#1
That crackled distressing of the finish.

Under "normal" use and storage.

Or, is this effect not always guaranteed and some form of extreme exposure is required for the finish to check?
#2
It can take years, it depends on the type of nitro and the agents in it.

Some you can put it in a freezer and take it out and it'll do it, some won't. Or leave it outside in winter and then bring it indoors.

What guitar and year model do you have?
#3
My LP I had was checking in 3 yrs, but it was stolen and left in the rain. So that is an extreme example
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Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
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#4
it depends on the finish.

most modern "nitro" finishes have plasticizers in them to prevent the finish from becoming brittle and checking.

it also depends on what you call "normal" conditions.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#5
Quote by Axe Murderer
That crackled distressing of the finish.

Under "normal" use and storage.

Or, is this effect not always guaranteed and some form of extreme exposure is required for the finish to check?


No guarantees. My '67 335-12 has been around the world twice with me in this funky (and now finally falling apart) original Gibson Cardboard case and has very mild and difficult to see checking and some yellowing of the finish.

#6
Quote by gregs1020
it depends on the finish.

most modern "nitro" finishes have plasticizers in them to prevent the finish from becoming brittle and checking.
.


They've always had that -- it's really just a combination of solvents that are supposed to impede the drying process. Unfortunately, it also makes for a crappy finish in terms of protecting the guitar. And eventually it does get brittle and checks anyway.
#7
Quote by dspellman
They've always had that


Not as much, the finish in the 50s/60s used to fade and check in the shop window, the finish now is much more durable, it would take extreme conditions to check.

The agents within the finish have changed, it's still a nitrocellulose finish, but not the same as the one of old.
#8
Quote by Mephaphil
It can take years, it depends on the type of nitro and the agents in it.

Some you can put it in a freezer and take it out and it'll do it, some won't. Or leave it outside in winter and then bring it indoors.

What guitar and year model do you have?



59 Sonic blue AVRI Strat. The finish is very soft! I noticed small chips and mild flaking on the paint and couldn't figure how it got there. Then I realized it was the metal grommet of my strap hitting the body when I would hang it on its stand.

I dont want to force the process, but wasnt sure it would occur either. I really like the effect.
#9
I have the 56 in white! I can tell you how mine is wearing.

Any kind of knock will chip it, you'll find it very difficult to keep it pristine as strumming is starting to wear at the finish of mine with visible scratches. I've had it 6 months maybe.

It's not the same as an old nitro finish and it seems like it'll wear faster, so in this case, with this finish I think that it probably would check quite easily.



Last edited by Mephaphil at Aug 6, 2013,
#10
Depends on a lot of things... the wood, the chemical makup of the finish, and probably most importantly changes in climate... heat/cold, humidity... anything that causes the wood to swell and shrink will cause checking....
#11
Quote by stormin1155
Depends on a lot of things... the wood, the chemical makup of the finish, and probably most importantly changes in climate... heat/cold, humidity... anything that causes the wood to swell and shrink will cause checking....


It's not even a wood thing. Friend of mine had a '68 (actually, still does) back in Iowa. He went home after a gig half in the bag, decided he needed sleep and left the gear in the car trunk overnight. Temperature dropped well below zero. When he was pulling the gear out, the next day, he dropped the guitar case butt first on the ground (I think he was still hung over). He hauled the guitar in the house (which was probably 78 degrees), popped open the case and discovered a spider-web of cracks that radiated from the bottom strap button up to the neck pickup. He called me over, panic stricken. By the time I got there, the guitar had warmed up, and the cracks had mostly become invisible. But within a few months, as dirt and sweat worked into the cracks, they became far more visible. He was as distressed as the finish was, for in those days checking was not the fancy fashion trend that it seems to have become and poseurs were not hoping for "mojo" to ooze from the checking and into their playing as they do now.

Nitrocellulose can easily become brittle (it is, after all, one of the first plastics). Once brittle, a sudden change in temperature, humidity or any kind of impact can initiate checking earlier than would happen under normal conditions.
#12
^^^
LOL
I enjoy learning to play, but love collecting guitars too! They are so beautiful! I in no way think an old worn guitar will make me look like a salty dog. I'd be exposed as soon as I started playing!

Mephaphil, sexy Strat! I'm all about Strats! Im jonzing for a Dakota red 65 AVRI but a Eric Johnson Strat of the same color may be the better buy. What do you think? I need to try out an EJ. The hardware is sweet, but I havent heard a demo yet that I liked. The pick ups arent really voiced as sweet as the AVRI grey bottoms to me. Have you tried an EJ sig Strat?
#14
Quote by Axe Murderer
^^^
LOL
I enjoy learning to play, but love collecting guitars too! They are so beautiful! I in no way think an old worn guitar will make me look like a salty dog. I'd be exposed as soon as I started playing!

Mephaphil, sexy Strat! I'm all about Strats! Im jonzing for a Dakota red 65 AVRI but a Eric Johnson Strat of the same color may be the better buy. What do you think? I need to try out an EJ. The hardware is sweet, but I havent heard a demo yet that I liked. The pick ups arent really voiced as sweet as the AVRI grey bottoms to me. Have you tried an EJ sig Strat?


I tried one a while ago and I thought it was pretty cool. The neck on my Strat is massive and now that I've traded my fat neck guitars in I really really notice how fat the AVRI neck is, which makes switching from guitar to guitar pretty difficult. I didn't notice it before but it's glaring at me now, which is making me look elsewhere.

I know it's a 57 profile but I can't remember how fat the profile is, I think it's pretty slim to be honest.
#15
Id like to see a side pic of your strat! I wanna see this fat neck! Whats the depth measurement?
#16
It's a 7.25 radius, so it's chunky.

Here's a picture of it next to my Tele, both pictures are taken at pretty much the same distance. You can see the difference in thickness I think.

#17
my old aria 50's RI strat has a fat assed neck on it.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#18
Hmm, ok. Looks about thesame as my American Deluxe Strat with maple neck. Fattest neck I ever held was a custom shop deluxe. That thing was. a full baseball bat with about 1/8th shaved off for the fret board. It was insane. I think Im gonna do the AVRI 65 instead of the EJ.