#1
For a couple weeks I have been trying to learn the triplets at the beginning of the solo of Nightmare by Avenged Sevenfold. I can play it cleanly and consistently at 110 BPM (song is at 130) but even after daily repetition of this 5-second part (I've played it literally thousands of times), I can not increase my speed at all.

My routine every day is warming up by playing slow at 75 BPM and then increasing by increments of 5 until I reach 90 where I increase by increments of 2 and 105 where I increase by increments of 1.


This is extremely frustrating and I fear for the fact that I may end up with a smashed guitar if this continues

I appreciate any ideas on what I'm doing wrong. Thanks in advance!
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#2
Probably a tension issue, it normally is. The idea of starting slow is the reduction of unneeded muscle tension needed for a good(not necessarily small) motion.
#3
Yea, the faster you need less tension, when it is something real fast you do not even feel your left hand. But then you gotta play some more thousand times, there is nothing more to it.
#5
Quote by Facecut
not necessarily small


No such thing.

Quote by Facecut
I think we are talking about the right hand/forearm.


Neither hand or arm should be viewed in isolation; playing the guitar really well requires your whole body to be as relaxed as possible at all times.
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#7
It does if you're wanting to play fast - small motions = less wasted energy and more efficiency
Actually called Mark!

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#8
Obviously, but if you want to play fast and good you need articulation which sometimes requires bigger motions than speed only would suggest.
#9
Quote by Facecut
Obviously, but if you want to play fast and good you need articulation which sometimes requires bigger motions than speed only would suggest.


I've seen people with picking motions that would blow your mind with how small they are with incredible articulation and tone. Smaller is better if you want to play fast.
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#10
I talked about left hand only, cause usually people have no problems with that right one. Hitting notes hard is considered quality by many but when you are "shredding" it just not possible. "Shredders" just give very soft touch to the fingerboard, they may go hard with the right hand but not thru' increased motion, not possible either. But with higher tension which ends being painful.
Last edited by BananaJoe at Aug 8, 2013,
#11
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
I've seen people with picking motions that would blow your mind with how small they are with incredible articulation and tone. Smaller is better if you want to play fast.


Everybody makes different experiences I guess
#12
Quote by BananaJoe
"Shredders" just give very soft touch to the fingerboard, they may go hard with the right hand but not thru' increased motion, not possible either. But with higher tension which ends being painful.


Watch a lot of gypsy jazz players; they beat the crap out of their strings while maintaining relaxation and small picking motions. It's really not hard to do; you just use more of the pick while hitting the strings.

Quote by Facecut
Everybody makes different experiences I guess


Not so much. The vast majority of people are biologically the same, thus playing guitar should be the same for most people in a physical sense.
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#13
And yet they experience it differently. The gipsy players are a good example for my point. They use a special picking technique with an angled wrist for more volume and power. That is not the ideal posture for speed but it's the best posture for their sound. They value sound over speed, and in my experience you can't reduce motion infinitely without coming to the point of sacrifice.
Last edited by Facecut at Aug 9, 2013,
#15
Quote by Facecut
And yet they experience it differently. The gipsy players are a good example for my point. They use a special picking technique with an angled wrist for more volume and power. That is not the ideal posture for speed but it's the best posture for their sound. They value sound over speed, and in my experience you can't reduce motion infinitely without coming to the point of sacrifice.


Ok, now go back and watch the players who are properly fast (Bireli Lagrene, Stochelo Rosenberg and so on) and watch how small their motions are. They value tone but at no point do they seem to actually sacrifice speed for it at all.

Also Guthrie Govan, Paul Gilbert and Rick Graham all come to mind as people who have stupidly efficient picking and yet do not want for volume or articulation at all. All of them play physically as close to standard as I've ever seen.
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#16
Ok. Make sure you're comfortable with your string gauge, general setup of the guitar and the pick you're using. If you're using a flapping dorito to pick with, it's not going to happen easily. I like Jim Dunlop Jazz III's (although didn't at first). They offer something sturdy and controllable to get up to speed with.

There is a LOT to be said for the technique you are using (starting slowly / building up slowly). However, there is also a lot to be said for just going for it at 130bpm, hitting a load of bum notes with some correct ones in there, but keeping up with the song. If you play along with the song, you have an added pressure that you may not be getting from setting your own boundaries with the metronome.

(You could even try aiming for FASTER than 130. Nail THAT and 130 will feel like playing Twinkle Little Star.)
#17
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Ok, now go back and watch the players who are properly fast (Bireli Lagrene, Stochelo Rosenberg and so on) and watch how small their motions are. They value tone but at no point do they seem to actually sacrifice speed for it at all.

Also Guthrie Govan, Paul Gilbert and Rick Graham all come to mind as people who have stupidly efficient picking and yet do not want for volume or articulation at all. All of them play physically as close to standard as I've ever seen.


Yes I agree it's my standard too, but I have seen and heard smaller and I didn't like it. That's why I say not the smaller the better because the standard is not that small.