#1
Does anyone else also have those days when they can play very cleanly and accurately but others where they cant even warm up cleanly (talking that 1234 or 1432 pattern everyone knows), even at like 60bpm it sounds horrible but all week I could play 16ths cleanly at like 115bpm
#2
Perfectly normal but the bad days do get better with practice. Half the point of practicing at all is to make sure that even on your bad days you're still good enough.
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#3
^ Think that sums it up perfectly.
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#6
That's typical about learning an instrument, it's not like studying where you get smarter every second you study, but it goes with ups and downs, some days/weeks you feel like you haven't improved in a while, others you feel like you have....

It's in waves

Atleast that's how I see it...
#7
Practicing technique is a bit like working out in my experience.
Practicing too much tends to wear you out- taking a day off every 5 or 6 days does wonders for accuracy in my experience. I've found that I'd struggle with a part for a week, then I'd not play for a day, then I'd try playing and boom the stuff I was having difficulty with suddenly becomes fluid and easy. It's happened time and time again with consistency, so I do not think it's a fluke. I might be wrong, but I'm guessing the day off allows your fingers to recover from all the practice.

Anyone else had this experience?
#8
I do something similarish.

Fairly intense practice for as long as possible at the weekends running through the songs I already know & learning a couple of new ones. Then I rarely play on Monday & Tuesday, but spend a few minutes here & there picturing what I've learnt in my head, thinking through all the new parts & simply imagining myself playing them. Then I do the odd hour here & there Wednesday to Friday depending on free time, but by then I'm almost always better at what I learnt over the weekend than last time I picked up my guitar.
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#9
Quote by GS LEAD 5
Practicing technique is a bit like working out in my experience.
Practicing too much tends to wear you out- taking a day off every 5 or 6 days does wonders for accuracy in my experience. I've found that I'd struggle with a part for a week, then I'd not play for a day, then I'd try playing and boom the stuff I was having difficulty with suddenly becomes fluid and easy. It's happened time and time again with consistency, so I do not think it's a fluke. I might be wrong, but I'm guessing the day off allows your fingers to recover from all the practice.

Anyone else had this experience?



I've found the occasional day away from the guitar is quite good for me... but I have had a few injuries now so I need to a day off for my body to heal!

If you are struggling to play something consistently though, practice playing it slower, otherwise you are just ingraining making mistakes into your muscle memory...
#10
Quote by Sam-Russell
I've found the occasional day away from the guitar is quite good for me... but I have had a few injuries now so I need to a day off for my body to heal!

If you are struggling to play something consistently though, practice playing it slower, otherwise you are just ingraining making mistakes into your muscle memory...


Na, its not the struggling as in making mistakes sort of struggling. More like the cant-play-it-right-unless-i-focus-every-bit-of-my-mind type, the sort which leaves you fatigued after around an hour of practice.

Thankfully, I can sweep pick perfectly till 120bpm now its beyond 120 that I bugger up though moar practice needed
#11
Everyone has good and bad days, even the greats. On top of that, playing in front of people is always about 50% worse than on your own, when nobody's listening. When you keep that in mind, you can only wonder how good the greats actually are when they're on their own, on a good day
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#12
Quote by HeretiK538
Everyone has good and bad days, even the greats. On top of that, playing in front of people is always about 50% worse than on your own, when nobody's listening. When you keep that in mind, you can only wonder how good the greats actually are when they're on their own, on a good day



I record myself sweep picking.


Then I open youtube and see Petrucci doing The Glass Prison.

And I think-
Okay, to sweep these 4 relatively simple arpeggios, I first need to warm up at 80bpm, and slowly move up to 120 in 10bpm steps, taking a total of almost 20 minutes, on my own.

This mother****er is doing 170 with totally ****ed up shapes, in front of a crowd, no gradual warming up, in a band where everyone else is also playing shit thats equally ****ed up, on a dark ass stage where you cant see squat.

What kind of weed is he on?
#13
Quote by GS LEAD 5
This mother****er is doing 170 with totally ****ed up shapes, in front of a crowd, no gradual warming up, in a band where everyone else is also playing shit thats equally ****ed up, on a dark ass stage where you cant see squat.


Firstly he warms up before shows. All the time. Secondly, being on stage doesn't tend to be as dark as it looks in live footage.

For example:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xRgQ-ab9O_k

The stage looks pretty dark from that footage but I could see what I was doing perfectly well enough.
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#14
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Firstly he warms up before shows. All the time. Secondly, being on stage doesn't tend to be as dark as it looks in live footage.

For example:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xRgQ-ab9O_k

The stage looks pretty dark from that footage but I could see what I was doing perfectly well enough.



Warm up as in, does doesnt sweep right after spending time warming up his sweeps. Usually has a few songs between warmup and the sweeps...
#15
Quote by GS LEAD 5
Warm up as in, does doesnt sweep right after spending time warming up his sweeps. Usually has a few songs between warmup and the sweeps...


I would say he probably warms up to the point where he's ready to play anything in the set; after all, if you're not going to do that then what's the point of warming up at all?
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

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“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


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#16
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
I would say he probably warms up to the point where he's ready to play anything in the set; after all, if you're not going to do that then what's the point of warming up at all?



That warmup must be more technical than the average band's entire discography then
#17
Totally normal. Cannot stress that enough.

Even people like Guthrie Govan and Chris Arp have days where they struggle. Even live. They just manage to hide it better.

Well, not Chris. After a long show his fingers are dead.
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