#1
Hi, iv been playing guitar for a few years now and i feel a little lost in where to go from where i am and has resulted in a bit of guitar neglect. and just after a little help from people that have been in the same position that i am in right now! my style of playing is metal (children of bodom, jeff loomis, lamb of god ect ect...) but i do delve into other styles and would like a real rounded playing style, and any help to progress will be greatly appreciated

cheers
#2
I've been playing a bit more than 4 years and i have went through this same thing a lot. I've come to accept it really. I used to play all day every day for the first 2 years or so almost religiously. Now i play whenever i feel like it, usually 4-5 hours a week over 3-5 separate days.

You have to understand that as much as we all want to improve that you shouldn't force it. Never make playing guitar a chore. I know you've probably heard it countless times but it's the honest truth. Embrace the days when you don't play, because there will come a day probably a couple days later where you want nothing more than to play guitar for the sheer joy of it.

I play similar music to you and my biggest suggestion is be open minded. Listen to different stuff. Genre's you never even considered. Hell i went through a period where i listened to only reggae (i still love reggae) and then got into a phase not so long ago where all i wanted to do was play flamenco. I still listen to metal most the time but there's only so much of the same music you can play before it gets a bit dull. Try listening to something you normally never would for a while. Chances are you'll find something you like. In the end you'll almost definitely come back to metal sooner or later, but the great thing is that when you do come back it will be way more fun and refreshing than it was previously.
Try other things like writing your own music, maybe learn a bit of theory, and my personal favourite;

Find a backing track you like, and solo over it. This is surprisingly more fun than it sounds. That or find a very basic song you really like and write a lead line for the whole song.

Anyways, i hope you take at least some of the things i said into consideration.
Remember, it's perfectly normal to not play the guitar.
#3
thanks for your input, and i will take it into consideration... i do enjoy a lot of other styles and i do enjoy flemenco myself. i was just after a bit of advice on what scales and techniques i should learn in progression. i understand what you mean about not forcing it and i dont really play much myself and a lot of that is due to life and being stuck in a musical rut where my guitars are more ornamental then instruments lol.
#4
Quote by sil80drift
thanks for your input, and i will take it into consideration... i do enjoy a lot of other styles and i do enjoy flemenco myself. i was just after a bit of advice on what scales and techniques i should learn in progression. i understand what you mean about not forcing it and i dont really play much myself and a lot of that is due to life and being stuck in a musical rut where my guitars are more ornamental then instruments lol.


I think vayne kind of hit that on the head already. You've probably hit a point where you've already learned the techniques you wanted to learn, and I think what vayne was trying to insinuate, among other things, was that you should be moving toward learning techniques that you either never wanted to learn before or thought 'why bother?'.

It's also not all just about scales and techniques either. styles are equally, if not more important. i.e. what makes jazz tick?

Also, don't think of things as a laundry list anymore. After you've done the tremolo picking, the vibrato, the bends, the sweeps, etc etc etc, you're now in the market to expand into other things at your own pace and in your own order.

Flamenco is an awesome place to start if you enjoy that. Start learning everything there is to learn about flamenco until you're bored of that. Then, let's say you kinda like jazz. Learn all the techniques associated with that. The world is your oyster at this point.

The best part about all of that, is that when/if you go back to playing metal, you're acquiring a plethora of new things to bring to your solo/rhythm playing and you'll probably find that learning other things is going to improve what you already knew quite a bit also.
#5
Quote by mjones1992
I think vayne kind of hit that on the head already. You've probably hit a point where you've already learned the techniques you wanted to learn, and I think what vayne was trying to insinuate, among other things, was that you should be moving toward learning techniques that you either never wanted to learn before or thought 'why bother?'.

It's also not all just about scales and techniques either. styles are equally, if not more important. i.e. what makes jazz tick?

Also, don't think of things as a laundry list anymore. After you've done the tremolo picking, the vibrato, the bends, the sweeps, etc etc etc, you're now in the market to expand into other things at your own pace and in your own order.

Flamenco is an awesome place to start if you enjoy that. Start learning everything there is to learn about flamenco until you're bored of that. Then, let's say you kinda like jazz. Learn all the techniques associated with that. The world is your oyster at this point.

The best part about all of that, is that when/if you go back to playing metal, you're acquiring a plethora of new things to bring to your solo/rhythm playing and you'll probably find that learning other things is going to improve what you already knew quite a bit also.


All good points and i definitely agree with not thinking of things as a "laundry list". Also I don't want you to just think yeah okay I'm gonna go play flamenco because this guy did it. I just used that as an example because it's something i really got into when in your situation. Might be different for you. Who knows, you might start getting into some classical composers like Bach, Beethoven etc and decide you want to do your own arrangements of that. Maybe you hear some funk and that resonates with you and you start getting into bass techniques such as slap guitar (i got into that infact). Maybe you hear some ska and enjoy the shit out of it. Maybe video game soundtracks do it for you?
All I'm trying to say are the possibilities are endless and for everyone it will be different. It's super important to broaden your musical horizons. There's some seriously ****ing diehard metalheads out there that will say metal is all they listen to, but they're just being narrow minded. Every person in existence can like more than one genre if they don't be stubborn and narrow minded. Even bands at the pinnacle of metal such as Metallica / Slipknot etc have influences beyond heavy metal. Just because you like heavy metal it doesn't mean you have to dedicate yourself to only playing heavy metal.
I could talk about this all day and keep going but I just finished an assignment and my brain is pretty fried.

EDIT: Keep in mind you can apply techniques that you may consider strictly metal to ANY genre. Many people consider sweeping for instance to be a metal exclusive technique. Why is this? Wanna play some 6 string minor harmonic sweeps in country music? Why the **** not. Pretty much all music is a fusion of different styles. How did Black Sabbath come about? They're considered like the first metal band ever. It's just a fusion of different styles.

I also think you shouldn't look at technique so narrow minded either such as sweep picking, alternate picking, legato, harmonics etc. There is so much more to technique and there's a bunch of shit i guarantee neither i nor you have even heard of.
Phrasing, volume swells, pick attack, bass slap technique. Even the ones i said i feel are bad examples of some of the possibilities. there are SOOOOO many things you can do with a guitar that come down to much more than hitting the right string and right note. Oh man there should be a book about this. There probably is. I feel like i haven't even touched the surface. There's just a disgusting amount of stuff.

People may also disagree with me on this one but try to improvise in no key or scale. I do it all the time. I improvise in a key or scale, but i also improvise in no key or scale. Most the good stuff i come up with comes from improvising in a completely free sense. At the end of the day you know what sounds good. You don't need a bunch of rules and guidelines to tell you what sounds good.
The stuff that does sound nice usually ends up being in a scale or key you didn't know you were playing in anyways.
Last edited by vayne92 at Aug 20, 2013,