Burrito5911
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2013
153 IQ
#1
So I am probably an intermediate guitarist who is interested in rock blues country and metal. I only know two full solos mark knoflers first solo on sultans of swing and the solo on yellow Ledbetter by pearl jam. (also know half of claptons 24 nights solo on white room) I was wondering how much will learning to play other peoples solos help with my own improvisation?
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steven seagull
not really a seagull
Join date: Oct 2006
1,064 IQ
#3
Very. Learning solos gives you experience of other people's music, people who are far more experienced and knowledgeable than you are. It let's you how other people use different musical ideas in different contexts and gives you an insight into some of the thinking behind those little moments of inspiration that good players always come up with, a twist on a familiar phrase, an unexpected note or chord, or a simple melody used at exactly the right time.

Improvising is creating music spontaneously, it's not moving your fingers round and hoping for the best. Good improvisers are acutely aware of their musical surroundings, always listening to their backing and usually thinking ahead if it's a piece they know as opposed to a complete free-form situation. They choose what to play based on how it will work with their backing, they know when to put themselves forward but crucially when to ease off a bit.

Good improvisation comes with technical ability, musical understanding but most crucially musical experience, and the best way to develop that is to spend some time following in the footsteps of those greater than you.
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dazzzer30
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2013
1,606 IQ
#4
I take time out to improvise solo over made up chords normally just 3or 4 chords on my loop pedal , I always start out feeling lost but start by using the scale. when I go off track which is try to forget about the scale and to start playing notes that I imagine might sound good and how I want it is quite hard , sometimes it doesn’t sound good but because I play mostly rock I guess the pentatonic scale covers a lot .
raredesign
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2012
54 IQ
#5
One thing that will help, is to sing the notes while you play them. Obviously start slow, but with practice, your fingers will land on what you hear in your head. Set the guitar down for a second, and whistle or scat to a backing track. If you have the imagination and ear for it, now it is a matter of connecting the guitar to your voice.
wyldelife
Registered User
Join date: May 2007
1,792 IQ
#6
I ****in' love mr. seagull! What he said!!
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dazzzer30
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2013
1,606 IQ
#8
I am not an expert on this but maybe if you want to improve on your improvising why not learn licks . Just an idea but I have been trying to find some easy licks and just improvise with the lick .
raredesign
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2012
54 IQ
#9
Quote by Dreamdancer11
“The only way you can get good, unless you're a genius, is to copy. That's the best thing. Just steal.” - Ritchie Blackmore


Wow, I don't think I have heard a quote I disagree with more. Unless...hmm, maybe I am a genius. Alright, carry on. :-)
Fallenoath
My minds playin' tricks
Join date: Feb 2012
985 IQ
#10
Quote by Dreamdancer11
“The only way you can get good, unless you're a genius, is to copy. That's the best thing. Just steal.” - Ritchie Blackmore


Yeah man!
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Dave_Mc
Chirp and Swirl
Join date: Mar 2005
2,968 IQ
#11
Quote by Dreamdancer11
“The only way you can get good, unless you're a genius, is to copy. That's the best thing. Just steal.” - Ritchie Blackmore


LOL agreed.

I've heard the more general (non-attributed) version, which is possibly even more cynical:

"talent borrows, genius steals"



the other thing is, you don't even have to feel guilty- those kickass players you're copying weren't playing 100% original stuff either, even they were building on what came before (most of the time, anyway).
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I saw in a couple of pictures that on Bucketheads Les Paul (only some pictures) that his neck pickup is painted in white. Can anyone explain to me why he would do this, and if there are any pros and cons.

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Dreamdancer11
Registered User
Join date: Nov 2012
38 IQ
#12
Quote by Dave_Mc
LOL agreed.

I've heard the more general (non-attributed) version, which is possibly even more cynical:

"talent borrows, genius steals"



the other thing is, you don't even have to feel guilty- those kickass players you're copying weren't playing 100% original stuff either, even they were building on what came before (most of the time, anyway).


I agree and lets not forget one more thing....if Richie Blackmore one of the most influencial people in rock and metal said that then who is this elusive freaking genius? i guess he hides really well .
Dave_Mc
Chirp and Swirl
Join date: Mar 2005
2,968 IQ
#13
nigel tufnel
Quote by crownegamers
I saw in a couple of pictures that on Bucketheads Les Paul (only some pictures) that his neck pickup is painted in white. Can anyone explain to me why he would do this, and if there are any pros and cons.

Quote by dspellman
The guy wears a KFC Bucket and a white mask during performances, and you're interested in the color of his pickup covers?