#1
Hi, I'm going to be doing some cleaning/maintenance on my bass and I was wondering what products I would need.

Im not going to be doing anything fancy, just cleaning a maple fretboard, polishing frets, and getting some rust off the screws and maybe pickups.

Also, while I'm at it, what strings would you guys recommend for someone who wants a little darker tone (since the Jazz Bass is made of all maple, so to counteract some of the "brightness" of maple) and plays mostly rock and funk/funk rock? I'm learning to slap and when I play live, I pick pretty hard on the strings.

If it helps, I have a Squier VM Jazz 70's Bass.
Bass gear:
-Squier Vintage Modified Jazz Bass
-Fender Rumble 15 Amp

Guitar Gear:
-Agile AL-2000
-Boss Tu-3 Tuner -> Joyo Vintage Overdrive -> Joyo Vintage Ultimate Overdrive -> Ernie Ball MVP -> TC Nova Repeater
Last edited by itzkpanda at Aug 12, 2013,
#2
Your best bet to get rust off of your pick-ups is to scrape it off with steel wool. I'd take the screws out and soak them in vinegar (fizzy cola works too and smells better). The best way to avoid rust is to clean your instrument regularly and prevent it from occurring in the first place.

You can wipe the body down with a generic guitar cleaner fluid to clean it, which you can buy from any guitar shop. Dunlop make a decent one. Don't use any sort of lemon oil on a maple board; most maple boards are finished, all you need to do is wipe it down with a cloth. To clean the frets, you can use steel wool again. Make sure you protect the fretboard with something while you do it (masking tape for example).

It's far easier to look after your bass if you just give it a wipe down each time you finish playing and you'll never run into rust problems etc. And it will look better.

As for less brightness, you could simply roll the tone off on your instrument, or some high end on your amplifier. Another option is a different type of string; half-wounds or flatwounds will have less high frequency content. Not really ideal if you're playing slap, though, and it won't make much difference to how it sounds now if your current strings are old/grimey. You could even consider a change of pick-ups, overwound pick-ups will have less highs.
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Last edited by Ziphoblat at Aug 12, 2013,
#3
Quote by Ziphoblat
Your best bet to get rust off of your pick-ups is to scrape it off with steel wool.

Uhhh for real? I don't think steel wool should go anywhere near pickups because when it gets stuck in there it'll ruin it.

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#4
Quote by jthm_guitarist
Uhhh for real? I don't think steel wool should go anywhere near pickups because when it gets stuck in there it'll ruin it.


I forgot to mention getting synthetic steel wool. I've known guitar techs use steel wool with no problems by taping around the edges of the pick-ups and being careful anyway, but probably best avoided.
Spare a Cow
Eat a Vegan
#5
Thanks for the information!
Do you know any specific steel wool I should get? I checked on Home Depot and Lowes and they have such a large variety.
Bass gear:
-Squier Vintage Modified Jazz Bass
-Fender Rumble 15 Amp

Guitar Gear:
-Agile AL-2000
-Boss Tu-3 Tuner -> Joyo Vintage Overdrive -> Joyo Vintage Ultimate Overdrive -> Ernie Ball MVP -> TC Nova Repeater
#6
Just for everyday wiping down/dusting/etc. get a good microfiber cloth.
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