#1
So I'm trying to decide between a TC Electronic MojoMojo overdrive, and a MXR GT-OD. I play an EC-1000 with SD pickups into a Line6 DT25. My preferred tones are usually pretty dark, Kyuss, Atomic Bitchwax, Sleep and Neurosis, etc

I like the sound of the MojoMojo a bit better, it's very bassy, and when the bass distorts it sounds all muddy or splatty and very, I don't know, distressed. Like the speaker is getting mashed, or something is distorting in a loud and violent way. I like this dirty mucky tone, it feels nasty and rocky, but on the other hand, it's not generally considered to be a 'good' tone. And to be honest, I don't really trust my own taste..! This is where the problems begin.

By having bassy distortion I get a 'feel' that my tone is heavy and loud, and the MojoMojo is doing that for me, but by the time I get to mixing a track, will I be regretting that I have a 'bad' tone? I am not experienced in that part of the process AT ALL. Maybe bass guitar, or doubled guitar tracks would add the thickness I like instead. The MXR I can only describe as 'smooth', and sounds a lot more like a typical overdrive.

So, I know which I like while I'm jamming, but I'm having a hard time guessing which pedal would sound better in a mix, or later down the line when my ear for this have become a bit better...

Advice welcome!!
Last edited by innovine at Aug 23, 2013,
#2
You can achieve your goals in multiple ways, I believe. I find that a raw, slightly overdriven guitar and an overdriven bass give a fat tone, but multiple guitar tracks are an option as well, of course. If it's for recording, don't be afraid to try stuff. I know people that run a fuzz pedal DI in a track that is mixed in with their "normal" drive sound. I did a track with the tone completely rolled off on the neck pickup for one of my bands songs and it blends in really well, yet sounds shit on it's own.

Live, I just play that part as it was recorded and the other guitarist plays his part as it was recorded (he has a really bright sounding strat tone) and it works really well.

Also, not "trusting" your taste is indeed where the problem starts, and frankly, also where it ends. If you don't believe in your tone, how do you expect some one else to? It's YOUR taste. I can name a ton of guitarists with tones I don't like, but that use it to great effect.
#3
So basically you want something akin to a sludge metal tone. There's no such thing as a "bad" tone.

Check out bands like Electric Wizard and Boris (amplifier worship). It's a sound used in that sort of area of rock and metal. Messy, muddy, and, well... sludgy...
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#4
Quote by I K0nijn I
Also, not "trusting" your taste is indeed where the problem starts, and frankly, also where it ends. If you don't believe in your tone, how do you expect some one else to?


I think taste and ear develop. Sure, this tone sounds good to me, but you can also give a badly out of tuned guitar to a beginner and they'll think it sounds fine. They might notice that it sounds better when it's tuned, but there's no guarantee of even that. I don't believe in the old "if it sounds good, it is good" line, as sounding good depends on your ears, and ears always have something to learn. My ears for dist and overdrive are not very well practiced, hence the question. 60 years ago any kind of distortion sounded bad Taste is a collective trend.
#5
Quote by Banjocal
So basically you want something akin to a sludge metal tone. There's no such thing as a "bad" tone.


I guess. I read that most sludge bands get their tones with fuzz pedals. The tone I'm getting now is vaguely along those lines but also a little different. Next greatest thing, who knows
#6
If it sounds bad to you, 99% chance it sounds bad to everyone else.
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#8
Quote by innovine
I think taste and ear develop. Sure, this tone sounds good to me, but you can also give a badly out of tuned guitar to a beginner and they'll think it sounds fine. They might notice that it sounds better when it's tuned, but there's no guarantee of even that. I don't believe in the old "if it sounds good, it is good" line, as sounding good depends on your ears, and ears always have something to learn. My ears for dist and overdrive are not very well practiced, hence the question. 60 years ago any kind of distortion sounded bad Taste is a collective trend.


Totally different things, though. Out of tune is out of tune, no less, no more. We're talking tone, a completely different thing.

What I said still counts, in my opinion. Tone isn't objective. Simple example is my band. I totally hate the other guitarists tone. It's way too bright and fizzy in my opinion, but the band as an entity sounds great, in my opinion. It's the same reason why an amplifier that works for me maybe won't work for you, and the other way around, yet neither is objectively better.

Sure, there are some do's and don't's to cut through, but in the end it's about what you like. Taste is preference and choice, not numerically quantified.

Will you be using a guitar tone that you will despise later on? Probably, but if you like it at the given time, why change it? There is a public opinion about tone for every genre you can imagine, but if you like your tone that is different, that's just fine. Don't change what you like to something you might like less because of a public opinion.

Also, what Robb said.