#1
I've been in my current band for about eight months now and we're doing pretty good, but we're trying to improve turnouts at our shows. I talked to one of the guys in a fairly successful band in town that has been around a few years, and he told me that having great equipment was just as important as having great songs, and we should ditch our current amps and go tubed. Apparently, his band used crappy solid-state combo amps and bargain bin drums and did okay, but when they pooled all their money and bought Mesa/Boogie half stacks and had a custom drum kit made their fan base tripled, even though they were playing the same songs.

I'm sure he was exaggerating, but it did make me wonder how much of an impact having good equipment compared to GREAT equipment would have. What are your guy's opinions? Does having name brand, quality equipment make you a more likeable band? Does it make you look more professional, and therefor taken more seriously? Or does it make any difference at all?

EDIT: I put this in the bandleading forum because I am the band leader and am trying to decide if upgrading our equipment is something we need to spend a serious amount of time working on or not
Last edited by Tracii Lee at Aug 6, 2013,
#2
What are you using now? Knowing how to make youur equipment sound good also helps.
You can always spot the amatuer band because they think volume = quality.
Gear:

Gibson 2005 Les Paul Standard
Fender Road Worn Strat w/ Noiseless pickups
Marshall JCM 2000 401C
Marshall Vintage Modern 2266
Marshall 1960A cab (Dave Hill from Slade's old cab)
Ibanez TS9DX
EHX Little Big Muff
Freshman Acoustic
#3
No, gear is not as important as he made it out to be. That said, solid state distortion generally sounds like trash.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#4
Quote by ProphetToJables
What are you using now? Knowing how to make youur equipment sound good also helps.
You can always spot the amatuer band because they think volume = quality.


The rhythm guitarist uses a Crate GT212, which doesn't sound that bad, but still has that solid-state harshness to it. The lead guitarist has a Peavey Vypyr 1X12 combo that sounds terrible and half the time isn't loud enough without being miced. I have an Acoustic B200 head and B1X15 cabinet (I play bass).

We've been trying to go tubed for awhile now, but I'm the only one who pays for equipment and it's hard for one person just out of high school to supply an entire band. We have a Peavey Windsor head that goes into a Marshall 1960A and sounds great, but it has output problems and isn't reliable. We also have a ADA MP1 preamp that goes into a POD XT Live for effects and into the tube power amp of a Peavey Classic VT, but the MP1 has something wrong with it so it squeals like crazy and is completely unusable. My bass stack sounds good but has a really bad rattle when turned up.

I've saved up enough money to get this stuff fixed, but we also need to start getting merch, and we're starting to write songs that need to be copyrighted, etc.
#5
^^^ If you play high gain stuff, that setup you describe sounds awful.

Just upgade your own gear dude. I don't know why you're paying for someone elses gear.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#6
We play 80s rock, so we set the gain fairly low, but tube amps respond much differently at those gain levels. I already own everything, and I play guitar as well (just not in this band), so even if I repair the things we have and one of the guitarists uses them, it's still my amp to play with when I want, you know what I mean? I certainly would not spend money on gear if ONLY somebody else was going to use it
#7
Yeah you really need to only worry about your own gear.
Gear:

Gibson 2005 Les Paul Standard
Fender Road Worn Strat w/ Noiseless pickups
Marshall JCM 2000 401C
Marshall Vintage Modern 2266
Marshall 1960A cab (Dave Hill from Slade's old cab)
Ibanez TS9DX
EHX Little Big Muff
Freshman Acoustic
#8
So one of you actually makes some sort of concious choice to play the solid state Crate amp......

My hatred for the amps aside, it's still not your problem if the other guy couldn't be bothered saving up for something better (than a Crate).
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#9
Quote by AlanHB
So one of you actually makes some sort of concious choice to play the solid state Crate amp......

My hatred for the amps aside, it's still not your problem if the other guy couldn't be bothered saving up for something better (than a Crate).

That's a pretty valid point I suppose. I guess the way I think of it and relate it back to my initial question, is if I already own these two tubed guitar rigs that sound great and just need to be taken in for minor repairs and are just laying around not being played anyways, it'd be worth it to pay the money and let the guitarists use it because it would be for the greater good of the band, and then I could use the equipment that I've already paid for whenever I felt like it, being that it's unusable at the moment.

But then again, it's also a good point that I shouldn't have to do that just because they don't want to save up and buy their own gear. Perhaps if I'm going to have the rigs repaired and they're going to use it, maybe they could pitch in money for the repairs and everybody would be happy? Or maybe the money would be better spent elsewhere if upgrading our equipment isn't even going to affect how many fans we get and are able to draw to our live shows anyways. I'm just trying to do what ever is going to help the band overall
#10
If you want to increase turnout, you need to hit the streets and drag people to the shows. Word of mouth only goes so far.
That said, you need better gear if you want to be serious. I can't imagine a Vyper 1x12 combo is good for a gigging band.
Fix the tube amps and make the guys in the band pay for it. If they don't want to pony up, find some new guys. Believe it or not, guitar players are everywhere. A little looking and you could find people who actually care what they sound like.
Don't worry so much about what names are on the gear, just that you get a good sound.
Pay attention when you sound check, too. If something doesn't sound right, tell the engineer and try to work with him to fix it.
Tell the drummer to actually spend some money on new heads. You are not at the level where you need a custom kit, but he could get some decent heads, and maybe tune them up a little better.
Harmony: Stratocaster
Alvarez: F-200
Schecter: Omen 6
Fender: BXR-60
Dean: Metalman Z Bass (Betty)
Egnator: Tweaker 15
Pearl: Maximum
ESP/LTD: EXP-300
Custom: Harley Quinn Bass
Custom: TK-421 Explorer
A steadily growing supply of pedals
#11
Gear is absolutely as important as it's made out to be. Anyone who's ever played with a professional audio rig will tell you that. The best sounding show I've ever played was on an off day for every member of the band. We just had an excellent sound guy. As far as guitars and amps and drums go, you can sound great in the upper mid level price range, but a sound guy is a must if you want to sound great, and unfortunately they aren't cheap
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My girlfriend and her mom see each other nude daily for some weird reason
#12
To answer the original question, gear doesn't matter as much as that guy is telling you. I know people exactly like that guy, and you have to remember that most guitarists are that guy. Most people in rock bands have GAS and are begging for a reason to invest in Mesa/Boogie full stacks and custom drum kits. Remember that good songs come first, and that wearing a certain brand name isn't going to make more people like your music.

I'm not saying it's not important to have amps that sound good and get loud enough though. Upgrade if you need to, but don't fool yourself into thinking the gear makes the band like that other guy has.

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#13
Quote by AlanHB
That said, solid state distortion generally sounds like trash.

Tell that to Dimebag.
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The image in my head is just too funny for words at this point


Aw yeah.
#14
I don't think that gear matters that much, as long as you know how to get everything sounding good, then you'll be just fine. If your gear doesn't sound good though, then it's time to upgrade. I myself have a crate amp, and when you know what you're doing you sound great. I myself run my guitar through a rp500 directly into the amp. Most people will say to turn off the amplifier option on the pedal, but I leave it on anyways. I do however make sure that what I'm playing sounds good though. It's all about knowing your equipment, unless your equipment is awful on every setting you could possibly think of.
#15
It's not all that matters, but he has a little point. First of all, I buy 'expensive' gear because I love the sound of it, that's really the only thing that matters; Make yourself sound awesome... to yourself. Apart from that, when I see a band with some really nice amps, it is quite likely their sound will be good, it's more likely they know what they're doing, etc.

So keeping that in mind, I believe it may increase your following among other musicians a little (the ones that already care for gear), aesthetics-wise, but it's mainly about the image and sound you want to portray. If you like the way your amps sound and look already, more power to you.
Tell me who's that writin'...
#16
Quote by TheNameOfNoone
Tell that to Dimebag.


Someone should have because his tone was terrible.
#17
Ever notice that the people who say gear doesn't matter typically follow up that brilliant comment by listing their gear and its crappy gear? Crate, peavey, anything solid state is fine for rocking your garage. If you wanna be a big boy you gotta pay the price of admission. I got a little epiphone acoustic I love. Feels great in my hand and I play better on it. But when I play out I've got my Martin because even though I don't maneuver as well on it it sounds 10x better. I often don't bother with the pedals at home...on the road I can't imagine life without them.
#18
Quote by TheNameOfNoone
Tell that to Dimebag.

Yeah, his tone was kind of balls.


While I don't think the specifics really matter too much in regards to gear, the gear you guys have now simply will not work. People don't care too much what your gear is, although I'm sure many people will feel that you're a more successful band if you roll up with 4x12 half-stacks, all that really matters is how you sound. I would recommend everyone to invest in new gear, not just you. Get maybe tube stacks, or at least nice, loud combos. You don't need super big stacks, in my band both the other guitarist and I play through a single 2x12 each.
#19
"Does having name brand, quality equipment make you a more likeable band? Does it make you look more professional, and therefor taken more seriously?"- No. In my experience, most people who go to see bands don't know jack about equipment and don't really care. I don't believe they pay that much attention to details, anyway. Few will even notice if you muff a chord, flub a line or a note in a solo unless it's really a whopper.

As for needing stacks, people may lash me for this, but: Check out the rig Neil Young uses with Crazy Horse. It's a little Fender Princeton or some such combo amp that gets miked through the P.A., and he gets searing sound out of it. And has thousands of fans.

Best of luck to you.
#20
If you can dial in a tone that you like and, more importantly, works with the rest of the band then it does not matter what gear you have. However as a general rule; if you have top range equipment you're going to find it easier to dial in that tone.

Also, as somebody has already said, having a sound engineer makes a big difference. My band has a sound engineer. He does us a good deal, but we can't use him all the time because of cost (we don't make any money out of this venture). However he knows our tracks inside out so we sound our best when he is on board.
#21
Quote by knifeboy
"Does having name brand, quality equipment make you a more likeable band? Does it make you look more professional, and therefor taken more seriously?"- No. In my experience, most people who go to see bands don't know jack about equipment and don't really care. I don't believe they pay that much attention to details, anyway. Few will even notice if you muff a chord, flub a line or a note in a solo unless it's really a whopper.

As for needing stacks, people may lash me for this, but: Check out the rig Neil Young uses with Crazy Horse. It's a little Fender Princeton or some such combo amp that gets miked through the P.A., and he gets searing sound out of it. And has thousands of fans.

Best of luck to you.


This guy knows! My last band, the singer/rhythm guy had a 1x12 mesa combo, the lead player had a marshall head into a 2x12, and I switched between a 50 watt fender combo and a GK head with a 1x15.
Don't believe for a minute that you need to go get a 4x12 half stack or anything.
Just make sure you can be heard with the drums, they usually mic your amps anyway.
Harmony: Stratocaster
Alvarez: F-200
Schecter: Omen 6
Fender: BXR-60
Dean: Metalman Z Bass (Betty)
Egnator: Tweaker 15
Pearl: Maximum
ESP/LTD: EXP-300
Custom: Harley Quinn Bass
Custom: TK-421 Explorer
A steadily growing supply of pedals
#22
Neither of the extreme positions is true. Good gear makes a difference sure, but not as much as the professionalism and musicianship of of your band members. By and large audiences aren't impressed by big name gear, though the odd muso in the audience might comment. They will notice bad sounds, though not the details that most guitarists obsess over.

I'll give you a for instance. I'm really old and play with really old pro's. Our new guitarist turned up to his first practice recently with a new amp, a Behringer! My heart sank. His only pedal was the supplied footswitch and a tuner. I can't believe the range of tones he gets, how sweet it can sound one second and how aggressive the next. He knows what he is doing I guess and the tone is in his fingers. Forty years of gigging must count for something. He probably would sound better through an AC30 but he can coax a good tone out of what I thought would be a piece of crap.

The most important thing is that all your gear works and that you all know how to get the best out of what you have, if gear breaks down at a gig that is really going to annoy people. The next thing is the vocal sound, which is about decent mic's and PA. It's the vocals that let most low rent live bands down. The next thing is the sound balance, get that wrong and your band isn't going to sound great whatever each individual instrument sounds like.

Only then do you really need to worry about individual instrument tones.

Having great gear is about pride in what you do of course, I care enough to want the audience to hear my best and that means looking after my own sound and caring about it but there are a lot of bass players out there who sound better than me without the gear i own. You buying other people their gear won't instill that pride, it has to come from them. You already have it.

As a bandleader always solve one problem at a time and try to home in on the problems that matter most. Record your gigs and if one persons tone is a problem tackle that first.

You can't buy a great sound, for that you need practice.
#23
Quote by TheNameOfNoone
Tell that to Dimebag.



Someone should have...


From my experience, you can really hear the difference between bands with good gear and bands with not so good gear. And that is, the band with better gear will almost 100% of the time sound better.

Also, if you are going to be running tube ambs, be sure both guitarists are. Every time I see a band where one guitarist has a tube half stack and the other has a solid state you almost can never hear the solid state and it also sounds 10x more harsh than the other.
'93 Gibson LP Studio (498T/490R)-Ebony
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#24
Quote by freebeer1976
Ever notice that the people who say gear doesn't matter typically follow up that brilliant comment by listing their gear and its crappy gear? Crate, peavey, anything solid state is fine for rocking your garage. If you wanna be a big boy you gotta pay the price of admission. I got a little epiphone acoustic I love. Feels great in my hand and I play better on it. But when I play out I've got my Martin because even though I don't maneuver as well on it it sounds 10x better. I often don't bother with the pedals at home...on the road I can't imagine life without them.



If you're referring to me, actually listen to some of my songs before you say that my gear is crappy. I have a few songs on my profile on here but if you'd like a link to my soundcloud page, just let me know. I recorded all of my songs through a peavey vypyr 30 watt, with an rp500 effects unit, and I'm not going to tell you what guitars I use, because yeah, I have a few of them. My recorder is just a little handheld multi-tracker.
#25
Wow, their are a lot more diverse opinions on this than I thought there would be. I value each and everyone of your opinions and thank you all for contributing. After reading each comment, I believe the best course of action for my band to take is for the guitarist to pay for the repairs to my gear, use that for live because it does sound better. However, we should continue to practice with the gear we have so we don't use our equipment as a crutch for bad playing habits that we have, and that we should focus on having a very level and balanced sound with each set of equipment. Theirs no way we could afford a sound guy, we're about as broke as band as could be. I don't believe it will solve the problem of having low draws at our shows in any way, but it might help us gain new fans since we will sound a little better (it certainly couldn't hurt)

I also understand that this isn't a be all, end all solution and that someone with a similar problem might have different results. Again, thanks to everyone for contributing
#26
It's more about the mix than your guitar tone. Even "bad" amps can sound good enough. You can make most amps sound decent. You just need to be loud enough to be heard over a drummer and your sound needs to be clear. The audience doesn't hear the difference before you actually play through both, a good amp and a bad amp. Then they'll start noticing that one amp sounds bad and the other sounds good. I would buy the gear for me, not for the audience. Because tone is subjective. And you also want to be happy with your own tone. Because when you are completely happy with how you sound, I think you also play a bit better and really enjoy playing because you sound so good. The audience can't tell if you are playing through a digital modeling stuff or a real tube amp. It's all about the mix. You want clear and loud enough sound.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#27
Once you get some real hardware you will no longer be able to blame anything else other than yourself.
#29
Gear definitely does matter, as others have said. I remember once I had to flee the stage because both guitarists in a band were using Peavey Vypyrs, and the sound was just so harsh, so thin and the whole band sounded like absolute amateurs because of it, and I will say that I've never heard a solid state amp sound good in a live scenario. You don't need Mesas or Engls or what have you, really, a Jet City or something like that will do, but you do need to be playing with professional gear if you want to look like a professional band.
#30
Quote by Tracii Lee
And what exactly do we need to blame ourselves for?


if you think you might benefit from some quality equipment and then still suck, you will know that you can no longer blame anything other than your songs or abilities.
#31
I don't have a lot to add: better gear is better for a reason, but if you're awesome you'll sound good through mediocre gear.

But ...

I will say that if you're paying for the gear somebody else is using, whether it's buying gear for the band, or having backup gear of your own that you get repaired, or whatever - if somebody else is using your gear they you're entitled to be paid for it.

Most bands have an "everyone's responsible for their own gear" guideline, but somebody using your amp is putting wear and tear on it, which, if it were his amp, he's be expected to cover out of his share of the band's fee. How much, exactly, is up to you two to negotiate, but don't give him a free ride if you ever expect him to invest in his own gear.
#32
You need gear that makes you sound like the best possible version of you. That varies from band to band. Look at a band like Cake - they don't use huge stacks, but that's because whatever little combo amp the guitarist is using gives him the perfect tone he needs to succeed within the sound that Cake has.
So if you're a hard rock band, unless your amps just happen to have the perfect tone for your unique brand of music, you aren't going to sound as great as you should if they are lousy. If you're hoping to really move up in the musical world, the subtle difference (to a non-musician. To a musician, the difference is vast) between a solid-state amp and a good tube amp can be huge.
#33
Quote by bigblockelectra
if you think you might benefit from some quality equipment and then still suck, you will know that you can no longer blame anything other than your songs or abilities.

I see what you're saying. I don't think we suck, I think we're decent and could vastly improve, but we're also a young band that's still trying to gel with eachother. I don't expect the equipment to make us more competent musicians, I just think it would make the band sound better overall. Like listening to a CD with cheap headphones, and then listening to the same song with studio monitors. Still the same song, but it does sound better
#34
After reading a bit of this thread (i'd usually read everything but there's a lot to read, I might read it tomorrow), the first thing I thought is why are you paying to upgrade all of the bands gear? You should really just be paying to upgrade your own.

It seems a lot of stuff about expensive vs cheap gear has already been said, all I can think to add is that good gear can sound bad if you don't EQ it right, and if you mess around with cheap gear a lot you can probably get it to sound okay (depending on the sound you want).
#35
good gear is important. But expensive top of the line pro gear is not. Like if you buy a peavey classic 30, you'll never NEED to upgrade to a vox AC30. But if you have a vypyr 30, you WILL need to upgrade to that classic 30.

Also perhaps I'll come off as a jerk and perhaps I'm wrong... but if your bandmates are relying on you to furnish them with gear, it seems clear that the band will not survive very long, therefore it is NOT worth it to invest a dime in it
#36
Quote by lightdark
If you're referring to me, actually listen to some of my songs before you say that my gear is crappy. I have a few songs on my profile on here but if you'd like a link to my soundcloud page, just let me know. I recorded all of my songs through a peavey vypyr 30 watt, with an rp500 effects unit, and I'm not going to tell you what guitars I use, because yeah, I have a few of them. My recorder is just a little handheld multi-tracker.


Not sure if you were plugging those so someone could critique them, but that tone is no where as good as you made it out to be. In fact, I could tell you were using an RP from the first note, they sound bad.
Quote by ne14t
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My girlfriend and her mom see each other nude daily for some weird reason
#37
Quote by kilbie
After reading a bit of this thread (i'd usually read everything but there's a lot to read, I might read it tomorrow), the first thing I thought is why are you paying to upgrade all of the bands gear? You should really just be paying to upgrade your own.

Yeah, but remember that it's a band. Nobody cares if just one member sounds good and others bad. All members need to sound good. Of course the other guys should buy their own gear but if they don't have money, what can you do? I'd rather buy my bandmates guitar amps and have a good tone than force them to play through their too quiet practice amps that sound bad. They could pay you back when they had the money.

It seems a lot of stuff about expensive vs cheap gear has already been said, all I can think to add is that good gear can sound bad if you don't EQ it right, and if you mess around with cheap gear a lot you can probably get it to sound okay (depending on the sound you want).

This is true. If you can't make a cheap amp sound at least decent, it's your own fault, not the amp's. I mean, most amps can sound okay if you just can use them right. Of course there's a problem if you run out of power and you can't be heard. But you will sound decent through almost any pretty cheap amp, as long as you'll be heard. And also, good amps aren't that expensive. Just buy used and you'll find one that really sounds good and you don't have to pay that much.

I would say that the audience wouldn't consider a sound coming from a Line 6 Spider (if tweaked right) that bad. I'm sure most people in the audience don't even listen to the guitar sound (and again, cheap amps don't sound THAT awful), they listen to the songs and the overall sound. You just need to have a good mix.

And I'm not saying everybody should go and gig with their crappy practice amps. But even with cheap stuff you can get passable tones and the audience won't find it painful to listen to. They don't care about your guitar tone that much, they care about the songs. Of course I would rather play through a good amp but if you just don't have the money to buy good amps, you can get passable tones with not that great amps.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Aug 11, 2013,
#38
Upgrade as you need it. That's how I see it.

Are you guys playing through PA's or are you just cranking up the amps and going at it? Having a competent sound engineer makes a world of difference, having properly tuned drums makes world of difference. Proper EQ, making room for each other sonically...makes a world of difference.

Also if you do decide to get gear, go the used route. I have yet to buy anything new since starting to play more professionally, spending $1000 on a marshall head instead of $2000, leaves you that extra grand to use for something else. You can honestly set most of your band up with "new" gear for the price you could pay for one head and a cabinet if you bought it new.
#39
Quote by Metalisnotmusic
In fact, I could tell you were using an RP from the first note, they sound bad.


I just got an RP1000. I'm quite happy with it, as is the rest of the band. It makes up the core of my sound, as I use the modelling in it and go into the clean channel of my solid-state amp.

We are a gigging band. We have 7 shows (three sets, the only band on each night) from July 27 to Sept 1. We routinely get re-booked in the places we play.

Speaking directly to the question, the songs, the quality of the live mix of the band and the quality of the band itself will be much more important than the quality of the gear. The quality of the gear makes a bigger difference recording than live, IMHO. I've been in bands since 1987 and have always used solid state amps. Nobody has ever complained. In fact, I've had a lot of people say things like, "that's solid state? I could have sworn it was tubes." If you take your time setting things up and it sounds good, people equate "it sounds good" with "it sounds like tubes."

I'd even step out on a limb and suggest that more people are using modelling live than you would think. It's just that when they get up on stage and there is no "amp clutter" on the stage, the listener has no idea what they are using, and therefore, as long as it sounds good, have no basis on which to criticize their use of them.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Last edited by axemanchris at Aug 17, 2013,
#40
Quote by axemanchris
I just got an RP1000. I'm quite happy with it, as is the rest of the band. It makes up the core of my sound, as I use the modelling in it and go into the clean channel of my solid-state amp.

We are a gigging band. We have 7 shows (three sets, the only band on each night) from July 27 to Sept 1. We routinely get re-booked in the places we play.

Speaking directly to the question, the songs, the quality of the live mix of the band and the quality of the band itself will be much more important than the quality of the gear. The quality of the gear makes a bigger difference recording than live, IMHO. I've been in bands since 1987 and have always used solid state amps. Nobody has ever complained. In fact, I've had a lot of people say things like, "that's solid state? I could have sworn it was tubes." If you take your time setting things up and it sounds good, people equate "it sounds good" with "it sounds like tubes."

I'd even step out on a limb and suggest that more people are using modelling live than you would think. It's just that when they get up on stage and there is no "amp clutter" on the stage, the listener has no idea what they are using, and therefore, as long as it sounds good, have no basis on which to criticize their use of them.

CT

I agree. As I said, no amp really sounds THAT bad (OK, some cheap practice amps do but you wouldn't gig with one). You just need to know how to use your gear.

And a Digitech RP... Well, IMO it sounds decent. Nothing special but I am pretty happy with some of the tones I get with it. It doesn't sound terrible and you could easily gig with one. Not the best sound but if you don't have anything else or don't want to carry your amp with you, it would work.

When you play live, the audience doesn't even hear the guitar tone that clearly. The tone doesn't need to be the best, it just needs to cut through and not hurt your ears. And most amps' tones don't hurt your ears, at least if you can use them. Yes, some may have an annoying fizzy sound or not have the dynamics of a tube amp or sound "digital" or something. But I'm sure the audience wouldn't care. As long as the mix is good and your tone isn't terrible and you play well, they are going to like you.

So I think you guys are exaggerating.

Yes, gear does make a difference in sound but remember that we are talking about live sound. When you play live, it's usually pretty loud so people aren't going to hear how a guitar alone sounds like. It just needs to sit in the mix well and it sounds good (and IMO in all big gigs I have seen, the mix has been pretty bad - too much bass frequencies and you can't even hear the guitar - the sound isn't clear at all).
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Aug 17, 2013,