#1
For major keys. I know it's Major,minor,minor,Major,Major,minor, and diminished, But what about for minor keys?What would be the harmonization for that?
#2
Simple.

It goes: i, iidim, III, iv, v, VI, VII.

Or min, dim, maj, min, min, maj, maj; if you prefer it in those terms.
#3
It is worth noting that V is very popular over v. I don't usually distinguish minor scales from their keys (V is from the Harmonic minor.)
#4
Quote by Erc
It is worth noting that V is very popular over v. I don't usually distinguish minor scales from their keys (V is from the Harmonic minor.)

That's true. Also, V7 is popular.
#6
Or you can easily remember the chord qualities as being the same as the major except starting from the 6th chord.
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#7
Quote by Erc
It is worth noting that V is very popular over v. I don't usually distinguish minor scales from their keys (V is from the Harmonic minor.)


Listen to minor key songs and you'll hear BOTH notes, the minor 7th of the natural minor scale and the raised 7th degree of the harmonic minor scale (which is the 3rd of the V chord, therefore changing it from a minor chord to a major chord)

Two good examples: Nothing Else matters - Metallica is in E minor so listen for both D natural and D#. The progression goes: Em |D C ||x3 (D natural in the root of the D triad) then: G B7 |Em || There's D natural in the G triad then D# in the B7 (listen to the tension that resolves to E in the Em triad)

Also, Like A Stone - Audioslave is in G minor and contains both F natural and F# (only in the D7 at the end of the chorus) and they compound the tension created by the raised 7th in that point in the song by dragging out the D7 for 4 bars (a six bar phrase)
#9
You need to understand where the maj, min, min, maj, maj, min, dim thing comes from. It's not just random figure. It comes from harmonizing the major scale. So just do the same to the minor scale - harmonize it.

How to harmonize? Start the scale with root, third and fifth you'll get the diatonic chords in the key. It's also good to remember that A minor scale has the same notes as C major scale so the chords you get are the same (except in A minor the key center is A instead of C).

Here's a harmonized A minor scale:

     R 3 5
i    A C E - A minor
ii*  B D F - B diminished
III  C E G - C major
iv   D F A - D minor
v    E G B - E minor
VI   F A C - F major
VII  G B D - G major
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Aug 23, 2013,
#10
Quote by J-Dawg158
Or you can easily remember the chord qualities as being the same as the major except starting from the 6th chord.

This, that's how I learned it. I guess there's the pitfall of still kind of thinking in major terms for it, but if you just write it all down and re-label them to fit, it makes lots of sense to me
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#11
Ive been recently reading through a book that makes a ton of sense to me in all terms, the only the issue i have is exactly this one. The Author says to think of Minor Keys as just being the 6th of a a Major key, and just to learn the sound of the 6th chord, and how notes go against it, even if it's being used as the center of resolution. in the Key of Bminor its just the 6th of Dmajor for him.
He explains to learn each Chords Sound and how all of the 12 notes sound against each of these chords, which he calls harmonic Worlds.
I've just recently been reading it so i havent given myself fully to the idea of doing this but it sounds interesting.
#12
Quote by HeretiK538
This, that's how I learned it. I guess there's the pitfall of still kind of thinking in major terms for it, but if you just write it all down and re-label them to fit, it makes lots of sense to me


That is very true. I suppose my post was a little too simplistic because there is more of a difference between major & minor than just starting on a different note. The difference being the way all of the other diatonic chords function with relation to the minor tonic. I merely wanted to point out that on paper the chord qualities are the same just in a different order, but you still have to know that the FUNCTION of each individual chord also changes when comparing a major key to its relative minor.

Maybe if more people grasped this concept we'd have a lot less of those "other" threads.
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#13
^ I hate it when everybody says "minor scale is a major scale STARTING on the 6th note". What does that even mean? You can start with any note and it's still the same scale. It may make learning the notes in the scale a bit easier (though I noticed that for me it didn't - I learned minor that way and I always had to first think about the relative major - now I kind of relearned it and now think it in intervals between the root and the other notes, ie 1-2-b3-4-5-b6-b7 and not as 6-7-1-2-3-4-5) but it completely forgets the different function of the notes. A minor and C major are different. They sound different. If you play "C major scale over A minor", it sounds like A minor scale and you are actually playing the A minor scale.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115