#1
Hey! Hey! Idaho!
Where I let my first love go.
And where I learned to say goodbye.

Sure I’ve had other women,
but none I wanted to call my own.
Until I saw her in the summer time.

Hey! Hey! Idaho!
Where I let my first love go.
And where I learned to say goodbye.

I still recall her golden hair.
Shining in that midnight air.
But our night was ended by the rising sun.

Hey! Hey! Idaho!
Where I let my first love go.
And where I learned to say goodbye.

I won her over with my guitar,
In that smokey small town bar.
She was the first woman to let me go that far.

Hey! Hey! Idaho!
Where I let my first love go.
And where I learned to say goodbye.

When I pass the old state line.
I think of a lost love of mine.
And before I know it I am singing…

Hey! Hey! Idaho!
Where I let my first love go.
And where I learned to say goodbye.


Here's a very simple song I came up with. I actually wrote it to be a traditional bluegrass song, or possibly folk country, but I believe it could easily be transferred to other genres. I play it in the key of G, with a pretty standard progression of GCGDG. If I were to record this song I would probably have a short instrumental break after each chorus played by either a fiddle, banjo, dobro, or a mandolin. I think it would be a great song to get the crowd excited with! Tell me what you think
Last edited by NattyDaddy at Aug 4, 2013,
#2
It definitely has that "get you pumped up" feel to it. Reminds me of the running cadences from the military. Simple writing and a simple concept: a breathe of fresh air compared to alot of the convoluted psuedo-intellectual stuff that is all the rage these days. If I could make a suggestion it would be to add some humor to the song. A little laughter can go a long way into making srangers tune in to you.
#3
Thanks Ramble-on. And yeah, I agree some humor would go a ways in this song. But to be honest this song doesn't really revolve around the lyrics. This is meant to be a traditional bluegrass song where the words simply serve as place holders while band shows off their instrumentation skill by rotating breaks.