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#1
I am 17 and I have been having guitar lessons since I was 14. When I first started I wasn't very good, after a year of lessons I was more confident but still shaky, after 2yrs I was getting average, after 3yrs I'd say I am ever so slightly above average, however, I don't feel like I am learning anything from my guitar teacher anymore. I am VERY good at rhythm guitar but my lead is lacking - but I don't like lead as much, anyway. And I plan to play rhythm guitar if I ever decide to join a band.

I have a lesson every 2wks for 1hr and recently, all we seem to be doing is looking at a book of solo tabs. I could easily teach myself these at home - the only thing I struggle with is techniques, which with practice would be fine. We started doing these solos because I told my teacher my lead is not very good. I could learn these solos myself if I had the book.

I posted a video of me covering the Black Keys on here a while back and most of you said I should be better at lead after 4yrs of lessons - which I admit I should. I don't know whether I should stop going to my guitar teacher, though. I get on with him and I don't know how I'd say I'm not going to be going anymore. I may just wait until I go to uni next autumn (2014) but at £25p/h it's getting expensive.

What do you think? Should I drop my guitar teacher? How can I? What excuse would I use? I pay as I go, so I have no prepaid lessons.
Last edited by TGG_ at Aug 7, 2013,
#2
I say you should continue. You're hitting the phase where you aren't going to improve by leaps and bounds. Improving any technique can have benefits elsewhere. You said you're going at rhythm guitar but struggle with timing. That's almost contradictory. If you have someone who can focus your practice and keep you on the right track, do it. If you're set on quitting then tell him ahead of time, a few lessons maybe. It's getting expensive and you need your money for school.

I do recommend sticking with them. If he's drilling stuff you struggle with then it will help. Not everyone is good at really focusing on weak points. I'm one of those people. I've been playing like 8 years now and I'm pretty mediocre.
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#3
Quote by BladeSlinger
I say you should continue. You're hitting the phase where you aren't going to improve by leaps and bounds. Improving any technique can have benefits elsewhere. You said you're going at rhythm guitar but struggle with timing. That's almost contradictory. If you have someone who can focus your practice and keep you on the right track, do it. If you're set on quitting then tell him ahead of time, a few lessons maybe. It's getting expensive and you need your money for school.

I do recommend sticking with them. If he's drilling stuff you struggle with then it will help. Not everyone is good at really focusing on weak points. I'm one of those people. I've been playing like 8 years now and I'm pretty mediocre.


I have to agree on that rhythm bit. What do you classify as "rhythm", TS?

Now, if you can tell him you're struggling with a certain area and he can help you improve, then I don't see any reason, other than financial issues, to stop lessons.
#4
Sounds like you have a plethora of reasons to stop. It's not like you can never start up again, maybe just try taking a break from formal lessons and see what you can do on your own.

Quote by emad
jthm_guitarist
Warned for trolling!


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Didn't you say that you had a stuffed fox that you would occasionally fuck?

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It's not a fox,it's a wolf.
#6
Techniques is a huge area.
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#8
Quote by BladeSlinger
Techniques is a huge area.


Well I have nailed hammer-ons, palm mute and harmonics - but the others I have not been taught or cannot do. Pull-offs I am okay with to a point
#9
Quote by TGG_
Well I have nailed hammer-ons, palm mute and harmonics - but the others I have not been taught or cannot do. Pull-offs I am okay with to a point

I mean, don't refer to those only as "techniques". Just name them or a general area. Alternate picking is a technique, legato is a technique, vibrato is a technique. Saying you struggle with techniques is kind of pointless because it could be anything.


Like jthm_guitarist said, you can always start back. It sounds like you would benefit from sticking with it but it's your call. You might focus on areas you want and develop those skills before you start back. And if you've had lessons the whole time, it might be good to experience not having a teacher there to focus your efforts. I'm taking Jazz guitar this semester and I'm so excited. My practices are never focused because I'm bad at keeping myself on one goal. A teacher lets me focus because that give me structure. You might work better on your own or you might find you need that structure.
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#11
I think I gave you advice when you posted that Black Keys, if you're the guy I'm thinking of. It's not changed, I think your guitar teacher isn't up to scratch, and I say that as a guitar teacher myself, so I think you should continue lessons, but with another teacher. A proper teacher will teach you proper form, help your technique, and provide you with fundamentals required to learn solos rather than just put a book of solos in front of you and teach them to you note by note, which, as you can say, you can do at home. I'd just say to your guitar teacher that he's not providing you what you need to learn, and you feel that after four years of playing you're nowhere near the level a guitarist playing for four years should be at. A while ago I changed singing teachers for that very reason, and while it might be rude to say, it'll force any good teacher to reexamine their teaching methods, and it will allow you to improve your skill. Whether you get on with them or not, you're still paying someone, and if you feel they're robbing you blind, then you get out.
#12
Quote by CelestialGuitar
I think I gave you advice when you posted that Black Keys, if you're the guy I'm thinking of. It's not changed, I think your guitar teacher isn't up to scratch, and I say that as a guitar teacher myself, so I think you should continue lessons, but with another teacher. A proper teacher will teach you proper form, help your technique, and provide you with fundamentals required to learn solos rather than just put a book of solos in front of you and teach them to you note by note, which, as you can say, you can do at home. I'd just say to your guitar teacher that he's not providing you what you need to learn, and you feel that after four years of playing you're nowhere near the level a guitarist playing for four years should be at. A while ago I changed singing teachers for that very reason, and while it might be rude to say, it'll force any good teacher to reexamine their teaching methods, and it will allow you to improve your skill. Whether you get on with them or not, you're still paying someone, and if you feel they're robbing you blind, then you get out.


Yeah, I am the same guy! I can't be rude - I get along with him and he's nice enough. I am going to figure out what to do other the next few days. My excuse will be I can't afford it because of uni, etc.

Btw, could you take a listen to the track I posted and see what you think? Does it sound like someone who has been playing for 4yrs?
#13
I have to be honest, if that recording was given to me by someone and I was asked how long I thought that guitarist had been playing, the number of years would be quite a bit less than four, and I would have guessed that you were a self-taught guitarist. You don't quite have the confidence in your playing that a guitarist with a good instructor would have, your single-note playing is quite sloppy, your rhythm is quite uneven, and you often let strings or harmonics ring out, and they need to be muted. An instructor should be critiquing your playing, ironing out problems, making sure your form is correct. It's fine if you don't want to be brutal with your teacher, but I would say find another teacher. What part of the UK do you live in, by the way? As a guitar teacher in the UK, I know of quite a few good teachers who I might recommend, depending on the area, if you don't mind me asking, of course.
#14
Just listened to the recording. If that's what years of an instructor did, get a new teacher. Or try teaching yourself.
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#15
I wouldn't pay someone to teach me from tabs. In fact, I'd ask someone to pay me to learn from tabs.

Get a real teacher worth paying for. Your technique lessons should be mostly correcting mistakes, not learning stuff.
#16
Quote by cdgraves
I wouldn't pay someone to teach me from tabs. In fact, I'd ask someone to pay me to learn from tabs.

Get a real teacher worth paying for. Your technique lessons should be mostly correcting mistakes, not learning stuff.


What should a guitar teacher be doing then? Ever since I have been going I have been learning from http://www.rockschool.co.uk/qualifications/gradedmusicexams/guitar/gradefive.aspx. You can view some of the tabs, and they aren't too challenging. He has taught me scales and improvisation. That's all. I did start to learn theory, however, I didn't find it compelling.
Last edited by TGG_ at Aug 8, 2013,
#18
Quote by TGG_
What should a guitar teacher be doing then? Ever since I have been going I have been learning from http://www.rockschool.co.uk/qualifications/gradedmusicexams/guitar/gradefive.aspx. You can view some of the tabs, and they aren't too challenging. He has taught me scales and improvisation. That's all. I did start to learn theory, however, I didn't find it compelling.


A guitar teacher should be teaching you proper form, techniques, he should be helping your timing, your general knowledge of music, opening you up to new music, he should also be making sure you progress, setting homework, making sure that you're going beyond what you want to do. I understand you're into Indie/Britpop sort of stuff, but I would teach you technique to the same level I'd teach a Neoclassical player, for example, as every player needs to be challenged. You're paying £25 an hour to, frankly, be fed, you're being taught tabs and being told you're good, but, if I'm honest, you're not good, there are fundamental flaws in your technique that must be rectified, and I don't mean to sound rude, but it's an utter tragedy that you and perhaps other students are being robbed blind.

You need to learn proper form as I mentioned before, different chord voicings, you need to work to metronomes, for your style, I'd recommend learning Jazz, as that would make you a great lead and rhythm guitarist, and you really should be doing both. You should definitely not be at Rockschool Grade 5 after 4 years of instruction, you should be more Grade 8, quite frankly, and leaving Rockschool behind. I really apologise for being rude, but I am utterly aghast that a teacher would do this. When I teach students, I am prepared for them to go out into the public and say 'I was taught by Daniel Carpenter', and when they say that, I want people to go 'Bloody hell, I need lessons off that guy!', not '0_o How is he getting paid?', as teaching is a profession that lives and dies on reputation, and every teacher I know lives by this rule. It's a shame that one doesn't seem to be and he's getting away with it.
#19
How often do you practice? -Not just noodling around or playing for fun but focused deliberate practice to improve something specific. How long are the regular practice sessions and how often per week? Be honest.
Si
#20
Quote by CelestialGuitar
A guitar teacher should be teaching you proper form, techniques, he should be helping your timing, your general knowledge of music, opening you up to new music, he should also be making sure you progress, setting homework, making sure that you're going beyond what you want to do. I understand you're into Indie/Britpop sort of stuff, but I would teach you technique to the same level I'd teach a Neoclassical player, for example, as every player needs to be challenged. You're paying £25 an hour to, frankly, be fed, you're being taught tabs and being told you're good, but, if I'm honest, you're not good, there are fundamental flaws in your technique that must be rectified, and I don't mean to sound rude, but it's an utter tragedy that you and perhaps other students are being robbed blind.

You need to learn proper form as I mentioned before, different chord voicings, you need to work to metronomes, for your style, I'd recommend learning Jazz, as that would make you a great lead and rhythm guitarist, and you really should be doing both. You should definitely not be at Rockschool Grade 5 after 4 years of instruction, you should be more Grade 8, quite frankly, and leaving Rockschool behind. I really apologise for being rude, but I am utterly aghast that a teacher would do this. When I teach students, I am prepared for them to go out into the public and say 'I was taught by Daniel Carpenter', and when they say that, I want people to go 'Bloody hell, I need lessons off that guy!', not '0_o How is he getting paid?', as teaching is a profession that lives and dies on reputation, and every teacher I know lives by this rule. It's a shame that one doesn't seem to be and he's getting away with it.


Thanks for being honest I know I am not good and that's what is frustrating me. I have been paying £25 every two weeks for the past four years to hardly progress. I feel I am playing at the same level I was two years ago - not good.

I need to save money for university, I think I am just going to stop guitar lessons. I mean, I never intended to play guitar as a living. It was only ever a hobby, and I feel self-teaching would be good enough considering I am not serious about being a musician.

We do not do Rock School religiously each week, I'd say once a month, but Grade 5 is still a bit of a joke. As I PM'd you, he plays his guitar louder than mine...drowning mine out. I have been watching him closely more recently. The thing is, he's a patient guy and has good reviews on his site (well, they are just testimonials he could've written himself) - so maybe it's just I am not practicing enough. However, I play my guitar at least 2-3hrs a day - and 30mins during exam time, so I should be improving. Maybe a lack of focus? I tend to learn tabs or scales.

If there's any questions you can ask me about how to identify if it is my teacher I'll answer them...
#21
Quote by 20Tigers
How often do you practice? -Not just noodling around or playing for fun but focused deliberate practice to improve something specific. How long are the regular practice sessions and how often per week? Be as honest with yourself as possible.


2-3hrs a day. I spend about 1.5hr learning tabs and scales and the rest going over what I've learnt.
#22
When you say learning tabs and scales, how in depth are you going? Are you getting them down cleanly or just enough to play? Going off the first recording, it sounds like you're very unsure of yourself or you don't have everything down. Memorizing a scale isn't much good if you're playing it from memory every day at the same tempo and never learn how it's applied. Being really clean and applying a few scales well is much better than knowing a lot of them.
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#23
Quote by BladeSlinger
When you say learning tabs and scales, how in depth are you going? Are you getting them down cleanly or just enough to play? Going off the first recording, it sounds like you're very unsure of yourself or you don't have everything down. Memorizing a scale isn't much good if you're playing it from memory every day at the same tempo and never learn how it's applied. Being really clean and applying a few scales well is much better than knowing a lot of them.


Well take a look at my second recording: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rFcByJyRpP0 - any better?

I learn it and play it each day to remain familiar with it.

When I write a piece I don't use scales. I just put my fingers in random places (poor approach at songwriting, I know) and play. Sometimes it sounds okay, sometimes it doesn't.
#24
Sadly, I'm at work and can't listen to it right now.
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#25
Quote by BladeSlinger
Sadly, I'm at work and can't listen to it right now.


Oh, ok - when you get the chance
#27
2-3hrs per day is a decent amount of practice. If it is everyday for the past four years, you should be much better than what your posts show.

if it is 2-3 hours per day two days a week but you take the odd month break here and there I would expect the progress you have made to be about right. 20 minutes every day 7 days a week is better than 3 hours every Saturday.

Do you ever find yourself spending ten minutes playing the same four second riff over and over and over because one of the notes just isn't ringing out clearly? And then the next ten minutes playing that same four second riff but this time with the four seconds before and the four seconds after?

Do you count a lot? Do you spend a lot of time counting to a metronome and muting all the strings with your left hand just practice your right hand rhythm focusing on hitting only the right strings at the right time?

Does your teacher precisely identify any weaknesses in your playing then give you specific exercises to address those issues?

Has he ever asked you about your goals for the guitar and then in light of your goals discussed with you what you should focus on in your practice sessions and set your lesson plans accordingly?

Does he tell you what skills you will be learning or improving with each new exercise/song?

Or does your teacher just give you new songs, from tab, each session and then gets you to play along with him while his amp is cranked louder than yours so that neither of you can even hear your mistakes?
Si
#28
Quote by 20Tigers
2-3hrs per day is a decent amount of practice. If it is everyday for the past four years, you should be much better than what your posts show.

if it is 2-3 hours per day two days a week but you take the odd month break here and there I would expect the progress you have made to be about right. 20 minutes every day 7 days a week is better than 3 hours every Saturday. I take a break between Feb-May each year due to exams. I do 3hrs at the weekends (3hrs in holidays) and about 30mins-1hr weekdays.

Do you ever find yourself spending ten minutes playing the same four second riff over and over and over because one of the notes just isn't ringing out clearly? And then the next ten minutes playing that same four second riff but this time with the four seconds before and the four seconds after?

Do you count a lot? Do you spend a lot of time counting to a metronome and muting all the strings with your left hand just practice your right hand rhythm focusing on hitting only the right strings at the right time? I have no metronome.

Does your teacher precisely identify any weaknesses in your playing then give you specific exercises to address those issues? He has once. I got into a habit of not using my little finger. He suggested going up and down the fret board playing 1-2-3-4 down and up the strings.

Has he ever asked you about your goals for the guitar and then in light of your goals discussed with you what you should focus on in your practice sessions and set your practice sessions accordingly? He hasn't asked me before. I told him a month or so (after posting a video of a black Keys cover on here which received a negative response) that I wanted to get better at lead. He told me to learn solos and taught me solo tabs.

Does he tell you what skills you will be learning or improving with each new exercise/song? No. When we reach a new technique he helps me for about 10mins and tells me to go home and practice it.

Or does your teacher just give you new songs, from tab, each session and then gets you to play along with him while his amp is cranked louder than yours so that neither of you can even hear your mistakes? This sounds more like him.


Answers above.

I must point out, however. I post my tracks on my favourite band's forum and many people have given positive feedback. I thought at first that they maybe are just being nice, but I have seen threads where they have ripped on some guy's creation. So that doesn't seem to be the case. Do you think it may be the style of music that is making people have a negative view of the track?
#29
Dude, get a new teacher. That sounds awful.
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#30
Quote by BladeSlinger
Dude, get a new teacher. That sounds awful.


The track or the info I gave on him? :p
#32
Quote by TGG_
Well take a look at my second recording: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rFcByJyRpP0 - any better?

I learn it and play it each day to remain familiar with it.

When I write a piece I don't use scales. I just put my fingers in random places (poor approach at songwriting, I know) and play. Sometimes it sounds okay, sometimes it doesn't.

I liked the intro of the song. But otherwise you would need some kind of melody over the rhythm part. It gets too repetitive.

But yeah, when you write a song, you don't want to just decide "let's write a song" and then put your fingers on the fretboard and hope something good to come out. Sometimes I put my fingers on "random" frets (they aren't completely random but I don't know exactly how the chord will sound like) and find some cool sounds but that's not how I write my songs. You want to know how to make the sounds you want to make. Songwriting isn't playing random notes. Music isn't about fingerings, it's about sound and you want to know the sound. Of course you need to experiment a bit and find some new voicings, nothing wrong with that. But if you base your whole songwriting on it, that's not really a good thing. So really start training your ear. Good ear is what a good musician needs.

Oh, and people give good comments about your songs because there's something good in the songs. And usually in at least UG forums most of the feedback will be positive.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

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Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Aug 9, 2013,
#33
Quote by TGG_
Answers above.

I must point out, however. I post my tracks on my favourite band's forum and many people have given positive feedback. I thought at first that they maybe are just being nice, but I have seen threads where they have ripped on some guy's creation. So that doesn't seem to be the case. Do you think it may be the style of music that is making people have a negative view of the track?

Then definitely find a new teacher.

If you are talking about the response in this forum when you say "negative view" and comparing it to a more positive reception in another forum the difference is probably in the consideration of the listener and possibly the audience.

If you are in a place discussing your favourite bands then post a song and say "hey look what I came up with" then they will look at the song and probably forgive minor errors in technique. However if you post in a musician's talk forum where there are a few professional teachers and gigging musicians and pose the question "I've been playing four years but think I'm not progressing as much as I should be with this teacher - here's a clip of me playing..." then the responses will be more discerning and focus on your technique and skill set.

As for the metronome crazysam23_Atax is right. If you are interested in rhythm guitar your teacher should be starting simple and once you master the simple then introducing new songs that introduce new rhythmic patterns, techniques, dynamics etc to your playing. Before that though the first thing he should have done was make sure you have a metronome and taught you to count.

When I listen to your songs you posted the thing that gets me is this kind of jittery feel where it sounds like some notes fall just ahead of the beat, just after, and others right on. It lacks fluidity and in the rhythm. Also there is the odd dead note that was not fretted properly so doesn't ring out or a string was hit by accident. Both of these problems occurred in both of the recordings to which I listened. These types of things should be fairly obvious to your teacher and he should be able to give you exercises to help you correct them.

Post one more song - this time post something that is not improvisation or one of your originals. Post the song that you can play the best and that you learned with your teacher.
Si
#34
The best thing that ever happened to me was hiring a teacher who was BRUTALLY HONEST with me about every aspect of my playing. When I hired him I was already playing gigs, and thought (at 21) that I was hot stuff. I was, in fact, better than average I guess. I mean, an average guitar player is not very good......on average .

The first lesson he had me play my best song and solo. I thought I had done pretty good, but then he proceded to pick it apart from beginning to end. He forced me, for the next two years, to re-examine everything about my playing. Never pulling any punches and never witholding praise when it was earned.

Find one of those. Tabs are fine for getting started in my opinion. But at this point in your education you should be reading real music, learning real music theory that all composers and arrangers should know (and like it or not, that is what you are when you are improvising and transcribing for yourself), training your ear so you can learn to interact with music on a more internal level and getting yourself into as many ensemble playing situations as you can.
#35
Quote by 20Tigers
Then definitely find a new teacher.

If you are talking about the response in this forum when you say "negative view" and comparing it to a more positive reception in another forum the difference is probably in the consideration of the listener and possibly the audience.

If you are in a place discussing your favourite bands then post a song and say "hey look what I came up with" then they will look at the song and probably forgive minor errors in technique. However if you post in a musician's talk forum where there are a few professional teachers and gigging musicians and pose the question "I've been playing four years but think I'm not progressing as much as I should be with this teacher - here's a clip of me playing..." then the responses will be more discerning and focus on your technique and skill set.

As for the metronome crazysam23_Atax is right. If you are interested in rhythm guitar your teacher should be starting simple and once you master the simple then introducing new songs that introduce new rhythmic patterns, techniques, dynamics etc to your playing. Before that though the first thing he should have done was make sure you have a metronome and taught you to count.

When I listen to your songs you posted the thing that gets me is this kind of jittery feel where it sounds like some notes fall just ahead of the beat, just after, and others right on. It lacks fluidity and in the rhythm. Also there is the odd dead note that was not fretted properly so doesn't ring out or a string was hit by accident. Both of these problems occurred in both of the recordings to which I listened. These types of things should be fairly obvious to your teacher and he should be able to give you exercises to help you correct them.

Post one more song - this time post something that is not improvisation or one of your originals. Post the song that you can play the best and that you learned with your teacher.


I am going to self-teach. Not like I am going to be making a career out of music, so self-teaching will be good enough. Plus I'll safe £600 a year.

They do post some negative comments on other threads about technique, etc. but never mine. Maybe it's because they know I am younger and don't want to dampen my enthusiasm?

I think the poor recording may also give the effect of it being worse than it actually is? I'll upload something later with NO effects on. Just a sparkling clean sound.

That's another bad thing. I can't really remember anything I have learnt well with my teacher apart from a couple of RockSchool pieces i never was confident, myself, with. I could post a clean cover of a song I taught myself which involves a few techniques...

I'll also post that Bon Jovi solo I was taught and I knew I ****ed up, yet I was told I did okay and with some practice "it would come on well". Then you can listen and tell me the truth!!
#37
Quote by 20Tigers
Then definitely find a new teacher.

If you are talking about the response in this forum when you say "negative view" and comparing it to a more positive reception in another forum the difference is probably in the consideration of the listener and possibly the audience.

If you are in a place discussing your favourite bands then post a song and say "hey look what I came up with" then they will look at the song and probably forgive minor errors in technique. However if you post in a musician's talk forum where there are a few professional teachers and gigging musicians and pose the question "I've been playing four years but think I'm not progressing as much as I should be with this teacher - here's a clip of me playing..." then the responses will be more discerning and focus on your technique and skill set.

As for the metronome crazysam23_Atax is right. If you are interested in rhythm guitar your teacher should be starting simple and once you master the simple then introducing new songs that introduce new rhythmic patterns, techniques, dynamics etc to your playing. Before that though the first thing he should have done was make sure you have a metronome and taught you to count.

When I listen to your songs you posted the thing that gets me is this kind of jittery feel where it sounds like some notes fall just ahead of the beat, just after, and others right on. It lacks fluidity and in the rhythm. Also there is the odd dead note that was not fretted properly so doesn't ring out or a string was hit by accident. Both of these problems occurred in both of the recordings to which I listened. These types of things should be fairly obvious to your teacher and he should be able to give you exercises to help you correct them.

Post one more song - this time post something that is not improvisation or one of your originals. Post the song that you can play the best and that you learned with your teacher.


This is the last thing I was taught: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HxhPaOMBeBg&feature=youtu.be
#38
Quote by TGG_
I am going to self-teach. Not like I am going to be making a career out of music, so self-teaching will be good enough. Plus I'll safe £600 a year.

They do post some negative comments on other threads about technique, etc. but never mine. Maybe it's because they know I am younger and don't want to dampen my enthusiasm?

I think the poor recording may also give the effect of it being worse than it actually is? I'll upload something later with NO effects on. Just a sparkling clean sound.

That's another bad thing. I can't really remember anything I have learnt well with my teacher apart from a couple of RockSchool pieces i never was confident, myself, with. I could post a clean cover of a song I taught myself which involves a few techniques...

I'll also post that Bon Jovi solo I was taught and I knew I ****ed up, yet I was told I did okay and with some practice "it would come on well". Then you can listen and tell me the truth!!


Self teaching is good. But you have to become very disciplined and learn how to self-crituque without emotional attachment to whaterver it is you just performed or recorded. In other words, you have to become the teacher you should have hired.

Keep in mind that "self-taught" is not a completely accurate way of looking at this process either. Guitar learners go through several phases of competency during their lives.

Fundemental- trying to develop basic hand-eye coordination and basic abilities of forming chord shapes and playing individual notes, also basic rythmic concepts

Transitional- the learner is moving to more difficult pieces and is less restricted by physical challenges and is now trying to conquer more of the mental challenges involved in guitar (such as basic theory, ear training and sight reading) usually stil with the help of a competent teacher

Self-actuating- no longer dependent upon a teacher, the learner is capable of researching more advanced concepts in music and performance and developing strategies to apply these concepts to

You are never really fully out of any of these phases and never fully in any of them. Every new skill or concept you try to conquer puts you right back into the Fundemental phase for that concept, as you learn it and conquer it's phyisical challenges you move to Transitional, and finally when you learn to apply it you have become Self-actuating for that concept. Even Steve Vai or Segovia or whoever would be at the Fundemental level with any new technique or concept they were never before exposed to before. Granted, they may move through these phases at lightening speed compared to me or you.

Ask yourself; where do you think you fall on this continuum? What do you need to do to move to the next? What techniques or theorhetical concepts should you start working on to ensure you are always keeping a part of your studies firmly planted in each level.
#39
Quote by mbself73
Self teaching is good. But you have to become very disciplined and learn how to self-crituque without emotional attachment to whaterver it is you just performed or recorded. In other words, you have to become the teacher you should have hired.

Keep in mind that "self-taught" is not a completely accurate way of looking at this process either. Guitar learners go through several phases of competency during their lives.

Fundemental- trying to develop basic hand-eye coordination and basic abilities of forming chord shapes and playing individual notes, also basic rythmic concepts

Transitional- the learner is moving to more difficult pieces and is less restricted by physical challenges and is now trying to conquer more of the mental challenges involved in guitar (such as basic theory, ear training and sight reading) usually stil with the help of a competent teacher

Self-actuating- no longer dependent upon a teacher, the learner is capable of researching more advanced concepts in music and performance and developing strategies to apply these concepts to

You are never really fully out of any of these phases and never fully in any of them. Every new skill or concept you try to conquer puts you right back into the Fundemental phase for that concept, as you learn it and conquer it's phyisical challenges you move to Transitional, and finally when you learn to apply it you have become Self-actuating for that concept. Even Steve Vai or Segovia or whoever would be at the Fundemental level with any new technique or concept they were never before exposed to before. Granted, they may move through these phases at lightening speed compared to me or you.

Ask yourself; where do you think you fall on this continuum? What do you need to do to move to the next? What techniques or theorhetical concepts should you start working on to ensure you are always keeping a part of your studies firmly planted in each level.


Ok, thanks
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