#1
Hi. I'm wondering about differences between a "boost" pedal and an "overdrive"
pedal. Don't wanna discuss distortion as most everything adds distortion
and I've plenty of distortion pedals and distorted amps - haha

Lately, messing around with different pedal line-ups, I use
the Micro Amp at the front my "experimental" pedal chain:
Guitar > Tuner > NS-2 > Micro Amp > Wah etc

I have the Micro Amp as an "always-on" line boost that's set low . . .
just to drive the original guitar signal through the chain. I like it.
I use the MC-401 at the end of this chain, turned-off unless I want volume boosted.

Does anyone use a boost pedal early in the chain just for simple line amplification
and another boost type pedal elsewhere in the chain for lead solos, etc?????



Second Question: IS there really a big difference between
true boost pedals and "clean" overdrive pedals???? What do you think?


* MXR M-133 Micro Amp Preamp Pedal
* MXR MC-401 Custom Audio Electronics Boost/Line Driver
* MXR M-77 Custom Badass Modified O.D. Pedal
* BOSS SD-2 Super Dual Overdrive
* BOSS OD-1 Overdrive Pedal
* EHX Electro Harmonix Hot Tubes (2x12AX7)
I own the above pedals. Love messin' around and mixing things up.
Will probably sell half of them, later.


Interesting Quote from "Guitar Gear":
"But here’s where we get into a bit of murky territory, especially between Overdrive and Distortion pedals. Strictly speaking if we’re talking about overdrive as simply overpowering the front-end of an amp to make the tubes clip, the only pedal that is technically an overdrive is a "boost" pedal that takes your guitar’s signal and ups the voltage. But many manufacturers call their pedals overdrive pedals. In reality, most of those are distortion pedals – this includes the venerable Tube Screamer. OMG! Sacrilege!

So how do you tell the difference? As a rule of thumb, a distortion pedal will create a distorted sound irrespective of the amp. In other words, it’ll clip on its own. Put it front of the clean channel of an amp, switch it on, and it’ll create distortion. However, many, if not most, “distortion” pedals also provide a bit of gain boost to overdrive an amp. That’s where it gets murky, as most of the pedals termed “overdrive pedal” function as a combination of both overdrive AND distortion."
Last edited by Toppscore at Aug 3, 2013,
#2
in practical terms, apart from the clipping you get from an overdrive pedal, the difference between an overdrive pedal and a clean boost is, generally overdrive pedals boost the midrange and roll off some low end giving you a tighter sound with more body and presence, even when it's run with the gain on 0 for a completely clean sound, whereas a clean boost will be more transparent just make the signal louder without filtering the sound.

I use a true bypass loop for all my pedals, so i can bypass my pedal chain completely, but i also have a nobels preamp pedal in the front to get the volume and tone of the pedal loop without any FX matched to the volume and tone of the bypass signal as much as possible.

since my amp has solid state preamp, i run an overdrive pedal at the same volume as the clean signal, with the desired amount of crunch dialed in on the pedal. then i use a compressor after the overdrive pedal, to 'boost' the signal for solos, except it's not really boosting, it's just squashing the peaks, allowing me to bring up the overall volume a little without clipping the amp's input stage.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#3
Quote by Toppscore
Interesting Quote from "Guitar Gear":
"But here’s where we get into a bit of murky territory, especially between Overdrive and Distortion pedals. Strictly speaking if we’re talking about overdrive as simply overpowering the front-end of an amp to make the tubes clip, the only pedal that is technically an overdrive is a "boost" pedal that takes your guitar’s signal and ups the voltage. But many manufacturers call their pedals overdrive pedals. In reality, most of those are distortion pedals – this includes the venerable Tube Screamer. OMG! Sacrilege!

So how do you tell the difference? As a rule of thumb, a distortion pedal will create a distorted sound irrespective of the amp. In other words, it’ll clip on its own. Put it front of the clean channel of an amp, switch it on, and it’ll create distortion. However, many, if not most, “distortion” pedals also provide a bit of gain boost to overdrive an amp. That’s where it gets murky, as most of the pedals termed “overdrive pedal” function as a combination of both overdrive AND distortion."


this is crap. beware of anything telling you 'this is supposed to do this so this is actually one of these, and here is some rule of thumbs' because they make all that shit up. there is no ruling body that decides what a distortion pedal or an overdrive pedal is, if anyone wants to 'really' tell you what that stuff is then they are just making shit up and trying to make it sound good.

at the very most that little quote segment is just someone BS opinion on what the difference between an OD, boost and distortion pedal is.

i'll repeat: there is NOTHING official out there to rigorously define the difference, therefore any opinion on the definitions are just that: opinions

the difference between a boost and an overdrive is mainly historical baggage. pedals that call themselves OD's lend their heritage toward pedals that labeled themselves as OD's, same with boosts, fuzzes and distortion pedals...

anyone that reads more into it is making stuff up, pretty anti-climatic answer huh?
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
Last edited by gumbilicious at Aug 3, 2013,
#4
Quote by gumbilicious
this is crap. beware of anything telling you 'this is supposed to do this so this is actually one of these, and here is some rule of thumbs' because they make all that shit up. there is no ruling body that decides what a distortion pedal or an overdrive pedal is, if anyone wants to 'really' tell you what that stuff is then they are just making shit up and trying to make it sound good.

at the very most that little quote segment is just someone BS opinion on what the difference between an OD, boost and distortion pedal is.

i'll repeat: there is NOTHING official out there to rigorously define the difference, therefore any opinion on the definitions are just that: opinions

the difference between a boost and an overdrive is mainly historical baggage. pedals that call themselves OD's lend their heritage toward pedals that labeled themselves as OD's, same with boosts, fuzzes and distortion pedals...

anyone that reads more into it is making stuff up, pretty anti-climatic answer huh?


I couldn't disagree more. It may help clarify if you read the 2 paragraphs before what was posted.

"First, let’s look at the two terms, but from the perspective of an amplifier. The simplest explanation I could come up with is that overdrive, or in audiophile terms, over-powering, occurs when input gain exceeds the capacity of a device to handle the amount of gain thrown at it; in our case, a tube. What happens is that the smooth wave form that goes into the device gets “clipped” because the device’s input capacity is less than what is being thrown at it. Sonically, we perceive the result of this clipping as distortion. The higher the amplitude of the wave, the greater amount of distortion we hear.

But what about pedals? I’ll get to that in a bit, but I wanted to take time to clarify these terms. There’s been a lot of confusion about these two terms because they’re used so loosely, and oftentimes interchangeably. For me, I’ll stick with the audiophile’s perspective of overdrive in that distortion is the result of overdrive or over-powering an amplification device. A way to think about overdrive vs. distortion is that overdrive happens in the front-end (what you put in), while distortion happens on the back-end (what you hear)."


The author of this article is speaking technical facts, not his opinion.
Last edited by psrj32 at Aug 3, 2013,
#5
quote simply, an overdrive will have a gain control and impart clipping into the signal via a circuit. it has a level too, generally controlled by a curcuit based "op amp" i believe, so yes you can turn the gain low and output up. this is just another use case.

a boost pedal by definition imparts no clipping or crunch. it is gain in the form of 100% clean output of a boosted line. HOWEVER, these days people are tweaking pedals so that boosts have EQs, mid boost, treble boost, etc.

________

so, yes, you can technically push an amp into crunch with a boost, but it will be completely based on the guitar, the boost, and settings on the amp, and headroom of the preamp. if you have a 100 watt amp that is dead clean, a boost is probably going to just make a clean tone louder no matter what. it is very specific to user preference.

what tuner are you using? and your second pedal isa BOSS. now we are getting into a true bypass / buffer debate. in my opinio i would say take the micro amp out of the middle of the chain and its serving no purpose, you are most likely using op amps / buffers in your boss pedal turning your signal into low impetance and you should have no issues running you relatively small chain.

if you like your micro amp, its most likely for some small, non transparent, tone changing ability OR you just really like a hotter signal. thats it. but i really doubt it is remedying a weak signal.

lastly, you have a lot of very redundant pedals (4 ods and 2 boosts). cant you answer this question yourself?

this makes me ask you - WHAT AMP DO YOU HAVE? if you have a solid state amp, the effect of an OD or boost is blurred, cause you cant get preamp tube breakup.
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#6
Quote by psrj32
The author of this article is speaking technical facts, not his opinion.

Actually, no, not quite. He's speaking technical facts from a different field, but then it falls flat when he tries to correlate those facts to pedal nomenclature, because there's no good reason to use those same terms across both circumstances.

Here's the problem. He's going by hi-fi/audiophile terms, which are all well and good, but in that world, distortion is a dirty word. So they don't have the appropriate language to describe these devices that actually purposefully produce distortion. In hi-fi, all you have to say is that overdrive creates distortion, so distortion is just a passive trait. It isn't something you add; it just happens as a result of something else.

So, once you try to make 'distort' a desired outcome, rather than the passive result of something, you can't use that system of description any more, because it doesn't make sense. Any pedal with any sort of boost can overdrive an amp, so that term becomes too vague. On top of that, almost any boost/od/distortion pedal will introduce some distortion on its own if you turn it up, or hit it with another pedal, or EMGs, so you'd have to call any boost pedal a distortion too, because it does introduce distortion. So perhaps you can see how this system doesn't work for guitarists. It is unusable because the system it was meant for has completely the opposite set of priorities. When a hi-fi person talks about distortion, they don't often need to talk about 'how much' or what particular type of clipping is happening; they just need to say that it's there, so they can remove it and move along. When you actually want distortion, you have to start describing it in more nuanced terms, so the original set of terms is too vague.

So, no, I don't think that article actually helps at all. He's describing a totally different system and if you try to actually make it work in practical terms, it falls flat because it just doesn't translate. Saying that distortion is the result of overdrive is useless if you want to put a pedal in one of those camps. It's not technically wrong, it's just useless.

This is why guitarists use terms like gain, distortion, and overdrive "incorrectly." The traditional terms don't work for our purposes, so we have to subvert them for our own purposes. The person who wrote the article doesn't seem to understand that.

TL;DR: In hi-fi, distortion and overdrive are treated so differently that using their terms for our purposes is not descriptive enough to be useful.
#7
^ +1 (and also to gumbi)

You could possibly make a very vague, rule of thumb generalisation in that overdrive pedals tend to have less distortion/soft clipping/a smoother sound (which is often produced by having the diodes in the op-amp's feedback loop, but not always) and that distortion pedals have more distortion/hard clipping/a harsher and edgier sound (which is often produced by having the diodes shunted to ground, but again far from always).

And then differentiate boosts as being pedals which don't have any clipping circuit (or some form of master volume where they can generate their own distortion at low volumes) built into them, as opposed to od and distortion pedals, which are normally capable of boosting your signal, but which also normally have a clipping circuit built into them (or a master volume to enable clipping at low volumes).

But that's very much more a very general rule of thumb than a hard and fast rule, as there are almost as many exceptions as there are examples which fit the rule.

really it's the kind of thing that once you get used to pedals it's pretty obvious what type of pedal a particular pedal is (apart from the few pedals which genuinely do overlap), and trying to define them is pretty hard.

it's that "what's a superstrat?" thread all over again, lol. Show us a pedal and we can tell you if it's a boost, an overdrive or a distortion (or somewhere in between). Tell us to define exactly what makes a pedal a boost, an overdrive or a distortion and it's much more difficult.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#8
Quote by ikey_
if you have a 100 watt amp that is dead clean, a boost is probably going to just make a clean tone louder no matter what.


What does the wattage of the power amp have to do with boosting the preamp?

For practical purposes, boosts are the same as overdrives, just without the ability to create their own distortion (though I'm sure there are exceptions; boosts that do add a bit of their own grit). Going further into detail about this should be reserved for TGP.
Kenneth
#10
Exactly. How could you possibly try to force these pedals into rigid, rule-based roles when their effect can be completely changed by a pedal in front of it or the amp behind it?
#11
Quote by gumbilicious
this is crap. beware of anything telling you 'this is supposed to do this so this is actually one of these, and here is some rule of thumbs' because they make all that shit up. there is no ruling body that decides what a distortion pedal or an overdrive pedal is, if anyone wants to 'really' tell you what that stuff is then they are just making shit up and trying to make it sound good.

at the very most that little quote segment is just someone BS opinion on what the difference between an OD, boost and distortion pedal is.

i'll repeat: there is NOTHING official out there to rigorously define the difference, therefore any opinion on the definitions are just that: opinions

the difference between a boost and an overdrive is mainly historical baggage. pedals that call themselves OD's lend their heritage toward pedals that labeled themselves as OD's, same with boosts, fuzzes and distortion pedals...

anyone that reads more into it is making stuff up, pretty anti-climatic answer huh?



Hi, Gump. Reading into many of these great responses,
I get a feeling or understanding that boost pedals "amplify"
the input signal, and keeps the input signal clean with no clipping.

Reading more into these comments (and other reads), it seems like
an overdrive pedal takes the input signal, wildly jacks it up, and puts
limits or clips the signal at both the high and low signal wave ends.

Distortion pedals generate distortion by their designed internal circuitry
and then outputs that designed distorted sound..


A few friends only use two to four pedals and brag about it.
Some friends are like me ~ experimenting with a ton of foot toys
and enjoy the hell out of it. I'm the guy thinking ~ lightly boost
the guitar signal at the front end of a chain, just enough boost
to drive the guitar signal through all other pedals and use another
device later in the chain (boost or overdriver) to amplify solo leads.
#12
Your overdrive description would be just as apt for distortion. Overdrive pedals can be used without any clipping at all. In fact most people do use them this way (tubescreamer). There are boost pedals that clip the signal as well. I feel like you have a compulsion to define things. Also I'm not trying to be rude or confrontational, in case it came out that way.
RG351DX - Bridge Dragonfire Screamer, Mid+Neck Fender Hot Noiseless
Peavey Valveking 112 - Eminence GB128
AMT E1 > Joyo AC Tone > Dan'o EQ > Shimverb > Digidelay
#13
Quote by NakedInTheRain
for less than the price of the above pedals combined, you could've bought an arc effects klone.



Little research. Seems like a great pedal.
Of the above pedals, I am using the Micro Amp
as a front end "slight boost" when I have a lot
of pedals attached and even if they all have 'true bypass".

Then, I could down the road use the Arc Effects booster ~ they have several,
instead of the MXR M-77 Custom Badass Modified O.D. Pedal.

Also, I'm building, testing and experimenting with two pedalboards . . . .
one for 1980s & 1990s stomp-box pedals made byBOSS MXR DOD pedals.
The other experimental pedalboard is made up of pedals with two 12AX7 tubes
such as EHX's Black Finger, Tube Zipper, Hot Tubes;
the Nady TTV Dual 12AX7 Tremolo box; and some other new pedals I just got in:
Morpheus Bomber Polyphonic Pitch Shifter, T-REX Octavius,
BOSS RT20 Rotary Leslie Speaker pedal, and a ton of distortion pedals.
#14
Quote by tas38
Your overdrive description would be just as apt for distortion. Overdrive pedals can be used without any clipping at all. In fact most people do use them this way (tubescreamer). There are boost pedals that clip the signal as well. I feel like you have a compulsion to define things. Also I'm not trying to be rude or confrontational, in case it came out that way.


Thanks. I have some pedals. Just wondering what other UG'ers do.
Having fun experimenting. Cheers.
#15
I think he knows.

I think he's a multi.

Can I use an overdrive as a wah?
Is it possible to use my amp as a pick?
If I get a Moog Ring Modulator will it make me sterile?
How many people were involved in the production of my pedal?
Who invented the FIRST EVER guitar?
If I make a guitar of my own can I call it Stella?
Does Barack Obama like thrash metal?
Does Barack Obama use a Tubescreamer?
What kind?
Does he stack them?
Does anyone have his number?


Last edited by Mephaphil at Aug 4, 2013,
#17
Quote by Mephaphil
Can I bust a overdrive as a wah, biatch?
Is it possible ta bust mah amp as a pick, biatch?
If I git a Moog Rin Modulator will it make me sterile, biatch?
How tha **** nuff playas was involved up in tha thang of mah pedal, biatch?
Dum diddy-dum, here I come biaaatch! Who tha **** invented tha FIRST EVER guitar, biatch?
If I cook up a boombox of mah own can I call it Stella, biatch?
Does Barack Obizzay like thrash metal, biatch?
Does Barack Obizzay bust a Tubescreamer, biatch?
What kind, biatch?
Does da perved-out mutha****a stack them, biatch?
Does mah playas have his number, biatch?



fixed.
#19
Quote by gumbilicious
this is crap. beware of anything telling you 'this is supposed to do this so this is actually one of these, and here is some rule of thumbs' because they make all that shit up. there is no ruling body that decides what a distortion pedal or an overdrive pedal is, if anyone wants to 'really' tell you what that stuff is then they are just making shit up and trying to make it sound good.

at the very most that little quote segment is just someone BS opinion on what the difference between an OD, boost and distortion pedal is.

i'll repeat: there is NOTHING official out there to rigorously define the difference, therefore any opinion on the definitions are just that: opinions

the difference between a boost and an overdrive is mainly historical baggage. pedals that call themselves OD's lend their heritage toward pedals that labeled themselves as OD's, same with boosts, fuzzes and distortion pedals...

anyone that reads more into it is making stuff up, pretty anti-climatic answer huh?


+1
agree..
#20
Quote by psrj32
I couldn't disagree more. It may help clarify if you read the 2 paragraphs before what was posted.

stuff

The author of this article is speaking technical facts, not his opinion.


no, it's still reads like someone's opinion to me, where did he pull all this from? some CFR, code or guideline? no, he's just using a bunch of technical words to make his opinion sound more important than yours regardless of the content of the first couple paragraphs.

maybe you should reread my post, let that soak in a bit.

Quote by Dave_Mc
it's that "what's a superstrat?" thread all over again, lol.


exactly, like there is a governing body that certifies super strats. like super strat isn't something we just make up in our head.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
Last edited by gumbilicious at Aug 4, 2013,
#21
yeah

I still say that some categorising is useful, just for handiness. For example if I want somethign to give me a little bit of grit I don't want to buy a metalzone by mistake. But as long as people realise that they're fairly arbitrary distinctions, as you said.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#22
Quote by Dave_Mc
yeah

I still say that some categorising is useful, just for handiness. For example if I want somethign to give me a little bit of grit I don't want to buy a metalzone by mistake. But as long as people realise that they're fairly arbitrary distinctions, as you said.


agreed, there is quite a bit of usefulness to it. for example, if you want a 'superstrat' you have some guidelines to go by or if you want an OD to push you amp then it is also useful to have a series of pedals called 'ODs' to choose from.

but it is really starting to wear on me when people start pointlessly long heated arguments about subjects that don't even have clear definitions to begin with. hearing self-appointed 'experts' talk about the absolutes and defining characteristics of poorly defined concepts is tiresome and unnecessary.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#23
agreed
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#24
I think it's fine to define all of them. The designers of the pedals designate them as different things so why can't we? They design each a different way. Just because you use tube screamer for just a boost doesn't mean it's not an overdrive pedal? You can use any pedal for a boost. You can even use a reverb or delay pedal as a boost if you really want to. If you don't use gain on a pedal doesn't mean it doesn't exist and was designed not to be used. Using one channel of an amp doesn't make it single-channel amp.
#25
That's not the issue, though. Of course it makes sense to have a label on a pedal so you can have some idea of what its primary function might be. What we're having a problem with is the idea that you can use some set of rules to pigeonhole every pedal in existence, especially if those rules aren't well suited to describing what they actually do.

That's what the first post dealt with. Defining them all as defined categories and not individually by use.
#26
Reading some of the fine responses . . . . .

Boost pedals many have OverDrive possibilities.
OverDrive pedals not only have some Boost features,
but OverDrive also has some Distortion features.
All can be dialed in or out.


Distortion, by it's natural circuit design, will distort all input signals
before the signal leaves outputted out -haha


Question: if any of my misunderstanding above is near accurate,
why not have a strong Boost pedal and a great Distortion pedal
and totally ignore OverDrive pedals as the OverDrive would not be needed. Right?
#27
What? An overdrive typically is a lower distortion pedal. People normally run them fairly clean and sometimes add a bit of distortion from the pedal itself for colour. I personally would have no use for a distortion pedal per se but I run two overdrives and a boost in the form of an EQ pedal. In my case it's a distortion pedal that isn't needed which is why I don't have one..
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My band
#28
Because boosts and overdrives work with an existing tone. Distortion covers it up and turns it into something else. If you like the tone you get from your amp, there's no reason to use a distortion pedal unless you want something different. But if you want more or slightly different, that's where overdrives and boosts come in.
#29
All boosts, overdrives and distortions are similar circuits that are designed for different, yet similar, applications. They all boost your signal. "boosts" are "clean" because they are designed to only amplify the signal and add the least amount of clipping as possible. Overdrives tend to have "soft clipping" adding to a more "organic" distortion. While "distortion" pedals have "hard clipping" which add to their grittier, harder sound. It's really all in the circuit design. But it's all the same thing.
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pedals
#30
^^ a tubescreamer changes your tone a lot more than a lot of distortion pedals. a rat (or even a ds1) with its gain set low is more transparent than a tubescreamer, by some margin.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#31
Quote by JELIFISH19
Because boosts and overdrives work with an existing tone. Distortion covers it up and turns it into something else. If you like the tone you get from your amp, there's no reason to use a distortion pedal unless you want something different. But if you want more or slightly different, that's where overdrives and boosts come in.



Thanks. I like my amp's original tones, but am messin' around
with various distortion pedals for Death & Heavy metal sounds.

But, this page is about boost pedals and overdrive pedals.

My initial question is if anyone has tried using a boost pedal or Micro Amp
type pedal at the front end of a chain (near the guitar), and just kept it on
at a low output to keep a constant boost of the guitar signal through the chain?


I do this and do like the added bit of boost before other pedals
. . . . . I'm using a lot of pedals to screw around and experiment with,
not all "on" at once.


What I have found is to add a second boost or overdrive pedal in the middle
of the chain and kept off until I want a lead solo boost.

This is a cool thing, adding the low-volume clean MXR MC-401 CSE Boost/Line Driver
that's set constantly at a low setting driving the guitar signal through the chain.
Then, having the MXR MC-401 Custom Audio Electronics Boost/Line Driver
in the middle, typically off until the need for a lead/solo boost. Works for me.
#32
Quote by LaidBack
All boosts, overdrives and distortions are similar circuits that are designed for different, yet similar, applications. They all boost your signal. "boosts" are "clean" because they are designed to only amplify the signal and add the least amount of clipping as possible. Overdrives tend to have "soft clipping" adding to a more "organic" distortion. While "distortion" pedals have "hard clipping" which add to their grittier, harder sound. It's really all in the circuit design. But it's all the same thing.



LaidBack. Very well worded. Thanks.]
No clipping = boost pedal
Soft clipping = overdrive pedal
Hard clipping = distortion pedal


Back to my above post . . . .
Start my chain with a "no-clipping" boost pedal just after my tuner and NS-2
simply to add some amplification of my initial guitar signal through a large chain.

Later in the middle of the chain, use a "soft clipping" overdrive pedal
to amplify for solos/leads.

Add distortion pedals later and as desired.

Thanks for the help to better understand boost and overdrive
#33
Quote by Toppscore
Start my chain with a "no-clipping" boost pedal just after my tuner and NS-2
simply to add some amplification of my initial guitar signal through a large chain.

to be honest, you're better off just turning up your amp to the volume you want, and using it at that level. i did the always-on boost for a while, and it just adds complications.
#34
Quote by Toppscore
LaidBack. Very well worded. Thanks.]
No clipping = boost pedal
Soft clipping = overdrive pedal
Hard clipping = distortion pedal


Back to my above post . . . .
Start my chain with a "no-clipping" boost pedal just after my tuner and NS-2
simply to add some amplification of my initial guitar signal through a large chain.

Later in the middle of the chain, use a "soft clipping" overdrive pedal
to amplify for solos/leads.

Add distortion pedals later and as desired.

Thanks for the help to better understand boost and overdrive


Close. Not that a boost doesn't clip, but they're (mostly) designed to amplify the signal as much as possible, providing the boost, without adding clipping/distortion/dirt. But if that's how you want to look at it, that's fine. Good example: the EHX LPB-1 is a boost that can get pretty gritty.
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#35
Quote by Toppscore
LaidBack. Very well worded. Thanks.]
No clipping = boost pedal
Soft clipping = overdrive pedal
Hard clipping = distortion pedal


that would be correct if you ignore all the exceptions (and there are a considerable amount of exceptions).
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