#1
Just curious. I am new to scales and I am working on the minor pentatonic five positions. I've heard differing views. When I practice them, should I only use my first and third fingers and move them about the shape, or should I should I use my pinky finger as well. It doesn't seem like I would use my pinky in a real setting as it's difficult to bend and pull with it, but I can move up the scale shape a lot of faster when I do.What do you guys think?
#2
Simply put, use your ring finger for the two frett gap and your pinky for the three frett gap. And yes you would use your pinky in a real setting. Go to www. justinguitar .com he has some really good free lessons which show finger positions. Cheers
#3
Quote by drb1982
Just curious. I am new to scales and I am working on the minor pentatonic five positions. I've heard differing views. When I practice them, should I only use my first and third fingers and move them about the shape, or should I should I use my pinky finger as well. It doesn't seem like I would use my pinky in a real setting as it's difficult to bend and pull with it, but I can move up the scale shape a lot of faster when I do.What do you guys think?
Well granted, the pinky has the least developed muscle structure of any of the other fingers. That's because it's not used as much in daily living. I've always said playing the guitar is a series of unnatural actions, and it surely is.

If you have long skinny fingers, (ala Jimi Hendrix), you can get away running pentatonic, (and other), scales using the Index, Middle, & Ring fingers. He's also famous for his, "Hendrix Grip", the thumb wraparound maneuver for the E open shape barre chord, another "blessing" of long fingers. Test out how far you can span on the piano keyboard, at least an octave is ideal.

The problem of not using the pinky erupts when you try to do certain chord fingerings, like sticking the sus4, on all barre chord shapes.

There is extra work getting the pinky fully involved. If you're committed to doing so, simple chromatic drills using the pinky for hammers and pulls, will move you along.

With chromatics, you don't really have to think, just work on muscle development, and muscle memory.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Aug 24, 2013,