General Scientific Inquiry/Discussion, and Importance of Science Literacy

Page 1 of 8
#1
After some searching to no avail I decided that there should be a thread catering to the scientifically literate and those seeking scientific literacy.

The function of this thread is to reduce clutter and to provide scientific information and the civil discussion of this information.
Topics including:
Mathematics
Physics
Biology
Medicine
Astronomy
Neurology
Geology
Zoology
Engineering
Chemistry
Anthropology
Sociology
Ect.

Any subject with scientific merit is welcome to the discussion, but remember this is not so much a philosophy thread, so please keep the speculation as close to the realm of science as possible. The topics of discussion must be subject to the scientific method; however, there's no specific course for the discussion, if you have a question or article about anything that meets the requirements for the thread feel free to post and join the conversation at any time.


I'd like to lead with the news of reaching sub-absolute zero temperatures.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130104143516.htm
Last edited by HypernovaGlow at Aug 7, 2013,
#2
The notion that The Pit is capable of having intelligent, critical discussions on intelligent, complex subjects is silly.
THE FORUM UPDATE KILLED THE GRADIENT STAR

Baltimore Orioles: 2014 AL Eastern Division Champions, 2017: 73-78
Baltimore Ravens: 2012 World Champions, 2017: 2-0
2017 NFL Pick 'Em: 24-7
#3
Good idea, but unless there's some controversy here I would be surprised if you get much discussion.

Global Warming?

Race and Intelligence a la "The Bell Curve"?

Gay male blood donors?

Validity of the Drake Equation?


Quote by necrosis1193
The notion that The Pit is capable of having intelligent, critical discussions on intelligent, complex subjects is silly.


Ok, that's your hypothesis. How are you going to scientifically prove it?
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
Last edited by Arby911 at Aug 7, 2013,
#4
Quote by Arby911
Ok, that's your hypothesis. How are you going to scientifically prove it?


Common knowledge does not require citation.
THE FORUM UPDATE KILLED THE GRADIENT STAR

Baltimore Orioles: 2014 AL Eastern Division Champions, 2017: 73-78
Baltimore Ravens: 2012 World Champions, 2017: 2-0
2017 NFL Pick 'Em: 24-7
#6
what's a science and how much does it cost? I want one

EDIT: unless it goes against my conservative christian beliefs. In which case down with the science!
#7
Quote by necrosis1193
Common knowledge does not require citation.


“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#8
Can we talk about the possibility of man harnessing nuclear fusion? Last time I really knew anything about what was going on we'd reproduced the conditions needed, but only for very short times, I think at the reactor in South Korea.

Anyone know what's happened since?
#10
I'm more well versed in the area of quantum computing (The physics side of it) So I can try and explain anything about that

yes^
#11
Quote by MadClownDisease
I was just wondering, will there ever be a boy born who can swim faster than a shark?


Looking to buy a Fender Jagstang, u sellin?
#12
Quote by Ssargentslayer
I'm more well versed in the area of quantum computing (The physics side of it) So I can try and explain anything about that

yes^


Professor Albert Keenstein, reporting for duty.
#13
I'm currently pretty interested in contemplative neurology, psychology, and neuropsychology, although I lack the requisite knowledge (chemistry, biology) to fully understand the neurological workings.

It's pretty interesting with regards to the induction of so called "transcendental states" like those found under the influence of psychotropics. The myriad psychological benefits make it interesting as well, with the ability to almost eliminate visible startle response [1] , promote empathic compassion [2] , mitigate depression in people with Major Depressive Disorder with more than two relapses at a greater efficiency than either pharmaceutical or conventional therapeutic interventions [3] , and improve elements of executive function [4], and improve flow states when listening to music [5] .
Last edited by TooktheAtrain at Aug 7, 2013,
#14
Quote by Arby911

Validity of the Drake Equation?




Hah, while interesting, surely no one views that as valid?
My God, it's full of stars!
#15
Quote by TooktheAtrain
I'm currently pretty interested in contemplative neurology, psychology, and neuropsychology, although I lack the requisite knowledge (chemistry, biology) to fully understand the neurological workings.

It's pretty interesting with regards to the induction of so called "transcendental states" like those found under the influence of psychotropics. The myriad psychological benefits make it interesting as well, with the ability to almost eliminate visible startle response [1] , promote empathic compassion [2] , mitigate depression in people with Major Depressive Disorder with more than two relapses at a greater efficiency than either pharmaceutical or conventional therapeutic interventions [3] , and improve elements of executive function [4], and improve flow states when listening to music [5] .

Too bad most of society views psychedelics in bad way :/

Quote by Morphogenesis26
Professor Albert Keenstein, reporting for duty.

#16
Quote by Ssargentslayer
Too bad most of society views psychedelics in bad way :/


http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130407090832.htm

Yep, it's too bad. We could be making progress in the field of medicine if it weren't for ignorance.

To the majority of other posters in this thread: I'm new to the community and this seemed the appropriate section for such discussion. I don't think that following the forum rules should hinder the threads ability to be useful. I've started this thread on other forums that seemed completely void of maturity and intelligence and the threads have thrived due to people having a legitimate interest in science.

I understand how having fun on a forum works, and it's not my job to moderate. That being said, you cats are welcome to derail as much as you'd like but in the same fashion I'm going to continue updating this thread with current scientific news and discussion with other members who wish to learn and contribute to an important subject.

Thanks, yo.
#17
Christ, we might actually have a worthwhile 13'er on our hands. You're literally the only one all year.
#18
Quote by willT08
Christ, we might actually have a worthwhile 13'er on our hands. You're literally the only one all year.


It only took over half the year to do.
#19
As a brief introduction, I don't really know much (about anything), but I am pursuing a BS in Space Studies via an online university, since it is the only current educational opportunity available to me. To my defense, it's a fully accredited and very highly rated/accepted online university.

A space studies degree is a combination of the "hard sciences" of astronomy, cosmology, and astrophysics (to a very small degree), and the different fields of space transportation, agencies, politics, etc. To be honest I'm generally more interested in the hard science aspect, though not I think strong enough to want to pursue a degree in either astronomy or astrophysics, although the PhD program in Astronomy at UW Seattle is pretty tempting as a possibility. In addition to the astronomy aspect of space studies, I like thinking about the future tactical benefits of space maneuvering, how current small unit tactics can be transposed to work in that environment, and things of that nature.

So yeah I like space stuff Everything else, not so much
My God, it's full of stars!
#20
Ender? Is that you?
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#21
Quote by Jackal58
Ender? Is that you?


Nice....
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#23
Quote by Eastwinn
mathematics is not a science.


You and Popper are both full of shit....
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#24
Quote by Dreadnought
As a brief introduction, I don't really know much (about anything), but I am pursuing a BS in Space Studies via an online university, since it is the only current educational opportunity available to me. To my defense, it's a fully accredited and very highly rated/accepted online university.

A space studies degree is a combination of the "hard sciences" of astronomy, cosmology, and astrophysics (to a very small degree), and the different fields of space transportation, agencies, politics, etc. To be honest I'm generally more interested in the hard science aspect, though not I think strong enough to want to pursue a degree in either astronomy or astrophysics, although the PhD program in Astronomy at UW Seattle is pretty tempting as a possibility. In addition to the astronomy aspect of space studies, I like thinking about the future tactical benefits of space maneuvering, how current small unit tactics can be transposed to work in that environment, and things of that nature.

So yeah I like space stuff Everything else, not so much

You can do a PhD after an online BS?
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
#25
Quote by Neo Evil11
You can do a PhD after an online BS?



Assuming the undergraduate degree was fully accredited, why not?
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#26
Quote by Arby911
Assuming the undergraduate degree was fully accredited, why not?

Here you need an MSc before you can get into the PhD. I don't see how an online course learns you how to do actual research either in the field of space studies.
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
#27
the drug thread pretty much has medicine, neurology and chemistry covered
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#28
Quote by Dreadnought
As a brief introduction, I don't really know much (about anything), but I am pursuing a BS in Space Studies via an online university, since it is the only current educational opportunity available to me. To my defense, it's a fully accredited and very highly rated/accepted online university.

A space studies degree is a combination of the "hard sciences" of astronomy, cosmology, and astrophysics (to a very small degree), and the different fields of space transportation, agencies, politics, etc. To be honest I'm generally more interested in the hard science aspect, though not I think strong enough to want to pursue a degree in either astronomy or astrophysics, although the PhD program in Astronomy at UW Seattle is pretty tempting as a possibility. In addition to the astronomy aspect of space studies, I like thinking about the future tactical benefits of space maneuvering, how current small unit tactics can be transposed to work in that environment, and things of that nature.

So yeah I like space stuff Everything else, not so much

I love science all the way from quantum mechanics to astronomy. Sometimes, though, I go to the Hubble website to be humbled by the beauty and intricacy of space... Planets, stars, nebulae, it's all so incredible. The way the forces shape the contents of our universe is one of the most beautiful things I know of.

Here's the site for reference:
http://hubblesite.org/gallery/album/

Edit:
@Burgery
I assumed so when the topic of psychedelics was brought up on the first page; however, I think that this thread can reduce clutter for the drug thread without taking away from it. I think they can co-exist and potentially gain mutual followings as it is from my experience that open-mindedness and a quality of curiosity exists commonly between "scientists" and "users" -- both are experimental by nature and i, for one, will be in the lump of those that use both threads for the purpose of entertainment and civil conversation.
Not to say the the correlation implies causality, just a theory.
Last edited by HypernovaGlow at Aug 7, 2013,
#29
Quote by Arby911
You and Popper are both full of shit....


excellent response
#30
Quote by Neo Evil11
Here you need an MSc before you can get into the PhD. I don't see how an online course learns you how to do actual research either in the field of space studies.

I think you have made an assumption.
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
You should be careful what you say. Some asshole will probably sig it.

Quote by Axelfox
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I can fap to this. Keep going.
#31
Quote by Jackal58
I think you have made an assumption.

I think you have made the assumption that he has made an assumption.
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#32
Quote by Jackal58
I think you have made an assumption.

I am quite sure his degree did not let him use University material to do experiments with or study the universe with decent telescopes.

Or are you talking about the need of the MSc for a PhD? Because that's true, currently in a PhD programme myself. BScs are useless in the Netherlands (Europe).
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
#33
Quote by Neo Evil11
I am quite sure his degree did not let him use University material to do experiments with or study the universe with decent telescopes.

Or are you talking about the need of the MSc for a PhD? Because that's true, currently in a PhD programme myself. BScs are useless in the Netherlands (Europe).

He is in an online BS program atm and stated that UW Seattle has a nice PhD program.
Nowhere did he say he was going to complete the BS and then get his PhD. Or that there were no other requirements to get into a PhD program. He merely commented on a separate program. You made the leap.
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
You should be careful what you say. Some asshole will probably sig it.

Quote by Axelfox
Yup, a girl went up to me in my fursuit one time.

Quote by Xiaoxi
I can fap to this. Keep going.
#34
Quote by Jackal58
He is in an online BS program atm and stated that UW Seattle has a nice PhD program.
Nowhere did he say he was going to complete the BS and then get his PhD. Or that there were no other requirements to get into a PhD program. He merely commented on a separate program. You made the leap.

Yes, I did. He said it was tempting, I squashed his illusions.
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
#35
Quote by Neo Evil11
Yes, I did. He said it was tempting, I squashed his illusions.

What illusions?
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
You should be careful what you say. Some asshole will probably sig it.

Quote by Axelfox
Yup, a girl went up to me in my fursuit one time.

Quote by Xiaoxi
I can fap to this. Keep going.
#36
I don't really know anything about school, but either way I'd like to say that it's worth your while to take any schooling that you can. I wish I had. Education is important because it gives you a greater scope of credibility. If you're Dr. Joe Shmo your opinion will, potentially, be considered valid or more valid by a wider range of people(skeptics or not).
This enables you to educate, and if you go out of your way to do so, and to spread truth based on reason... You could help change the world.

I'm just some dude who takes the liberty of self-educating. If I explain to someone how evolution works, "well what the **** does that guy know?" Is what they're going to say if they don't have an inclination to believe me.

Sorry, I'm a ramblin' man.
Besides all of that, Dread, I applaud you for taking the liberty to go to school, in any way you can, to gain a credible knowledge of science. Thanks for being part of the solution, homie.
#37
Currently pursuing a bachelor's degree in astrophysics, aspiring to be a physicist. I'm a bit concerned about getting a tenured professorship position in the future though, so I might end up pursuing a more stable career that's still just as physics intense (medical physics).

Anyways, I saw something about Drake's Equation. I don't know about it's accuracy or validity since it seems like a lot of it is arbitrary, but given the vast number of star systems out there, I'm sure there is at least one other system out there that has life on it other than our own. I guess the question is how many though.
#38
Quote by Neo Evil11
Here you need an MSc before you can get into the PhD. I don't see how an online course learns you how to do actual research either in the field of space studies.


I can't speak to his particular situation, but I know that in the US a Masters Degree is not always prerequisite to pursuing a Doctorate.

Quote by HypernovaGlow
I don't really know anything about school, but either way I'd like to say that it's worth your while to take any schooling that you can. I wish I had. Education is important because it gives you a greater scope of credibility. If you're Dr. Joe Shmo your opinion will, potentially, be considered valid or more valid by a wider range of people(skeptics or not).
This enables you to educate, and if you go out of your way to do so, and to spread truth based on reason... You could help change the world.

I'm just some dude who takes the liberty of self-educating. If I explain to someone how evolution works, "well what the **** does that guy know?" Is what they're going to say if they don't have an inclination to believe me.

Sorry, I'm a ramblin' man.
Besides all of that, Dread, I applaud you for taking the liberty to go to school, in any way you can, to gain a credible knowledge of science. Thanks for being part of the solution, homie.


Well said! The only two things that are absolutely essential for a quality education are an intense desire to learn and a good library, and the library is optional...
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
Last edited by Arby911 at Aug 7, 2013,
#39
Quote by Neo Evil11
Here you need an MSc before you can get into the PhD. I don't see how an online course learns you how to do actual research either in the field of space studies.

If it's an accredited Undergraduate degree from a respected institution then he would indeed be able to qualify for a PhD program.

Over here many PhD programmes only require an undergrad degree. In practice some are only open to people with Masters degrees, but that's simply due to competition. If you are an outstanding undergraduate student in a field where there isn't huge competition for PhD places (which is sometimes the case in science fields where many people go into industry rather than academia) then it would be possible.
"Why should we subsidise intellectual curiosity?"
-Ronald Reagan

"Knowledge is in every country the surest basis of public happiness."
-George Washington
#40
Quote by zincabopataurio
Currently pursuing a bachelor's degree in astrophysics, aspiring to be a physicist. I'm a bit concerned about getting a tenured professorship position in the future though, so I might end up pursuing a more stable career that's still just as physics intense (medical physics).

Anyways, I saw something about Drake's Equation. I don't know about it's accuracy or validity since it seems like a lot of it is arbitrary, but given the vast number of star systems out there, I'm sure there is at least one other system out there that has life on it other than our own. I guess the question is how many though.

This is just the copy+paste taken from another forum of my final thoughts about the subject of life in the universe:
Mathematically it's bordering on the edge if impossible for us to be the only life in the universe, and one would be a foolish ego-maniac to assume that we're alone.

The further we explore the more we find that life can exist under a wider range of circumstance than we originally thought. Not only can life be found on Earth with the ability to thrive through the extremes of radiation and temperature, we've found that planetary, and moon bodies have been found to gain energy in other ways than their star -- Planets or moons being acted on by the gravity of other planets and their star in a specific balance can cause the planet or moon to act in the fashion of bouncing a basketball; thus, heating itself with kinetic energy from gravity.

All that aside, intelligence is not required for life. I would assume that that would be far more rare, but also completely plausible. I believe that in the expanse of the universe exists life at an amazing spectrum from the very basic single celled life to the human equivalent and beyond... Neil DeGrasse Tyson speculates that a DNA based life-form with a genetic difference of less than 5% of that in humans could be so far beyond us that we would be the equivalent of "primates" to them -- in the same way that the great apes are to humans in the opposite direction genetically. Everything that exists in the genome that could create the dramatic difference between us and a chimpanzee occurs in less than 5% of that code. Actually I think it's more like 2% or less.

Anyway, the universe is abundant with carbon and carbon is the most chemically active element on the periodic table. If you needed a good building block for life it would be carbon and the universe has a lot of it.
"Dude, am I really thinking or am I, just like, thinking that I'm thinking?" -Bill Nye

CHIMPS>WOLVES

Quote by progdude93
I don't believe the Big Bang