dany_100
Registered User
Join date: Feb 2009
1,673 IQ
#1
what is your typical recording volume in a studio?
is it around the 60-70db range(normal speaking)
or like at shouting volumes(cant hear your scream)80-90db
does it depents on the stage or recording?(inst. recording, mixing, mastering)
OfCourseNot
There's your answer
Join date: Dec 2010
580 IQ
#2
Personally or typically?

Drum are loud, especially with heavy metal. Screams are loud. Singing can be loud. Acoustic guitar is acoustic guitar. Bass is DI'd more nowadays. Electric guitar amps are usually not too loud, since there's no need to be heard 3 miles away. As far as decibel measurements go, I have none for you. But when I'm in the same room as the drums I'm recording, I wear my in-ear monitors or earplugs. I can get a great sound out of my amp at a decent volume without pissing my parents off. However it's still too loud for my apartment when I'm at university, so there's that.
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ChemicalFire
King of Bacon Pancakes
Join date: Oct 2007
5,773 IQ
#3
The number that always gets thrown around these days is about -12db rms.
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kyle62
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Join date: May 2007
1,619 IQ
#4
Quote by ChemicalFire
The number that always gets thrown around these days is about -12db rms.

I think we're talking SPL here, not dBFS

A lot of the time, quieter is better - just turn it up every so often to see how things work out. Mixing too loud can alter your perception quite a bit, although it's fun if you're in 'impress the client' mode.

As for tracking, whatever suits the instrument. Rock drums sound their best when played hard, and guitar amps need a healthy amount of volume to really get the amp/speaker interaction mojo going.
Last edited by kyle62 at Aug 11, 2013,
john.hoos.3
Dunbeg Studios
Join date: Jul 2013
99 IQ
#5
Hi, on the guitar amps, if using a valve amp for distorted sounds I always found it best to get it as loud as possible so that the valves are being driven. So this can be pretty loud, but I used to simply put a mic in front and the cover the whole set-up in duvets ! Problem solved and great recording sound.
kyle62
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#6
Quote by john.hoos.3
Hi, on the guitar amps, if using a valve amp for distorted sounds I always found it best to get it as loud as possible so that the valves are being driven. So this can be pretty loud, but I used to simply put a mic in front and the cover the whole set-up in duvets ! Problem solved and great recording sound.

Nice tip...when you're close-miking with a dynamic, nothing around the amp really matters as long as there's a clear link between the speaker and mic. YOu can stick it in a cupboard, out in the garden, under a mattress, whatever!

People really overestimate the importance of 'cranking it up to 11' though.

It's not neccessary for most modern amp designs and in some cases can actually make em sound worse. Vintage Marshalls, Vox etc that have no preamp gain sound great when you crank em up, you get some dirty power valve saturation.

However, modern amp designs (JCM800 onwards, Mesa Boogie, etc etc) tend to get their gain from the preamp section, and driving the power amp hard can make them sound a bit loose and flabby.
OfCourseNot
There's your answer
Join date: Dec 2010
580 IQ
#7
Quote by kyle62
Nice tip...when you're close-miking with a dynamic, nothing around the amp really matters as long as there's a clear link between the speaker and mic. YOu can stick it in a cupboard, out in the garden, under a mattress, whatever!

I'll have to disagree a bit on you with this one. In a regular room with/without treatment, the acoustics don't really make much of a difference at all with an amp at a decent volume and a close dynamic mic (within, say, 3 inches). However putting it in a cabinet or a closet or against a wall can GREATLY affect the sounds. That close to a hard surface will create reflections loud enough to be recorded and even cause interference via comb filtering.
Quote by WCPhils
According to that chart, women like men with a Pringle canister down there.
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Ibanez RG8
Blackstar HT 20 w/ Jet City cab
whole bunch o' pedals
kyle62
Need a dispenser here!
Join date: May 2007
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#8
Quote by OfCourseNot
I'll have to disagree a bit on you with this one. In a regular room with/without treatment, the acoustics don't really make much of a difference at all with an amp at a decent volume and a close dynamic mic (within, say, 3 inches). However putting it in a cabinet or a closet or against a wall can GREATLY affect the sounds. That close to a hard surface will create reflections loud enough to be recorded and even cause interference via comb filtering.

Agreed.

I'm thinking more about 'chucking a duvet over the whole thing' situations...once you add a hard surface to the mix you're asking for standing waves and comb filtering. Amp closets in studios and the insides of iso cabs tend to have a fair bit of absorbtive/reflective material to scatter the sound..
axemanchris
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Join date: Aug 2006
2,471 IQ
#9
Whatever sounds best. As always.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

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