throughs, set necks, PRS types, hollow bodies, carved tops, tele styles, strat styles, superstrat styles, single cut flat tops, headless, chambered etc.,) and the even wider range of body, neck and top materials (walnut, hard rock maple, koa, mahogany, poplar, ash, and much more)... is understanding how folks can play a couple of guitars and make wide ranging blanket pronunciations about all of Carvin's pickups.


As you can see, there are opinions and there are opinions.

The nut material will affect sustain and tone and tuning stability. Especially when the nut material is the cheap plastic that is found on lowend guitars.

Yes you deff have a wider range of experience with Carvin pickups. I like the guitars, but I have found the pickups on the several models I have tried very meh
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
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Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#21
Quote by Robbgnarly
The nut material will affect sustain and tone and tuning stability. Especially when the nut material is the cheap plastic that is found on lowend guitars.

Yes you deff have a wider range of experience with Carvin pickups. I like the guitars, but I have found the pickups on the several models I have tried very meh

+!
I also found that on my guitars with the Black tusq nuts the harmonics seemed to ring louder and truer than with the cheap POS plastic nut.
Quote by R45VT
Bastards.
#22
Quote by Viban
+!
I also found that on my guitars with the Black tusq nuts the harmonics seemed to ring louder and truer than with the cheap POS plastic nut.


Does that seem to be true on harmonics on non-open strings as well?
#23
No, Just like when you hit the harmonic to do intonation, that type.
Quote by R45VT
Bastards.
#24
Quote by Viban
+!
I also found that on my guitars with the Black tusq nuts the harmonics seemed to ring louder and truer than with the cheap POS plastic nut.


#25
My shielding is grounded. I measured an electrical resistance of a few ohms (meaning there is a connection) between the bridge (which is grounded) and a tiny sliver of foil that is poking out under the pickguard.

Maybe the noise has been reduced and I'm just not aware of it or maybe the noise comes from somewhere else.
#26
Quote by Regicollis
My shielding is grounded. I measured an electrical resistance of a few ohms (meaning there is a connection) between the bridge (which is grounded) and a tiny sliver of foil that is poking out under the pickguard.

Maybe the noise has been reduced and I'm just not aware of it or maybe the noise comes from somewhere else.


Resistance of a few ohms is too much and will still pickup noise. The entire shield should read less than an ohm between any two points, anywhere.

Copper adhesive conductive tape is the right stuff. Gluing one sheet of Al foil is not as effective, nor can you solder onto it.
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