#1
So, I just bought an Orange Tiny Terror, and I'm gonna be plugging it in a 1x12 Orange cab... My amp only has one channel. I really wanted two, obvy, but it was a little up there on the price for now... Sooo.... If I want to go from clean to crunch, can I plug in my OCD, or distortion pedal on clean through the tube amp?

I mean... I don't want to... I'll be rocking on the high gain as much as I can, but a lot of my songs I like to put in a clean intro, and then blast some distortion at everyone.... So, can I do that?

I don't know everything there is to know about the amp stuff. Totally new, I've been jammin' on a combo amp up until now, and that's pretty straight forward.. But yeah.. Help?
Last edited by RamblinMan2450 at Aug 16, 2013,
#2
Just use your volume control on your guitar and your picking to control how broken up the sound gets.
Quote by barden1069
A "tubescreamer" is a person paid by a guitarist to stand behind the amp and scream at the tubes. This terrifies the tubes into overdriving and delivers a thick, harmonic-rich tone.
#4
So your saying, I can totes plug in a pedal, just an extra distortion is completely unnecessary, and therefore will give me some crap sound?

And... I got the Tiny Terror, because it was cheapish? And I liked the sound...
#5
I'd recommend an overdrive pedal like a tube screamer or similar to run as a clean boost, rather than a distortion pedal. Couple that with effective use of your guitar's volume control you should be able to go from clean to distorted well enough in a live setting where both tones are passable.
"Air created the greenness. And once you've got something, that leads to otherness." - Karl Pilkington.
#6
How long ago and where did you get the Tiny Terror? I'd take it back and invest in a 2 channel amp. What was your budget?
Gibson Les Paul Studio
Highway One Telecaster
Dean Evo
Mesa F-50
Laney GH50L
Vox AC30 C2
Ampeg V2
pedals
#7
If you want to use the natural amp's overdrive/ distortion , then you can't make a pedal give you the clean sound, your best shot is what's been advised up , used your guitar's volume pot efficiently, but you can set the amp on clean and use a pedal like an ocd for overdrive, or if you want distortion , any distortion pedal you want.
#8
it's gonna be a compromise nomatter what you do, unfortunately.

the way that works best for me when using a single channel amp (when I want to use the amp's distortion) is to dial in a crunch tone on the amp. Clean it up with the guitar's volume control (a treble bleed cap on the guitar volume will help it retain treble when the volume is rolled down, if your guitar goes all murky when you roll the guitar's volume knob down). When you want heavier distortion hit it with an overdrive/boost pedal. Personally I use a transparent od pedal for a rhythm boost for high gain rhythm tones (e.g. a timmy/bluesbreaker/bd2/digitech screamin blues or something like that) and then a tubescreamer-style pedal for a lead boost (i.e. both pedals on at once).

you can dial in the amp clean and use a distortion pedal if you wish, but you won't get the amp's distortion tone, either, you'll mainly be getting the sound of the pedal. that won't necessarily sound bad per se (and doing that can be a way to get distortion tones which your amp doesn't do if you need a variety of different distortion tones), but if you bought the amp because you like its distortion tone, then going the boost route I outlined above is probably a better idea.

of course, you can always do both and get all the pedals
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#9
Quote by Lavatain
I'd recommend an overdrive pedal like a tube screamer or similar to run as a clean boost, rather than a distortion pedal. Couple that with effective use of your guitar's volume control you should be able to go from clean to distorted well enough in a live setting where both tones are passable.


+1

That amp doesn't have an FX loop, right?
Spin 'round carousel when your horse isn't screwed in.

My band:
Fractured Instinct
(For fans of Death/Groove/Prog Metal)

Ibanez RGA42E
Ibanez S420
LTD H-301
Ibanez RG520
Peavey Predator USA
Douglas Grendel 725
Line 6 Pod HD500X
#10
Quote by LaidBack
How long ago and where did you get the Tiny Terror? I'd take it back and invest in a 2 channel amp. What was your budget?

I got it a couple days ago from GC. I trust the company, and know it's reliable, so besides that, I got it because I really love the orange tone. I got it for $300... And I would've gotten a 2 channel if the amp were all I was getting. I had to buy a cab too. But yeah. I wasn't aware of any reliable company that would sell a 2 channel amp for that much. :/
#11
Quote by Dave_Mc
it's gonna be a compromise nomatter what you do, unfortunately.

the way that works best for me when using a single channel amp (when I want to use the amp's distortion) is to dial in a crunch tone on the amp. Clean it up with the guitar's volume control (a treble bleed cap on the guitar volume will help it retain treble when the volume is rolled down, if your guitar goes all murky when you roll the guitar's volume knob down). When you want heavier distortion hit it with an overdrive/boost pedal. Personally I use a transparent od pedal for a rhythm boost for high gain rhythm tones (e.g. a timmy/bluesbreaker/bd2/digitech screamin blues or something like that) and then a tubescreamer-style pedal for a lead boost (i.e. both pedals on at once).

you can dial in the amp clean and use a distortion pedal if you wish, but you won't get the amp's distortion tone, either, you'll mainly be getting the sound of the pedal. that won't necessarily sound bad per se (and doing that can be a way to get distortion tones which your amp doesn't do if you need a variety of different distortion tones), but if you bought the amp because you like its distortion tone, then going the boost route I outlined above is probably a better idea.

of course, you can always do both and get all the pedals


... Uh, treble bleed cap? -_-

And... I think I get what you're saying... SO CONFUSING. You mean use the pedal backwards kinda? Like Get the crunch on the amp, but then make the crunch clean, so when I hit the pedal off it goes to the amp crunch? Whaa?
Legit, talk to me like I'm a four year old.
OR, now that I read it over... The pedal is still playing a part in the crunch, but it won't sound like the pedal in the format that you've attempted to explain to me?
#14
ah sorry if that was confusing I'll try to elaborate on it a bit

Treble bleed

You may well not need a treble bleed cap, if your guitar sounds fine when you roll the volume down you don't need to do anything (or it may already have a treble bleed cap fitted).

There are a couple of (very simple) circuits for doing it. Normally you just wire a capacitor across the volume pot, or you can use a capacitor plus a resistor.

http://www.ratcliffe.co.za/articles/volumepot2.shtml That's more information than you need, the second half of that page is where it shows you the wiring diagrams. But if you can be bothered reading it all, you might as well.

Amp settings

Ok, say you normally set your amp up to get the distortion amount you want with the gain control on 8.

Instead of setting the gain control on the amp to 8, set it to 6. This'll give you less distortion than usual, but that's the whole point.

When you want cleans, roll your guitar's volume control down to 2 or 3. (Because you have less distortion dialled in to the amp, the amp should clean up better. If it still doesn't clean up well with your guitar's volume control, turn the amp's gain control down a little more. You're basically trying to turn the amp's gain control to the highest amount where it still cleans up with your guitar's volume control.)

When you want more distortion, roll your guitar's volume control back up to 10. And kick in the overdrive pedal.

You normally set the overdrive pedal with the pedal's gain control on 0, but its level/volume control on 10 (and tone to taste, normally around 12-2 o'clock). What this does is give your signal a massive boost, a bit like using hotter pickups. It means that the pedal is adding no (or very little) of its own distortion, but it's boosting your amp so the amp's preamp tubes overdrive more (which is similar to, though not exactly the same as, turning the gain control up on your amp).

Basically it's a clever little trick which lets you fool a single channel amp into acting like a multi-channel amp. And where the vast majority of the distortion is still created by your tube amp, as opposed to using a distortion pedal into your amp set up clean, where all the distortion is coming from the pedal.

if you want an extra boost for solos, you can kick in a second overdrive pedal set the same way. Also, bear in mind that those settings on the pedal only work if your amp is already fairly distorted. if your amp is clean it'll give you a massive boost in volume which'll blow your ears out. So be careful, lol.

This basically gives you several different tones at your feet:

Clean: all pedals off with guitar volume rolled down to 2 or 3 (in fact, sometimes you can even roll back to clean with the pedals still on, if you're lucky).

Crunch: All pedals off with guitar volume up full.

High Gain rhythm tone: Guitar volume up full, one overdrive pedal turned on.

Lead: Guitar volume up full, both overdrive pedals on.


(You can also get slight variations there too, depending on which od pedal you have turned on, and by adjusting your guitar volume control when you also have the pedals on to get a wide variety of distortion amounts and tones.)

if you still don't understand, just ask again and I'll try to simplify it further.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Aug 16, 2013,
#15
Quote by Dave_Mc
ah sorry if that was confusing I'll try to elaborate on it a bit

Treble bleed

You may well not need a treble bleed cap, if your guitar sounds fine when you roll the volume down you don't need to do anything (or it may already have a treble bleed cap fitted).

There are a couple of (very simple) circuits for doing it. Normally you just wire a capacitor across the volume pot, or you can use a capacitor plus a resistor.

http://www.ratcliffe.co.za/articles/volumepot2.shtml That's more information than you need, the second half of that page is where it shows you the wiring diagrams. But if you can be bothered reading it all, you might as well.

Amp settings

Ok, say you normally set your amp up to get the distortion amount you want with the gain control on 8.

Instead of setting the gain control on the amp to 8, set it to 6. This'll give you less distortion than usual, but that's the whole point.

When you want cleans, roll your guitar's volume control down to 2 or 3. (Because you have less distortion dialled in to the amp, the amp should clean up better. If it still doesn't clean up well with your guitar's volume control, turn the amp's gain control down a little more. You're basically trying to turn the amp's gain control to the highest amount where it still cleans up with your guitar's volume control.)

When you want more distortion, roll your guitar's volume control back up to 10. And kick in the overdrive pedal.

You normally set the overdrive pedal with the pedal's gain control on 0, but its level/volume control on 10 (and tone to taste, normally around 12-2 o'clock). What this does is give your signal a massive boost, a bit like using hotter pickups. It means that the pedal is adding no (or very little) of its own distortion, but it's boosting your amp so the amp's preamp tubes overdrive more (which is similar to, though not exactly the same as, turning the gain control up on your amp).

Basically it's a clever little trick which lets you fool a single channel amp into acting like a multi-channel amp. And where the vast majority of the distortion is still created by your tube amp, as opposed to using a distortion pedal into your amp set up clean, where all the distortion is coming from the pedal.

if you want an extra boost for solos, you can kick in a second overdrive pedal set the same way. Also, bear in mind that those settings on the pedal only work if your amp is already fairly distorted. if your amp is clean it'll give you a massive boost in volume which'll blow your ears out. So be careful, lol.

This basically gives you several different tones at your feet:

Clean: all pedals off with guitar volume rolled down to 2 or 3 (in fact, sometimes you can even roll back to clean with the pedals still on, if you're lucky).

Crunch: All pedals off with guitar volume up full.

High Gain rhythm tone: Guitar volume up full, one overdrive pedal turned on.

Lead: Guitar volume up full, both overdrive pedals on.


(You can also get slight variations there too, depending on which od pedal you have turned on, and by adjusting your guitar volume control when you also have the pedals on to get a wide variety of distortion amounts and tones.)

if you still don't understand, just ask again and I'll try to simplify it further.



So in both cases, both pedals are set with the gain at zero?

I'm trying to figure out lead tones. Won't two pedals lead to more distortion? Shouldn't the Rhythm part be more distorted?
Washburn MG-44(E)
Ibanez RG421 (Eb)
Art & Lutherie Electric Cutaway
Vox Valvetronix VT40
Vox AC4tv 1x10
Vox Original Wah-Wah Pedal V847-A
MXR '78 Custom Badass Distortion
#16
Quote by Dave_Mc
ah sorry if that was confusing I'll try to elaborate on it a bit

Treble bleed

You may well not need a treble bleed cap, if your guitar sounds fine when you roll the volume down you don't need to do anything (or it may already have a treble bleed cap fitted).

There are a couple of (very simple) circuits for doing it. Normally you just wire a capacitor across the volume pot, or you can use a capacitor plus a resistor.

http://www.ratcliffe.co.za/articles/volumepot2.shtml That's more information than you need, the second half of that page is where it shows you the wiring diagrams. But if you can be bothered reading it all, you might as well.

Amp settings

Ok, say you normally set your amp up to get the distortion amount you want with the gain control on 8.

Instead of setting the gain control on the amp to 8, set it to 6. This'll give you less distortion than usual, but that's the whole point.

When you want cleans, roll your guitar's volume control down to 2 or 3. (Because you have less distortion dialled in to the amp, the amp should clean up better. If it still doesn't clean up well with your guitar's volume control, turn the amp's gain control down a little more. You're basically trying to turn the amp's gain control to the highest amount where it still cleans up with your guitar's volume control.)

When you want more distortion, roll your guitar's volume control back up to 10. And kick in the overdrive pedal.

You normally set the overdrive pedal with the pedal's gain control on 0, but its level/volume control on 10 (and tone to taste, normally around 12-2 o'clock). What this does is give your signal a massive boost, a bit like using hotter pickups. It means that the pedal is adding no (or very little) of its own distortion, but it's boosting your amp so the amp's preamp tubes overdrive more (which is similar to, though not exactly the same as, turning the gain control up on your amp).

Basically it's a clever little trick which lets you fool a single channel amp into acting like a multi-channel amp. And where the vast majority of the distortion is still created by your tube amp, as opposed to using a distortion pedal into your amp set up clean, where all the distortion is coming from the pedal.

if you want an extra boost for solos, you can kick in a second overdrive pedal set the same way. Also, bear in mind that those settings on the pedal only work if your amp is already fairly distorted. if your amp is clean it'll give you a massive boost in volume which'll blow your ears out. So be careful, lol.

This basically gives you several different tones at your feet:

Clean: all pedals off with guitar volume rolled down to 2 or 3 (in fact, sometimes you can even roll back to clean with the pedals still on, if you're lucky).

Crunch: All pedals off with guitar volume up full.

High Gain rhythm tone: Guitar volume up full, one overdrive pedal turned on.

Lead: Guitar volume up full, both overdrive pedals on.


(You can also get slight variations there too, depending on which od pedal you have turned on, and by adjusting your guitar volume control when you also have the pedals on to get a wide variety of distortion amounts and tones.)

if you still don't understand, just ask again and I'll try to simplify it further.


Thanks man, I think I got it this time. I'm getting my cab tomorrow, so if I'll experiment with it and hopefully see what's up with it. But thanks for taking the time and explaining it to a silly shnub like myself.
#17
Another option: Do you have any other amps? You could use the other amp for clean tones and your Orange for distortion. You would just need to buy an A/B pedal.

Oh, and there are lots of people who use pedals to get their distortion sounds. But yeah, you kind of bought the amp for its distortion. And it would be kind of stupid to buy it for distortion sounds only and then decide not to use the amp distortion but pedals.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#18
Quote by Shadowofravenwo
(a) So in both cases, both pedals are set with the gain at zero?

I'm trying to figure out lead tones. (b) Won't two pedals lead to more distortion? (c) Shouldn't the Rhythm part be more distorted?


(a) yep

(b) yep

(c) normally you want more distortion (and compression) for your lead passages. But there may be some specific instances where you want less distortion. In which case, just turn the pedal off, I suppose (or roll down the guitar volume control a bit).

Quote by RamblinMan2450
Thanks man, I think I got it this time. I'm getting my cab tomorrow, so if I'll experiment with it and hopefully see what's up with it. But thanks for taking the time and explaining it to a silly shnub like myself.


no worries
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#19
I used to play on a TT and now use an OR15 as my primary amp. I dial them in for gain, with the OR it's about noon, with the TT it was about 1 o'clock. I run a clean boost up front, currently a boost-a grande set about noon. With both amps, rolling the guitar volume back about 25% cleaned it up well enough, soft picking really helps with keeping it clean. With the guitar at full volume they have a nice, fat overdriven sound. Kicking on the boost doesn't give much of an increase in volume, but it definitely increases the gain.

Generally with a gresch with de armond 2k single coils.

Maybe not the sound for you, I don't know, but I really dig the little orange heads.
Quote by CodChick


Seriously, I'm not a fan of iphones and guitars mixing.
Last edited by ecvMatt at Aug 17, 2013,
#20
Quote by ecvMatt
soft picking really helps with keeping it clean.


+1, I meant to say that earlier too but then forgot. Sometimes you can even dial the amp in that it's crunchy when you dig in but clean (or cleanish) when you pick lightly.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#21
Quote by Dave_Mc
(a) yep

(b) yep

(c) normally you want more distortion (and compression) for your lead passages. But there may be some specific instances where you want less distortion. In which case, just turn the pedal off, I suppose (or roll down the guitar volume control a bit).


Thanks man. You just solved a lot of tone mystery, including why Slash has a Blues Driver in his effects chain if he is a Les Paul through a cranked Marshsll guy.
Washburn MG-44(E)
Ibanez RG421 (Eb)
Art & Lutherie Electric Cutaway
Vox Valvetronix VT40
Vox AC4tv 1x10
Vox Original Wah-Wah Pedal V847-A
MXR '78 Custom Badass Distortion
#22
no worries, glad i could help a little
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#23
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Another option: Do you have any other amps? You could use the other amp for clean tones and your Orange for distortion. You would just need to buy an A/B pedal.

Oh, and there are lots of people who use pedals to get their distortion sounds. But yeah, you kind of bought the amp for its distortion. And it would be kind of stupid to buy it for distortion sounds only and then decide not to use the amp distortion but pedals.


By amp you mean the head right? Because in the general sense, I have a little Orange combo amp.. But otherwise this was my first half stack purchase. :/
#24
Quote by RamblinMan2450
By amp you mean the head right? Because in the general sense, I have a little Orange combo amp.. But otherwise this was my first half stack purchase. :/

Head or combo. Both are amps. If you use an A/B pedal, you can have both amps on and get your clean tone from the combo and distortion tone from the stack. And of course you could connect the combo to the cabinet (though I'm not sure if it has a speaker output). The combo may not have the best cleans but it's better than no cleans. I think it's at least worth a try. I think you could build an A/B pedal by yourself and it would be cheaper than buying one.

So you would have a cable from your guitar connected to the A/B pedal and from the first output of the pedal a cable going to your stack (distorted) and from the second output of the pedal a cable going to your combo (clean). Then you would just need to stomp on the pedal to switch between clean and distortion.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115