#1
I finally got into violin theory the way I wanted to and my writing shows some improvement due to the understanding. Next, though, is drums.This is what I posted in the drum forums

If I can find no help there, maybe music theory will help. I mean what exactly is drum theory? And next to that, where can I find it without some guy selling me his website or "beginner's drum sections"?
At this point, I don't really want to learn to play drums but rather just understand them, though I'm not saying I'll never get behind a set. If those Beginner drum lessons are all I can get, though, I'll deal if I have to. Just wanting efficiency here.
Theory is just...wow. I'm getting a bit over my head by trying to learn so much w/o formal educators

Quote by DBKGUITAR
To be a good lead guitar you must be VERY GOOD AT RYTHM

Quote by MaggaraMarine
My motto: Play what the song needs you to play!
#2
I heard its what you can do with the snare that sets your own style. Most drummers play by ear as far as I know.
#3
Everything I know about drumming I learned from the video lessons on this website.
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#4
thanks, I'll be sure to check it out.
Theory is just...wow. I'm getting a bit over my head by trying to learn so much w/o formal educators

Quote by DBKGUITAR
To be a good lead guitar you must be VERY GOOD AT RYTHM

Quote by MaggaraMarine
My motto: Play what the song needs you to play!
#5
I don't really know what you mean about "drum theory". The same music theory applies to all instruments. But drums can't play melodies or chords so the music theory you (as a drummer) should know is all about rhythm (obviously). So different kind of rhythms and time signatures. There is drum notation but I think it works more as a guideline. I'm not sure if anybody follows it note for note or if it's so accurately written. At least in non-classical music (though in classical it's pretty rare that there's a drum set. Usually there's somebody who plays the snare and somebody who plays the cymbals and somebody who plays the bass drum).
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#6
I have been playing for 7 years now and well I can give you an idea of how to approach the set. Like the other posters said its based on feel the groove etc so that naturally comes with correct practice, time and experience with playing with other musicians. One concept I imagined was how do I recreate sounds I hear in everyday life to a drumbeat? Like what would wind sound like on the drumset? So I began trying to emulate this and the results are interesting. There are many concepts out there but many of them drummers discover during life experiences.
#7
I see. I never really thought about drumming til I ssaw Buddy Rich perform. After I showed my, a buddy showed me a joke vid of Lars Ulrich (who messed up Metallica for me when I started hearing better drummers....he does not fit), but I've noticed it's definitely more than just keeping a rhythm, even in Lars' case.
On repeating sounds, I do that on guitar lol I also remember a drummer stating that he goes through every song thinking how he can make it better. Used the example of his hand in writing "Running with Wolves" or Chased by Wolves" (*googles* I can't seem to find the drummer atm) said he was trying to capture the feel of running wolves as much as possible. I found that pretty cool as a guy who's only seen timekeepers at Pentecostal and Baptist churches before then.

But yeah, so far I have feel the groove, every drummer has their own style no matter what (that's actually pretty cool. Most guitarists ik try so hard to emulate others that originality is a tough thing to find) and, "Usually there's somebody who plays the snare and somebody who plays the cymbals and somebody who plays the bass drum" (which is why this theory thing is confusing. The only DrumSET theory I've seen were the tabs)
Theory is just...wow. I'm getting a bit over my head by trying to learn so much w/o formal educators

Quote by DBKGUITAR
To be a good lead guitar you must be VERY GOOD AT RYTHM

Quote by MaggaraMarine
My motto: Play what the song needs you to play!
#8
What sort of music are u playing? ive used free drum lessons a bit and from what i can gather it depends alot on the songs ur after , ie for contempory watch Jared Falk , etc ,

Jared is all about timing and playing it well , others ( cant remember their names ) seem more about passion and the accents played . I suppose like guitar playing the accentuations count just as much as the notes played .

But i suppose the easiest thing ive learned is the heavier the song the more the toms are used in place of the high hat , i mean apart from the basic , bass drum is the beat , snare is the backbeat . High hats tie the bass to the snare etc etc ( read toms instead of high hats for harder rock i would assume) , oh and that the bass drum is supposed to tie in with the bass guitar
.
Last edited by greg73 at Aug 21, 2013,
#9
I guess I'll start with Jared then spread to the rest since I wish to be a versatile musician. If I can be a tad specific, I want to play atmospheric type metal. Something like Soft-n-Heavy (coining that) is the best way I can describe it so drums would be the heavy end of it I'd think.

Oh and just to clear anything up, I keep bringing up [insert_instrument_here] theory for the simple fact that you can never go to another instrument with the same mindset of another (other than guitar and piano, and even that's a stretch). Guitar and bass for example. Guitar was my first instrument, and like most guitarist (oh just play the root note of whatever the guitarist does) psh I learned the bull in that statement the moment I tried playing bass. I'm pretty cautious now so I went into looking at the violin as a way to fit a violin in rather than just throw it in somewhere and now I'm looking at drums. Just wanted to throw that out there
Theory is just...wow. I'm getting a bit over my head by trying to learn so much w/o formal educators

Quote by DBKGUITAR
To be a good lead guitar you must be VERY GOOD AT RYTHM

Quote by MaggaraMarine
My motto: Play what the song needs you to play!
#10
Quote by MaggaraMarine
There is drum notation but I think it works more as a guideline. I'm not sure if anybody follows it note for note or if it's so accurately written.


nah in classical or big band type music you'd be expected to follow it properly.

as you said, it's just normal music theory except instead of the staff applying to notes, they apply to different drums/cymbals (e.g. one note is the snare, another is the hi-hat, etc.).
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
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#11
when I think music theory, I think practice, not language. I mean I'm learning staff reading but I know for tonal instruments there are certain notes or intervals that sound great together. How the heck does a drummer learn the basics of what two beats fit together, rather than just bashing random parts of the set and hoping that they'll get it?
Theory is just...wow. I'm getting a bit over my head by trying to learn so much w/o formal educators

Quote by DBKGUITAR
To be a good lead guitar you must be VERY GOOD AT RYTHM

Quote by MaggaraMarine
My motto: Play what the song needs you to play!
#12
^ You need to listen to the song. Listen to what beats you should accent. Snare and bass drums are the most important drums because they play the strongest beats. With hi-hat or ride cymbal people usually just play 8ths or 16ths all the time. So listen to what bass guitar plays. Listen to the rhythm of the song and accent the strong beats with snare and hi-hat.

There are no two beats that fit together. Actually all beats fit together. What I mean by this is that you need to listen to the rhythm of the song and play a beat that fits the song. If the rhythm changes, you just change your beat to fit the rhythm. And it flows if the song flows. Drums don't make it flow or not flow (or yeah, they can make it flow better if you play a fill just before a part change and they can ruin the flow if you play a fill in the wrong place - for example in the middle of the phrase, though in some cases it sounds cool).

Good thing to do when you write drum parts would be beatboxing a beat over a song and trying to replicate it with drums. That's what I do.

But yeah, it's good to know that most of the time with snare you want to accent the second and fourth beat and bass drum usually plays on the first and the third beat. You can add bass and snare beats or take them away to make it sound better. For example sometimes you don't want to play bass drum on the first beat (and this is actually pretty common). But if you play straight forward rock, bass drum on the 1st and 3rd beats and snare on the 2nd and 4th beats (and hi hat plays 8ths all the time) would work for pretty much everything. That's the basic beat and most 4/4 time signature beats are based on it.

I'm not good at playing drums but I know how to write drum beats. I use programmed drums for my songs. And as I said, I just start beatboxing over the song. Same as writing melodies by singing over the song.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Aug 21, 2013,
#13
Marine wins haha well yeah that helps a lot. I also took out some cool stuff in free drum lessons such as the X Fill so I'll be sure to check more out. Thanks again. I'll be asking more as I go on so fyi haha
Theory is just...wow. I'm getting a bit over my head by trying to learn so much w/o formal educators

Quote by DBKGUITAR
To be a good lead guitar you must be VERY GOOD AT RYTHM

Quote by MaggaraMarine
My motto: Play what the song needs you to play!
#14
there are a fair few pretty standard beats that work for a lot of things. aside from that, as MM says, once you get used to listening to and playing the drums etc. it should be fairly easy to work out.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?