#1
Mine has to be Scriabin, aka Skrjabin, aka Skryabin aka however the **** you want to spell his name? Why? Well, let me tell you. POLYPHONY. THATS WHY!

Seriously, if you love counterpoint then you will love scriabin. Also, his late era works, particularly the 9th and 10th sonatas.... are sooo ****ing cool.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FvtyobSDcw8

Only thing I dislike about him? It is hard as SHIT to play. But anyways, who do you guys have a passion for listening to and promoting?
#4
Maximo Diego Pujol and Heitor Villa-Lobos had really unique styles, lots of interesting melodies in their guitar pieces
#5
John Dowland and Eric Whitacre. Why? I like their style.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

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#6
I've only recently started biting into Classical music. I love the orchestral stuff I've heard from Debussy, namely Prelude a l'Apres-Midi d'un Faune, but I swiped a Ravel CD and absolutely loved Assez Vif
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZhN0RRlLhDg
Certainly in the beginning, it just sounds so chirpy!
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#8
My pick is Beethoven. At present this is a totally unfair pick because I've listened to his oeuvre much more extensively than any other composer. But the reason I have listened to Beethoven so extensively is because of his apparent mastery of form. If you take the first movement of the Eroica, for example, a typical performance might last ~20 minutes, but it never really feels that long. Whereas a lesser composer might have padded the work out just to make it seem like a big imposing movement, Beethoven makes it feel like the succession of musical events is nigh on inevitable, everything following logically from everything else. That judgement is a cliche, but not an unjustified one to my ears. One can also hear this mastery in his ability to take a seemingly banal subject, a famous example would the one that opens in the second movement of the seventh symphony, and through development and contextualisation, make it something interesting and engaging.

There are other things that are kind of cool about Beethoven. He gives a much more integral role to the wind and brass and his orchestral textures tend to sound more colourful than Haydn and Mozart as a result. Actually Beethoven is the earliest symphonist I really care about to be honest. Mozart's last three are pretty good but the rest don't do anything for me, and Haydn has his moments, but I've never really gotten the feeling that what I'd really rather be doing right now is listening to a Haydn symphony. The virtuosity of his piano writing in comparison to other composers of the time deserves a mention.

It also has to be said, I think much of Beethoven's music has great emotional power and impact when heard. I find it aesthetically 'beautiful'.
.
#9
Mozart is the king of composers, IMO.
I even named my dog after him.
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#10
If it was any surprise to anybody at all, my favorite composer is Gustav Mahler. I've listened to all of his works, I've seen quite a few of them performed, and I've studied the scores to even more of his works.

I love his works because he treats every instrument as a valuable part of the ensemble, because his themes and his modulations are just some of the cleverest things I've ever heard. If I could write just the first theme and harmony to the third movement of the second symphony, I would gladly quit composing, because it would be the greatest thing I ever wrote.

A conductor whom I was not a fan of, but had some good ideas nonetheless, told me once, "That true genius is judged by the quality of a composer's harmony."
Strauss!
"I am hitting my head against the walls, but the walls are giving way." - Gustav Mahler.

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#11
Quote by Nietsche
My pick is Beethoven. At present this is a totally unfair pick because I've listened to his oeuvre much more extensively than any other composer. But the reason I have listened to Beethoven so extensively is because of his apparent mastery of form. If you take the first movement of the Eroica, for example, a typical performance might last ~20 minutes, but it never really feels that long. Whereas a lesser composer might have padded the work out just to make it seem like a big imposing movement, Beethoven makes it feel like the succession of musical events is nigh on inevitable, everything following logically from everything else. That judgement is a cliche, but not an unjustified one to my ears. One can also hear this mastery in his ability to take a seemingly banal subject, a famous example would the one that opens in the second movement of the seventh symphony, and through development and contextualisation, make it something interesting and engaging.

There are other things that are kind of cool about Beethoven. He gives a much more integral role to the wind and brass and his orchestral textures tend to sound more colourful than Haydn and Mozart as a result. Actually Beethoven is the earliest symphonist I really care about to be honest. Mozart's last three are pretty good but the rest don't do anything for me, and Haydn has his moments, but I've never really gotten the feeling that what I'd really rather be doing right now is listening to a Haydn symphony. The virtuosity of his piano writing in comparison to other composers of the time deserves a mention.

It also has to be said, I think much of Beethoven's music has great emotional power and impact when heard. I find it aesthetically 'beautiful'.


Exactly my thoughts but more eloquently stated.

I'd also say Beethoven is a favorite because of the defiance for convention and he gives the listener the sense the work is moving in one direction, when in fact is it moving in another.

That and his motivic development is extraordinary. The unusual rhythms, in my opinion, seems to connect more with me, as opposed to works that have a strong melody.

I also admire Scriabin. He, like Beethoven, seemed to be in constant search for a higher level of maturity and a more individualized sound.
#12
@The guy who posted Ravel's String Quartet, this man knows what's up.

My favourite composer is Webern. lol take that #haters.

But seriously, Webern is brilliant. He says more in an instant than most composers can say in a lifetime. The density of his music is incomparable. Each and every note is loaded with expression and perfection. Each and every note has a purpose that is clear and no note is wasted. His music is so intense it rips me to attention more than anyone else. There is a level of elegance and beauty that I can't find anywhere else. He just got it. He utilized timbres and register as motivic constructs, but never lost the significance of pitch, rhythm and form. He never repeats himself because he doesn't have to, he says all he needs to say the first time around. Nothing is consequent of what happened before because it doesn't have to be, it exists only within itself, and yet it seems to flow perfectly from one note to the next, one phrase to the next.

I leave you with this.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EurYXlCVBcc
#13
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
@The guy who posted Ravel's String Quartet, this man knows what's up.

I have no idea, I am currently in the process of learn what is 'up' As it happens, my mum seems to know what's up, I told her I was looking into classical music, and she gave me the Ravel CD, as well as Shostakovich, Prokofiev, Beethoven, Faure, and Walton. Besides that, I quite like Debussy and Liszt. The stuff posted in this thread so far is great, too!
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