#1
This is something I've never been quite clear on. When naming chords, does an added 11th have to be an octave higher than a 4th? Say you have a chord with C E G F. There's a 3rd so it can't be a Csus4 so it has to be Cadd11. But what if that F is the same as the F you would play in a Csus4, or maybe it's a bass note? Would that then just make it a C/F? I know that a C11 chord would contain the 1st, 3rd, 5th, minor 7th, 9th, and 11th, which makes me think it would be higher when adding the 11th, but maybe I'm just over thinking it. Thanks!
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#2
If it's just C E G and a high F, then presumably that'd be Cadd11. If it was C E G B D F it'd be C11. If it was C E F G, with the E, F and G all next to eachother, it'd still be Cad11 and sound very muddy!

Cheers to the post below for setting me straight
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Last edited by HeretiK538 at Aug 4, 2013,
#3
It's always an add11, no matter what octave you are playing in. The order of the notes doesn't change the chord name but it doesn't sound that good if all notes are played in the same octave. "Add4" is kind of incorrect. If we had to name it an add4 when all notes were in the same octave, what if we played a chord like this: C G C E G F? Shouldn't it be called a Cadd19?
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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Aug 4, 2013,
#4
That sounds fair, I'll go with that. Cheers
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#5
Thanks for the answer, that clears it up! Except I think you mean Cadd18 not add19...
The devil tuned this guitar, that's why it sounds like hell.

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#6
Just as an added bonus:

The reason those extensions are referred to as 9th, 11ths, or 13ths is because a chord is defined as a stack of 3rd intervals. Once you reach the 7th there's no other third above that in the first octave so you take the 2nd of the next octave which forms a 9th from the root hence the naming convention.
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#7
C/F is a Cadd11, it just gives you different information about the chord and the function of that specific voicing.

Slash chords indicate a function, namely a bass note (or implied bass line) other than the root. The bass voice is sacred territory, and anything other than the root should be indicated, because it really affects how a chord functions. The effect of an 11th anywhere above the root is completely different than anywhere below it. That's why C/F is a kind of Cadd11, but should be indicated specifically.

but outside of slash chords, finding new ways to stack your extended harmonies is a very fun can of worms. You can get some really interesting sounds by burying your 9ths and 11ths right in the middle of a chord. You can also get interesting sounds by substituting voices (9th instead of root, 11/13 instead of 5, etc).
Last edited by cdgraves at Aug 7, 2013,
#9
Quote by Sean0913
C11 would be in the dominant family and have a Bb not a B


True that. I think in my original post I said minor 7th but maybe it got lost along the way.

Thanks everyone for the great info!
The devil tuned this guitar, that's why it sounds like hell.

Check out my blog at TheDevilTunedThisGuitar.BlogSpot.com