#1
I've never played guitar before but I'm gonna try to learn.

Guitar hero is what got me interested. I played it for a while and improved until i was decent at it. I was getting close to being able to beat "One" on hard mode. (Metallica) So i wasn't a pro at the game by any means but i did good enough to gather a crowd at a party one time and that stuck with me. I think i liked being in front of people.

I told this to my best friend. He plays the bass (and plays it very well) in a band and he was happy for me but i knew that he didn't respect the fake plastic guitar and the more i thought about it the more i agreed with him. It does seem pretty stupid to practice playing a fake instrument.

Well i put the logical next step on hold while i went to college, but school will be done in october and i think i'm ready for the real deal now. I'm not entirely starting from scratch. I had my uncle's acoustic guitar when i was younger but he didn't give me much instruction and he didn't tell me that the bridge nut was cracked. I have come to realize that the guitar was not the easiest guitar to learn on. The action was very high and it buzzed all the time. (I wonder if it was supposed to have had those metal strings on it too.) I had 3 chords to practice but that was about it. No songs, no idea that tablature existed. I think a more driven person would've solved all of those problems but i wasn't like that when i was young.

I'm 33 (almost 34!) and i have two kids now and I feel that it's important that i try to introduce them to a musical instrument. I also can't help thinking about how good it felt to have everyone's attention on me at the party. I don't have any professional aspirations but i'd like to be able to play some songs reasonably well. If i get good enough to play my part while my best friend plays bass i think i'd be a happy man.

So i've got a plan in place. I'm buying rocksmith for my xbox and i'm gonna use that as my tutor. I've also got an offer from my brother-in-law and he's going to let me borrow his American made Fender Stratocaster. I will eventually (xmas maybe) be buying a guitar of my own but i can't turn down a real strat in the meantime. I think i'll be getting started next weekend. I'm excited.

You guys have helped me out quite a bit already. I've been using the search feature pretty liberally to educate myself. I am happy to inform you that i won't be posting a "which guitar is best for a noob?" Thread. (I know you get lots of those already.) I figure i'll have an idea of what i like soon enough. The strat i'll be playing is a Lone Star from 96 or 97 and it has the HSS pickups. I think i listen to more LP players overall (slash, grohl) but i have always been into the RHCP and if i'm not mistaken Frusciante plays a strat and this particular guitar should be pretty nice for funk sounds, am i right?

Well i know i've written about 7 paragraphs too much already. This week will hopefully be a quick one and then maybe i can start calling myself a beginner. Thanks again everyone. I've learned a lot here already.
#2
Wouldn't you consider having guitar lessons with a teacher?
I haven't used Rocksmith myself but nothing beats face to face tutelage. imo Rocksmith could be a great tool to have some fun and keep people motivated, but as far as actual tuition you would benefit more from human feedback.
Good luck nonetheless, and don't be afraid to ask questions in he relevant subforums (Musicians Talk and Guitar Techniques are the places to learn).
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#3
The work schedule and the kids make it tough. They're still pretty young and my wife is also working full time so there's lots of bottles and dirty diapers on my plate. Eventually I'm hoping to be working a first shift job again and by the time my 4 month-old starts wiping his own butt I'll be in better shape for some one-on-one.

I do have the expertise of my Brother in Law and my best friend. They've both offered to take care of me.

My best friend is one of those.... well I told him I liked Blackbird and he just listened to it for a minute, tried a few things and he was playing it by ear before too long. I was impressed by it. I don't know how that works - if it's maybe a talent of his or some kind of weird guitar juju that any competent player could demonstrate but it's definitely beyond my understanding.
#4
Ah, that's fair enough. Teaching yourself is definitely an option, it's pretty much what I did. With a decent book and all the utilities of the internet at your disposal it has never been easier - you have free guitar lesson articles and videos on sites like this/youtube, you can ask for help in forums, there's the biggest tab (written guitar music) archive in the world on this site, you can even have your guitar tuner bookmarked.
I'd still reccomend occasionally seeing a skilled guitarist/teacher to make sure that you're doing things right, but it sounds like your brother in law could guide you (if not, if you can find a good teacher you could seem him on a monthly basis rather than weekly, that shouldn't interfere with your obligations as much). If nothing else it saves you from developing bad habits (and playing with another guitarist is always a good thing).

oh btw, the website Justin Guitar is great for beginners, check it out.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#5
That Justin Guitar site is new to me. Bookmarked. I spent the last 20 minutes going through the introductory material and it seems to be very well done. Thank you for showing that.
#6
As a guitarist of 27 years and someone who bought Rocksmith, I would say Rocksmith is absolutely not the way to learn guitar. Granted, it's a little more realistic than Guitar Hero, but I would not consider it a good teaching tool. You're not going to have any foundation or understanding of what you're doing. You're basically going to be playing Guitar Hero with more "buttons". Make no mistake, it IS a game.

I agree with Hydra. I think an instructor is the best way to start learning now. You want to learn the guitar, not shoot for a higher score.
Certainly you can carve out a half hour a week for lessons. Around my area they're about $17 a lesson.

Well, whichever path you choose, I wish you luck!
Also remember to have patience.
And oh yeah...
Practice
Practice
Practice
When you're done with that, practice some more.
#7
Quote by TheGroundZero
As a guitarist of 27 years and someone who bought Rocksmith, I would say Rocksmith is absolutely not the way to learn guitar. Granted, it's a little more realistic than Guitar Hero, but I would not consider it a good teaching tool. You're not going to have any foundation or understanding of what you're doing. You're basically going to be playing Guitar Hero with more "buttons". Make no mistake, it IS a game.

I agree with Hydra. I think an instructor is the best way to start learning now. You want to learn the guitar, not shoot for a higher score.
Certainly you can carve out a half hour a week for lessons. Around my area they're about $17 a lesson.

Well, whichever path you choose, I wish you luck!
Also remember to have patience.
And oh yeah...
Practice
Practice
Practice
When you're done with that, practice some more.


What are your feelings about Justin Guitar as a proxy? I didn't know about the site before yesterday but I'm pretty excited about it. I've been in school almost every year since 1985 and along the way i've discovered that self-paced text courses are usually easier for me to follow than verbal instructions. Justin Guitar defaults to this style of written instruction that i prefer.
#8
I agree on the Rocksmith comments. I started learning almost 3 years ago now with an instructor. When Rocksmith came out, I used it as a motivational tool, not a learning tool (and a practice tool). I think it works well for getting familiar with the fretboard and generally wanting to play.

My main issue really is that I find I want to play Rocksmith all the time. There are so many arrangements (625) that I constantly have 75 or so arrangements that are a year old. And after a year of playing at least an hour a day, every day, you do improve on the songs (sometimes quite a lot). So there's a lot of positive reinforcement.

But with the DLC, I find I need to consciously break away from Rocksmith in order to practice techniques and learn different songs. It's one of the reasons I joined here. There are several good threads in the Techniques section on how to improve which will help wean me from Rocksmith.

Good luck and yea, practice, practice, practice...

Carl
#9
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When I started learning how to do that stuff I wasn't concentrating on technique, I was just enjoying myself. Eventually I got interested enough that it made sense to start learning the finer points but for a long time all I cared about was making the coolest drawings of ninja turtles.

I think I'll be fine in the end as long as I'm having a good time.
#10
Exciting day for me! Finally got to meet up with my brother-in-law. He let me borrow his Strat as I mentioned in the first post. He also let me borrow his amp. It's an Orange - a PiX 35 if I'm not mistaken.

Started with Justin Guitar lessons. I must say - the amount of quality material that is available on the internet is ridiculously helpful. I vaguely remember what it was like in the early 90s if you were trying to learn how to play a guitar. It all seems so much easier now.

I like to skim through all the material first when I'm starting something new. I got to the lessons about the minor pentatonic scale, the rhythm strumming exercises and the fingerstyle lessons and they each made a big impact in my understanding. I googled up a list of easy guitar tabs and it wasn't long before I was playing a (slightly pathetic) recognizable version of Tom Petty's Free Falling.

I know I've got a lot to learn. I've got roughly a bazillion chord changes to practice before I can even start to learn the intermediate stuff. All the same the instrument doesn't seem nearly as arcane as it did before. I think I can handle this.
Last edited by paul.housley.7 at Aug 19, 2013,