#1
Hello, I put some Schallar strap locks on my Jackson DXMG (superstrat) a few months back and the screw closest to the neck is always loose and needs to be tightened quite often. The whole screw has even come out of the guitar a few times and I am quite worried incase it comes out during a gig.

Is there any home fixes for this and any other advice would be great.

Cheers
#2
I'm not too familiar with Schaller, as all my guitars have Dunlop strap locks. Maybe some loctite on the screw to keep it from coming undone?
#3
Well, when I first had problems with my standard strap buttons coming out of my guitar, I replaced the screws that came with it and put in some longer, probably better ones in place. That may work, may not.
Personally, never had a problem since.
#4
Use a toothpick. Break one off till it will fit cleanly back in the hole. Then re-insert strap lock screw. Wood filler will work too but messier application.
#6
I fixed one recently by taking a scrap of oak and trimming off a small piece - about 4mm diameter, which fit snugly in the hole, glued it in with PVA. Then I redrilled the hole for the screw.
A more 'proper' repair would be to drill the hole, glue in a dowel the same diameter, then drill for the screw.
This makes for a better fix than just putting in a bigger or longer screw.

This guy shows you how:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=--ZnYslfAnU
Last edited by sethasaurus at Aug 13, 2013,
#7
Quote by flexiblemile
stop spending money on straplocks


He's already got the straplocks so I don't see how this is helpful. Screws come loose with regular strap buttons too.
The beer top is a neat little trick but straplocks aren't exactly expensive. They're also easier to pop on and off quickly and they don't look like you have a cheap rubber gasket on top of your strap.

The toothpick or wood sliver shim is easy and holds well.
#8
I realize that and if he can fix it himself, great. But I just want to make sure he knows that there is a free-ish solution. I remember when I was 16 and I wanted to buy straplocks for my two guitars, I thought they were expensive... Since I don't know the financial situation of the original poster, I shouldn't assume he can afford repairs/replacements.
#9
He doesn't need repairs or replacements for the straplock, though.

If the straplock itself were faulty that would be useful but it's just the screw hole has widened. Putting the original strap button back would yield the same problem. (Or if it wouldn't, he should just use that screw instead, most are interchangeable with Schaller screws). This is a wood problem, not a straplock problem. There's no need to "afford" anything, you literally need a splinter of wood and five minutes with a screwdriver.
#10
Don't buy new straplocks. Don't buy larger screws. You don't need any of that. Just put a piece of a toothpick inside the hole and screw the button back in.

Problem solved. You don't even need to use glue- the screw itself holds it all together.

I can't believe people make such a huge fuss over what is such a simple fix.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Aug 13, 2013,
#11
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Don't buy new straplocks. Don't buy larger screws. You don't need any of that. Just put a piece of a toothpick inside the hole and screw the button back in.

Problem solved. You don't even need to use glue- the screw itself holds it all together.

I can't believe people make such a huge fuss over what is such a simple fix.


Yeah, but you should have added "YMMV" on that tip...
#12
Quote by sethasaurus
Yeah, but you should have added "YMMV" on that tip...

I don't see how, you would have to be numb to fuck it up.
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

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I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Aug 13, 2013,
#13
Using a toothpick is only a temporary fix, and for a significant fit I would actually use 2 or 3.

Just take a tooth pick, stick it inside the hole - mark the toothpick where it protrudes out of the hole and cut it. You should be able to stick the toothpick(s) into the hole and not have anything extra sticking out of the hole, you want to get as even with the surface of the guitar as possible.

Then, you want to dip your toothpick(s) in some wood glue and stick them in the hole as tight as possible, and then wait a couple hours for it to dry. You can then re-thread your screw.

Your probably going to have to do this again in a couple months (give or take) which isn't really a big deal, but if you want a permanent fix you basically follow the same steps except you use a wooden dowel of rod (matchsticks work perfectly, believe it or not) instead of a toothpick.

The idea is to re-fill the hole with wood so that your threads will bite and hold. Don't skip using glue, but don't get messy either. Any wet glue that spurts out of the pilot hole should be wiped away with a wet cloth before its allowed to dry.
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#14
Well, some people use duct tape. I never have..
Just, if you're gigging, and it IS such a simple and easy fix, then you may as well make the most solid repair you can.
Keep your toothpicks for picking your teeth.
(Duct tape is good for a lot of other things, ironically - not ducts though).
Last edited by sethasaurus at Aug 13, 2013,
#15
Quote by Vypor
Using a toothpick is only a temporary fix, and for a significant fit I would actually use 2 or 3.

Just take a tooth pick, stick it inside the hole - mark the toothpick where it protrudes out of the hole and cut it. You should be able to stick the toothpick(s) into the hole and not have anything extra sticking out of the hole, you want to get as even with the surface of the guitar as possible.

Then, you want to dip your toothpick(s) in some wood glue and stick them in the hole as tight as possible, and then wait a couple hours for it to dry. You can then re-thread your screw.

Your probably going to have to do this again in a couple months (give or take) which isn't really a big deal, but if you want a permanent fix you basically follow the same steps except you use a wooden dowel of rod (matchsticks work perfectly, believe it or not) instead of a toothpick.

The idea is to re-fill the hole with wood so that your threads will bite and hold. Don't skip using glue, but don't get messy either. Any wet glue that spurts out of the pilot hole should be wiped away with a wet cloth before its allowed to dry.



You really do not have to do any of this. You do not need to use glue, because the threads of the screw will bite into the existing threads in the guitar body and cut threading into the toothpick itself. The pressure applied to the toothpick is the same as that as a screw going into the guitar body itself.

As for it being a 'temporary fix', I used one toothpick without any glue with my explorer. I've been playing that guitar with a strap for the last 5 years and it hasn't budged whatsoever. My explorer is a heavy guitar too, and it was done on the strap button that takes most of the weight of the guitar.
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I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Aug 13, 2013,
#16
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE


You really do not have to do any of this. You do not need to use glue, because the threads of the screw will bite into the existing threads in the guitar body and cut threading into the toothpick itself. The pressure applied to the toothpick is the same as that as a screw going into the guitar body itself.

As for it being a 'temporary fix', I used one toothpick without any glue with my explorer. I've been playing that guitar with a strap for the last 5 years and it hasn't budged whatsoever. My explorer is a heavy guitar too, and it was done on the strap button that takes most of the weight of the guitar.



Basically this. I've done the toothpick trick many times and I haven't had a problem yet. You definitely don't need glue.
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#17
Glue just makes it so you can't back the thing out again if you ever need to, or will crack your finish or destroy the screw hole if you do manage to get it out. Gluing a screw into wood negates the whole point of using a screw. If it's so bad that you have to actually glue something in, you should be using a dowel and re-drilling instead.

A shim is not a temporary solution. I don't see how a toothpick is a "couple of months" fix but a matchstick is somehow permanent? They're basically the same thing. If you shim properly it will hold for years. I've got a shim in my Les Paul that's been there for 5 years, and it's never budged.
#18
To each his own I suppose - from my experience toothpicks are only a temporary fix. This happened to my V and several other guitars, and after using toothpicks with no glue it took only a couple months for the screw to start unsettling again.

After using glue and a couple hours to set, I've never had the problem again and am not really worried about it in the future. Like I said, its not really a big deal if you have to get new toothpicks and do it again because its easy. I'd just rather use matchsticks and glue and never have to worry about it again.

EDIT: I never suggested gluing the screw into the guitar. I only suggested gluing the toothpicks/dowel into the hole and letting it dry.
Treble>Epiphone Prophecy EX - MXR micro Amp - MXR Blue Box - MXR Fullbore - MXR Noise Clamp - Vox AD30VT
Bass>Ibanez BTB505 - MXR Blowtorch - MXR D.I. - Peavey MaxBass 700 - Peavey TVX410
Last edited by Vypor at Aug 13, 2013,