#1
I've posted this specification sheet before here asking people's opinions but this time I was wondering if anyone could point out any other 'extreme' design considerations that you would put into a guitar.

For example with a Tune-o-Matic bridge you can choose to have a tailpiece or not and you can choose to recess the bridge for a lower action and a reduced string angle. Other things (that I've already included in the spec) are: Zero frets, compound radius, whether or not you'd like an angled headstock and if so how the scarf joint is created. Even aesthetic things such as the engraving on the truss cover and it's shape, the design of the strap locks and control knobs and pickup switches.

An 'extreme design consideration' to me is anything that goes beyond what someone normally thinks about when looking to buy or design a guitar. So basic design considerations would be things like: solid or hollow body, wood type, neck construction, number of strings etc...

Remember that this is a money-no-object guitar so it probably won't be made because it would be so expensive. But maybe one day when I've graduated university I could save up for it

Body
• Wood
o Mahogany (Quarter sawn)
o Naturally seasoned
• Design
o Solid body, Flat top
o Neck-Through
• Bridge
o Tune-O-Matic, Recessed
• String-Through
• Extended intonation
• .070 Compatible
o Cut-Titanium construction.
• Cryo-treated
• Hardware
o 3-Way Selector*
o Preamp bypass* (Push-push)
o 9v-24v switch* (Push-push)
o Kill-switch* (Push-push)
o Pickups
• Basic Spec
• Active (9v-24v)
• Humbucker
• Bladed Pole-Piece
• Sonic Characteristics:
• Tight bass and searing highs.
• Organic, warm and open.
• Lows: +1.75
• Low Mids: +3.0
• Mids: -1.0
• High Mids: +2.0
• Highs: +1.0


Neck
• Construction
o 3-Piece Maple (Quarter sawn)
o C-Shape
• Scale
o 28” Scale
• Frets
o 24 + ‘0’ Fret, Titanium
o Compound size
o Cryo-treated
• Fretboard
o Ebony
o Compound radius (Size TBC)
o Scalloped frets 21-24
• Neck
o C-Shape
• Headstock
o Scarf joint (Reinforced)
o Titanium nut, w/reduced contact to strings (Fit .070-.015 strings)
o Titanium tuners
• 21:1 Gear ratio
• Winged design


Strings:
• Number
o x6
• Winding
o Machine wound
o Round core
• Material
o Cobalt, Nickelplated
o Cryo-treated

Miscellaneous:
• Double-shielded electronics
• Active electronics system
• Pure silver conducting wire
• Copper cavity shielding
• Solder-less electronics
• Conservative wood removal

Aesthetics
Body

Finish
• Black satin
• Mother of Pearl top binding
• White plastic side binding

Pickups
• Ring-Mounted*
• Plastic Cover*
• Match body finish.

Neck
• Roman numeral side inlays
• Full Mother of Pearl Binding
• Black-stain finish

Headstock
• Inset truss cover, Metal, Matte Black finish
o Engraved Dümkaös sigil
• Full Mother of Pearl binding

Miscellaneous
• Strap locks
o Horned skull

* = Design to be confirmed
#2
Maybe it's not as "extreme" in the aesthetic sense, but if this were me I'd take stuff off instead of putting more on - or at the very least, take the time to really delve into the practicality of what you've specified. These "kitchen sink" guitars are often the first stop for people designing their dream guitar, but tend to lack any sort of practical consideration.

For example, you've listed active pickups, but then you want a preamp bypass, double-shielded electronics, and copper cavity shielding. This indicates to me that you're just copy/pasting things that you think sound cool. You can have passive pickups with a bypassable preamp, but it doesn't make sense to have a bypass on active pickups - they'd just cut out. As to the shielding, if you actually have active pickups, there is no practical reason to have three layers of shielding. There's not even an impractical reason. It's just wasteful. Titanium frets and nut are again an exercise in pointless spec-worship that are actually inferior in a lot of ways to their less sexy stainless steel and graphite counterparts.

I'm not trying to crush your dreams or anything here. It's really good to research specs and learn about cutting edge stuff that speaks to you. But I don't think that it would be helpful to suggest adding more impractical things to add to a guitar that contains enough confusion in its imaginary design already. It would be a mistake, I think, to continue to add more "junk" instead of actually refining your design, which at its most basic is a really interesting idea. Maybe that's what you had in mind, but it seemed like you were looking for more "cool" than "useful."

If you want extreme, tape a live koala to your guitar. That's extreme. If you actually want a cool guitar, put in the research and design it properly. Guitars designed to be "extreme" often turn out to be jokes (BC Rich Bich; those Jacksons with the kiddie skulls) while guitars designed to be ice-cold practical often end up looking and feeling extreme because focused performance is extreme. Think Blackmachine, Parker, Bernie Rico - those are all extreme because they have a purpose. Being extreme for its own sake is lame.

Anyway, sorry if I misconstrued your point, but a lot of people get bogged down in useless specs and endless "optimizing" and actually end up ruining the point of having a personalized instrument by tacking on a bunch of stuff they don't need.
#3
I agree with the above. 99% of that stuff listed is completely pointless and doenst do anything for the actual guitar. Pure silver wiring?
And i have never seen titanium frets or tuners... You would never find those. And if you did, they would be near impossible to work with.
And what exactly is a "reinforced scarf joint"?
#4
A reinforced scarf joint would probably be something like a carbon fiber sleeve, some reinforcement rods or studs, or just a volute. That part actually makes some sense, since that joint is often a weak spot.
#6
How would those not be reinforcing the scarf joint? I think it would be overly pedantic to say that those methods aren't reinforcing the joint. Obviously we're not talking about reinforcing the physical place where the woods meet, but the join itself. That's covered, I would say, by the methods I mentioned. Reinforcing can mean "support around," it doesn't have to mean "support within" a joint.
#8
Not if it's just over the joint
To me a reinforced neck is like what Vigier does where there are reinforcements along the whole length of the neck. A volute or two half-inch dowels or a 3" long carbon fiber sleeve over the joint itself could reasonably be called joint reinforcements. I guess you could call that a neck reinforcement but I don't see anything wrong with calling it a joint reinforcement, too.
#9
Yeah, I realize that some of the things in the spec aren't needed. I did try and justify everything in my head before putting it in.

For example I wanted a resistant metal for the frets so that re-fretting wouldn't be an issue so titanium came to mind.

As for the shielded electronics and copper insulation I wasn't sure how big of an issue electrical interference would be in an active circuit so I went with both without really thinking.

The silver conducting wire will come off but I originally chose it after seeing the Seymour Duncan Zephyr pickups. I suppose high-grade copper wire would be the alternative if I'm going to be fussy about it

I thought that the solderless circuitry was more of a solid connection thing rather than it being used to easily change components out for one another.

The passive pickup plus preamp is a better way of doing it than my original idea. I wanted to have a bypassable preamp rather than a volume control pot because of treble bleed, but I've read recently that in an active electronics system that isn't an issue. Can anyone verify that?

The reinforced scarf joint was something I read online. The wood was thicker at the point where the headstock angled away from the neck.

Sorry from the late response. I live in the UK and posted this a couple of hours before I went to sleep.
#10
I'd love a all-in-one pickup system with midi, active, passive, piezo, muter, and sustainer system.

I know that some Chapmans have the active, passive combo using phantom power which is awesome. Now only if they let you change the pickup power and what not.
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#11
Quote by MilesJeffery
stuff

Cool, looks like you're doing proper research on this. There's certainly a lot of information to work through.

Titanium isn't good for frets. There's no need for it, basically, and it's impossible to work with. Stainless Steel frets are the high durability option you're looking for. A titanium nut seems completely silly to me as well, I think someone makes them but metal nuts tend to be just awful. They don't lubricate well, they are hard to cut, and they often sound funny.

Electrical interference is basically not an issue with active pickups. Some people shield the cavity just for that extra level of protection, but insulating all the wires twice and then the cavity is overkill.

Those Duncan Zephyrs are a joke. Seriously. They came out around April Fool's day and there was a lot of speculation that they were actually a gag product to make fun of the Gear Page folks who obsess over ridiculous and irrelevant specs. There's what, five inches of wire in a guitar? First off, a passive pickup puts out about half a volt, you're not going to notice any difference between silver or high grade copper or anything else. Second, once the signal hits the preamp, it's going to get blasted through whatever overpriced wire you were using, and even if you had fifty feet of the stuff just coiled up in there you'd never hear a difference because at that point it's boosted and buffered. Lastly, I thought the Duncans used silver windings, not conductor wire. Maybe they do that too but it actually makes a little sense in the windings.

Treble bleed shouldn't be a problem in any properly wired guitar. Both active and passive systems can be tweaked to eliminate it. Most active systems don't need any help. With passives you just put a small treble bleed capacitor across the volume pot. You can change the value of the cap to alter the treble response over the sweep of the volume pot.

I wouldn't use solderless clips for a more solid connection. The clips are held on with...you guessed it, solder. Any properly done solder job should hold just fine, and there are a host of ways to add strength and redundancy if you are really worried about it. Solderless clips just introduce an extra point of failure.
#12
I'm gonna break this down into sections.


Body
• Wood
o Mahogany (Quarter sawn)
o Naturally seasoned
• Design
o Solid body, Flat top
o Neck-Through
• Bridge
o Tune-O-Matic, Recessed
• String-Through
• Extended intonation
• .070 Compatible
o Cut-Titanium construction.
• Cryo-treated
• Hardware
o 3-Way Selector*
o Preamp bypass* (Push-push)
o 9v-24v switch* (Push-push)
o Kill-switch* (Push-push)
o Pickups
• Basic Spec
• Active (9v-24v)
• Humbucker
• Bladed Pole-Piece
• Sonic Characteristics:
• Tight bass and searing highs.
• Organic, warm and open.
• Lows: +1.75
• Low Mids: +3.0
• Mids: -1.0
• High Mids: +2.0
• Highs: +1.0

Okay.
Quarter-sawn wood is only really important on the neck. Doesn't matter on the body, really.
Air dried wood is quite rare, actually - and kiln dried stuff is FAR more stable from what I've seen.
Most guitars can take a .070" string - the isue is more at the tuners.
Extended intonation - HOW? TOMs are relatively low range as bridges go - so maybe a hipshot would be a better option here.
The hell does "cut titanium construction" mean?


From experience, let me tell you right now that active pickups are a royal pain in the ass to wire compared to passives, and "Organic" and "Active" really don't usually go together too well. Plus, "warm" and "searing highs" are not gonna come together. Plus, 24v? Where'd you get that from? Most guitar pickups are 9 volt powered (in the case of EMGs, to the maximum of 27v). And bypassing the preamp on actives = no sound.


Neck
• Construction
o 3-Piece Maple (Quarter sawn)
o C-Shape
• Scale
o 28” Scale
• Frets
o 24 + ‘0’ Fret, Titanium
o Compound size
o Cryo-treated
• Fretboard
o Ebony
o Compound radius (Size TBC)
o Scalloped frets 21-24
• Neck
o C-Shape
• Headstock
o Scarf joint (Reinforced)
o Titanium nut, w/reduced contact to strings (Fit .070-.015 strings)
o Titanium tuners
• 21:1 Gear ratio
• Winged design



As has been said before, titanium is a terrible idea, as is a titanium nut. Stuff is stupidly hard to work with and it costs a LOT. For reference, a set of titanium Floyd Rose saddles is about 800 dollars. Stainless steel is what you'll want for your frets. For the nut... not metal. Sounds weird, binds a lot. As far as tuners - I've never had any wear with my tuners.

And .070"-.015" strings on a 28" scale... You'd have to be tuning to like Drop F# to have playable tension.


Miscellaneous:
• Double-shielded electronics
• Active electronics system
• Pure silver conducting wire
• Copper cavity shielding
• Solder-less electronics
• Conservative wood removal

No point to shielding 3x with Actives. There isn't a point with passives, either. Solderless electronics I'm leery of. Silver wire is stupid in this case and costs a ton.


So, to sum it up... The extra expense here wouldn't really buy you much of anything.
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Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.