#1
Okay so I was thinking about learning to play the drums, I've got £300 to spend on a kit but I'd rather spend less (used is fine)

1. Is it okay to start with an electric kit? I know there's all the dilemma about not feeling like an acoustic kit and keep1ng it r3al br0, but I've got a neighbours/space issue so I wouldn't be able to use an acoustic one

2. Can I teach myself to play? Obviously there are loads of guitarists saying drums are easy and blah blah and I know it's not that simple but I still think I can have a go

3. What kit should I go for? I'm willing to buy used but it doesn't look like there's that much money to be saved on eBay... The Alesis DM6 looks decent
#2
Alright I guess I'll just adress each part seperately:

Your Budget: For that price range you'll either get a passable new e-kit or a solid used kit. I'd suggest trying to get a Yamaha (Dtxplorer, Dtx500k, ect) used if you can. I own a Dtx500k and while it leaves room to be desired in comparison to an acoustic set, its as good as you're going to get in that price range. Sets that mimic the multiple sounds each individual drum can cost several times your budget easily.

Starting On An Electric Set: As someone who started on an acoustic kit for 2 years then started using an electric set at home (acoustics at band practice) I think the whole debate about electric drum sets being inaccurate compared to acoustics in feel and how you learn is a little exaggerated. While I think you should try and find some time to play on an acoustic every now and then (depending on how serious you are, if its just a side hobby then who cares) you'll be fine on the electrics. As someone who is self conscious about the amount of noise I make (Yeah I probably should have picked a better instrument... haha) an electric drums set is such a convenience.

Teaching Yourself: That's a tough one. If you decide to teach yourself I think you should atleast watch plenty of tutorial videos and try to get as much solid advice as possible. One of my buddies who plays guitar also plays drums but had no sort of formal training and it really hurt him in the long run trying to gain more independence and play syncopated beats. Just make sure you're aware of your technique at all times and don't take shortcuts. I noticed it took me a good while compared to other drummers to get to a confident level of playing, but once I got there I grew much faster than them.

Random Things People Don't Consider:
1. Electric drum sets can still be a bit obnoxious volume wise, definitely won't bug your neighbors but sometimes your family may get bothered by hearing the sound of your sticks hitting the pads if they are in the same room.
2. You need to provide your own sound. You'll either need an amplifier, speakers, or just use headphones. None of that is usually part of the package.
3. Make sure they give you a drum throne too, unless you don't mind not getting one.
#4
I've been using a cheap guitar amp since I got my set without a problem. A bass amp may actually work better for drums by default without any equalization.

Some people also (I only do this for recording) run their drum sets through their computers into software such as Addictive Drums or Superior Drummer. The sounds provided by an electric drumset are usually hit-or-miss but you can get a fairly decent sound. With software you can get much more control over individual sounds and how they mix together. Of course this will cost you more money (unless you're a pirate ;D) and you need a solid computer to pull it off without latency and a consistent sound.
#5
I think it's a much better idea to use headphones rather than an amp to provide sound, since they give you a stereo image (rather than mono, as an amp would) and block out the sound of the pads to you, making it more immersive to play. You don't even need anything that expensive, I use Sennheiser HD 203s (which are around £30) and do the job fine

I started on an Electric kit, and it's honestly caused me no real problems (other than having to learn that digging into the edges of cymbals isn't a good idea). I think most of the things you learn on an electric kit convert very well to an acoustic (rudiments, technique and the actual parts you're learning), and while the feel is slightly different its not so much as you'd be able to do something on an electric but not on an acoustic (or vice versa).

Hope my ramblings are some help
#6
Quote by Lordyboy
I think it's a much better idea to use headphones rather than an amp to provide sound, since they give you a stereo image (rather than mono, as an amp would) and block out the sound of the pads to you, making it more immersive to play. You don't even need anything that expensive, I use Sennheiser HD 203s (which are around £30) and do the job fine

I started on an Electric kit, and it's honestly caused me no real problems (other than having to learn that digging into the edges of cymbals isn't a good idea). I think most of the things you learn on an electric kit convert very well to an acoustic (rudiments, technique and the actual parts you're learning), and while the feel is slightly different its not so much as you'd be able to do something on an electric but not on an acoustic (or vice versa).

Hope my ramblings are some help


I second this. My first kit was a hand me down Simmons from the 80s that I got for free. I even built the rack out of PVC pipe. I eventually got a hand me down acoustic kit (also free) I have mostly taught myself. I used a youtube channel called freedrumlessons to get some fundamentals and technique down. After that, I just started to play along with music to learn how and where stuff went.
You can do it!
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#7
Learning to play drums on an electric drum kit is like trying to learn to play with a Guitar Hero drum kit...
#8
Quote by buxeyy
Learning to play drums on an electric drum kit is like trying to learn to play with a Guitar Hero drum kit...


entirely false. I played rock band for 2 years before playing acoustic drums and I have to say it only hurt me when trying to learn real drums. My last year of practice has been with an electric set and I've only gotten better.

Oh and I just remembered another good way to get a similar feel to real drums is to use the sticks zildjian makes specifically for ekits. Regularl drumsticks are weird on an ekit, which is why people usually complain about different feeling.