#1
Recently I bought an Epiphone Les Paul Gothic from a music shop. I live in the middle of nowhere (I do mean middle of nowhere) and got home before realized that even though I played this guitar at the shop for seriously like 3 hours before buying it, that somehow I missed the fact that it buzzes on the low E and the A. (don't ask). I dropped about $290 on it (bag included, etc) which was a pretty good deal for the model.

But now the buzzing is making me nuts. The shop is so far away that driving it back for work or to return would be a waste of money when factoring in gas prices.

I had new strings put on it when I bought it and I really didn't notice any buzz before I got home.

So I ask you: Is this fixable at home?

If I pluck the low E hard, it buzzes open. It noticeably buzzes up to the 5th fret, the A string to about the 6th fret. When playing heavy handed, I can hear the buzz through the amp which is driving me OCD INSANE.

I've only played strats before I bought this LP and have no idea how the mechanics on this thing work. The whole saddle setup and bridge are alien to me.

Any prognosis on what it might be?
#2
It could just be that the neck is too straight. If it buzzes on the first 6 frets or so, back the truss rod off 1/4 turn and see what happens.
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#3
Epiphone Les Paul Gothic has Tune-o-Matic bridge, which means you can always use a screwdriver to lift the bridge a little bit. I had problems with fret buzz on my Washburn and it's pretty fixable.



...it's this little fucker right here.

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#4
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
It could just be that the neck is too straight. If it buzzes on the first 6 frets or so, back the truss rod off 1/4 turn and see what happens.


+1
#5
Well if you changed the string gauge when you put new strings on it then the truss rod might have bent. Also i bought and epi les paul and i had rett buzz. it turned out to be the fretts were not all even. So i took it to a guitar technician and he fixed it. you probably wanna take it to a technician to get fixed
#6
Don't touch the truss rod unless you know what you're doing. I recommend calling a few luthiers in the area to see what they price for a set up. A lot of them are great guys who understand that you might not be able to drive out to see them. If you're honest and nice about the situation, they might be willing to give you a few pointers over the phone...but keep in mind they will not diagnose the problem without you taking the guitar in. Otherwise, consider contacting the store you bought it at.
#7
The truss rod is a user adjustable device. You have to be totally numb to do any damage using it.

Gibsons come with a truss rod wrench so you can adjust it at home. Maybe Epis do too?

Ignore anyone who says dont touch it.

All you have to do is be sensible. If you have fret buzz, this means you need more 'relief' which means you have to release some of the counter tension in the truss rod, to allow the strings to pull the neck slightly more curved, or relieved.

The rules are simple, and if you follow them, you can do no damage at all:

1. To add relief, turn the nut counter clockwise
2. Never turn it more than 1/4 turn at once, preferably 1/8 turn.
3. After turning it 1/8th, wait 1 hour to get the full effect before trying another 1/8th.
4. If you have to go more than a half turn (over a 4 hour period), then is the time to consider calling a tech.
5. If the nut comes loose before you get the relief you want, tweak back to just tight, and you have two options: try heavier strings, or call a tech.

That simple.

It's also worth keeping an eye on how much actual relief you are dialing in - you may have a lot already, and it may be high frets.

To do this, hold down the low E at the 14th fret. Hold the same string down at the 1st with your fretting hand. You should have about a business card thicknesses gap between that string and the 9th fret. If its less, the neck is too straight, and does probably need some extra relief. If its much more, you probably already have as much relief as you should need, and it may be a problem with one or two frets.

Edit

Te advice about the tunomatic bridge is valid too, but usually a too low action will cause buzzing around the high frets. See if you can pick the high e around fret 14 and do a full two tone bend without the note 'choking' against the frets. If not, your action may be just a little low, and the bridge may need to be raised.

To raise a tunomatic bridge, loosen the strings slightly and turn the screws under the bridge to raise it, then tune up again.


Note that either of these, adjusting the truss rod or the bridge, will mean you need to check the intonation.

You can find lots of stuff online about intonation, and you will need to check it every string change anyway, so it's worth looking it up.

This is all user stuff, not tech stuff, and taking a guitar to a tech to check relief, action or intonation would be like taking your car to a mechanic to fill it with petrol (or gas - but you'll notice it isn't gas, it's liquid).
Last edited by sannyasidharma at Aug 11, 2013,
#9
Bro, truss rods are EZ to work with if you're not developmentally challenged (or a bass player jk). Adjust it in quarter turns at time. After each adjustment, let it sit for a few hours so it can settle in.
I only feel like me when I'm behind my ax...
#10
Any guitarist who doesn't know the ins and outs of his instrument after a couple of years should just put it down and go home. So tinkering on your own is a very good thing so long as you don't annihilate your gear. Tons of resources available online if you're in trouble.
I only feel like me when I'm behind my ax...
#11
Any guitarist who doesn't know the ins and outs of his instrument after a couple of years should just put it down and go home. So tinkering on your own is a very good thing so long as you don't annihilate your gear. Tons of resources available online if you're in trouble.
I only feel like me when I'm behind my ax...
#12
Open string buzzing usually means the nut slot is cut too deep. If it's only on your low E, I would bet this is your issue.