#1
How do you approach learning a solo that sounds mostly improvised?

When looking at the tab, there are a lot of odd note groupings and unusual rhythms. The player probably wasn't thinking about this when recording it, he just played what "felt" right to him. Learning it note-for-note seems like an exercise in futility. The player probably never played it the same way twice.

What's the correct way to learn this kind of solo?
#2
There's no "correct" way to learn any songs really..you just do whatever suits you the best.
Here's what I'd probably do though:
Listen to it...a lot.
Figure out the stable points in the melody...usually you can figure out an implied chord progression in solos.
Once you have those nailed, you can fill in the blanks in between with pretty much anything that doesn't stray too far from the context of the music.
I hope that made some sense.
Good luck!
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#3
Experienced players rarely play what "feels" right, they play what sounds right...big difference.
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#4
If you're trying to learn an improvised solo note-for-note, it can become overwhelming quite quickly if you don't have a good 'map' to follow. If you're able to figure out what scale the player is using, the patterns usually begin to make a lot more sense.

You could be a fantastic player, but without knowing the guidelines the player used to improvise their solo, you're going to be stabbing in the dark when trying to transcribe it.
Last edited by Jwleggett at Aug 9, 2013,
#5
I mean for something like this, the fast part starting at 4:28
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=adV8-_hgL4g&t=4m28s

Obviously, he's aware of the scales and notes he's using, but rhythmically it's quite hard to follow. He's not adhering rigidly to 16th notes or triplets, but rather playing in a way that "floats above the rhythm". I doubt he counted the exact rhythmic spacing of each note.

I've seen many covers of various songs where the more intricate parts were not 100% true to the original, but followed the same melodic contour and the solo was still recognisable. Sometimes they missed a note or two, sometimes they used different techniques, but it was still identifiable as the same piece of music.

How important is it to exactly replicate every single pick stroke?

Paul Gilbert talks about rhythmic and non-rhythmic playing in this video. How do you go about playing the non-rhythmic stuff?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iFr3TRN2CWk
Last edited by sashki at Aug 10, 2013,
#6
Quote by sashki
How important is it to exactly replicate every single pick stroke?


Only you can decide that. Noe one else's opinion actually matters.

Quote by sashki
Paul Gilbert talks about rhythmic and non-rhythmic playing in this video. How do you go about playing the non-rhythmic stuff?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iFr3TRN2CWk


It really depends on your answer to the question above.

I guess a good way to do it would be to identify what happens exactly on the beat, which beats these things happen on and what happens in between and then just keep trying it until you get it right. I wouldn't bother about it that much personally though, as long as it sounds close enough I don't think you need to be that precise about it.
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#7
When playing a solo even improvised you naturally use techniques and licks you already know. It's like talking - you just use words you know. So if you are well accustomed with what you're playing and you understand it then recording an improvised solo and learning it later isn't really a difficult task. So when you want to learn a solo from any other guitarist i would recommend first trying to learn his style or some of his licks, rythm patterns and such and try to understand it then just learn the solo note by note
#8
sometimes i record my improvisations. and its usual for me not being able to play it again. and i say omg did i play it? it just frasturates me. and if you are on pro players haaha good lucks.
on jazz its like impossible to me but who knows who plays its cool... lol