#1
Hi,

I've been offered a job teaching in a local music shop, and the owner wants me to sign a "non-compete" agreement. It contains the following:

1) I can't 'steal' any students from the shop and teach them privately

2) I can't teach for any other company in a 15 mile radius (I can still teach privately) for the duration of my employment AND two years following termination from the company.

The first part of the contract makes sense; no stealing students. But being restricted from working for another company two years after leaving? Is this normal/reasonable?

Any insight is much appreciated, especially from current/former teachers who have worked for a small shop. Is this a normal agreement?
#3
Sounds exclusive. You should ask them for twice the pay they're offering.
BOOM-SHAKALAKALAKA-BOOM-SHAKALAKUNGA
#8
Speak to a teaching union about the contract. You will need to be in a union when you're working anyway.
#9
Quote by mpatton
being restricted from working for another company two years after leaving

Ahhhh, yeah...any judge would throw out such a bullshit "contract" that prevents you from getting more work in what you're skilled in...I feel that the contract you have stated seems to say a lot about the shady-doings of this business.

If they want to fire you and prevent you from getting a job doing something similar, they should have to pay you unemployment for 2 years. That's fair.
#10
Quote by Mistress_Ibanez
Speak to a teaching union about the contract. You will need to be in a union when you're working anyway.

He might be American, and that's pretty much the only way such an anti-worker contract would stand.

He's also teaching privately, there won't be a union, nor could I see a business offering this contract dealing with a union.


OP:
Step one: Check what the statutory law regarding employment contracts are in your area. There are some rights that you should have automatically, there are other things that therefore cannot be in the contract (e.g. banning you from certain types of work for X number of years). They can write whatever they want on a contract but it cannot violate your statutory rights, don't be bullied.

Step one (B): If you cannot find out this information, or don't know how to understand it, this may require you to get help from someone who can/does. This may be your representative, a lawyer friend, or a trade union official. It is important that you're aware of this stuff because while this contract would be illegal where I'm from it may not be that way in your jurisdiction.

Step two: Sign whatever you like. If the contact is bullshit and illegal anyway it doesn't matter, it will not be enforceable. This is the most likely case, companies often make people sign illegal contracts in the hopes that naive young people will abide by them regardless. Let the company think they've fooled you then do whatever you like regardless.


However, if it turns out that this kind of bullshit is allowed where you live, then do not sign it unless you feel confident that either the company would not pursue you later, or that you could put pressure on them not to do so by going to media with their frankly disgusting work conditions.
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-Ronald Reagan

"Knowledge is in every country the surest basis of public happiness."
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