#3
Music Reading For Guitar by David Oakes is pretty good, don't let my lack of skill attest to it's quality.
edit: ninja'd
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
Last edited by Hydra150 at Aug 23, 2013,
#4
If you are really smart, you don't have to learn patterns, but for everybody else, learning patterns and having them under your fingers before you play will have you sight reading in no time.

So that makes things like czerny (for pianists like myself) to be very valuable in learning to sight read.
#5
Honestly, any guitar method learning book will work. The songs are amazingly shit! But, it'll no doubt teach you to read. The hardest part is the commitment to practice the shit songs imo.
Just another Sheep in the design of the Almighty Machine.


-GEAR-
Gibson 60s Les Paul Tribute (Sunburst)
1999 Ibanez RG470 (TitaniumIce-MIJ)
Jackson RR3 (Trans-Red)
Peavey 6505+
Podx3
#6
i think most people don't worry about reading music anymore
even a person who teaches at Berkeley said its not even a
requirement in there school . which is odd seeing how
every program in music uses these skill's
#9
The book Hydra and myself recommended, suggests external material also. I also read that one of Guthrie Govan's most prized possessions is Bach's solo partita's for violin. 😊
#10
i though it was hard but i found some vidoe on youtube every good boy does fine
and face. there are only 7 notes but you need to rember what the notes look like for each
string. iam geting that book Music Reading for Guitar (The Complete Method)
#11
I already know how to read music, I have my grade 6 music theory and will be taking grade 8 in the near future, it's just learning to read it and know where to play it on the guitar, I have a pretty good knowledge of the fretboard but I just need a starting point to learn to sight read
#13
Quote by gocosfs
just read tab its easier , look it up thats a great starting point

It's also something that only guitar players or bass players tend to do. Reading sheet music is something that all musicians should learn how to do, and that includes learning how to site read.

@TS:
I think the biggest thing is to practice. You need to get familiar enough with reading sheet music that you can see it and know what the notes are without thinking. Then, you need to keep doing that until you can read and play without thinking.
#14
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
Reading sheet music is something that all musicians should learn how to do

not necessarily
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
and that includes learning how to site read.

yeah, I do reccomend that guitarists read this site
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#15
Quote by Hydra150
not necessarily

I supposed I could have prefaced that with, if you want to be able to do more than just work with a standard drums, bass, guitar, & singer rock band. (I guess I thought that was implied is all.)

yeah, I do recommend that guitarists read this site

#16
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
I supposed I could have prefaced that with, if you want to be able to do more than just work with a standard drums, bass, guitar, & singer rock band. (I guess I thought that was implied is all.)

so you were implying rock musicians aren't musicians?
okay
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#17
Quote by Hydra150
so you were implying rock musicians aren't musicians?
okay

No, just that you may not need to site read sheet music in that type of band setup.
#18
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
No, just that you may not need to site read sheet music in that type of band setup.

okay
but don't say 'no' when you mean 'yes', it's intellectually dishonest
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#19
Quote by Hydra150
okay
but don't say 'no' when you mean 'yes', it's intellectually dishonest

What if I mean both "yes" and "no"?
#20
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
Wow...I just realized I've been misspelling "sight" all this time...I hate it when I do that...

What if I mean both "yes" and "no"?

If we're talking about quantum music notation then that's a different issue entirely.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#21
And you quoted before I edited that. Arrrrgh.

Quote by Hydra150
If we're talking about quantum music notation then that's a different issue entirely.
Well, damn.
#22
i don't see when reading music is really needed seeing how most
music is improvised or transcribed by the individual by ear
everything else is in TAB

other than maybe orchestra music
#23
Quote by gocosfs
i don't see when reading music is really needed seeing how most
music is improvised or transcribed by the individual by ear
everything else is in TAB

other than maybe orchestra music

Um...guitar and bass players are really the only people who use tabs. (Yes, there's things like drum tabs & such.) The majority of musicians use sheet music. Sight reading is a good skill to have.
#24
To everyone saying just read tab it's easier, I am a very capable guitar player and I can read tab... I start university in 3 weeks and I will be taught how to sight read etc.. however I wanted to get some practice in before I start so I'm not behind everyone else, I know that some other guitarists there won't be able to sight read either, I just wanted to get ahead of the game a bit
#25
Just depends on what your goals are mate. If you're a good reader you'll be more employable, and certainly more confident in your abilities.

Dep work is good.
#26
sure they may be those very few times were
it might be useful. though mostly they will give u a list of the
music (cover band/TAB) or there own material (transcribe by ear) or TAB based on popularity
or session/studio work (improvisation) unless there cover tunes

some of the most highly paid session artist's say and i quote
" we never read music we go in they give us the chords and we create music
what we don't create we just listen "

guitarist's are lucky in a sense because usually people that hire u
will say just do what u want to as long as it sounds good this apply's
to all instruments in session/studio work most of the time

im not disagreeing about learning it just saying its
never really used in most situations

to TS: like MDC say's whatever your goals are it will only improve
your ability .
#27
Quote by JNBloomy
Can any suggest me books or anything for me to learn how to side read from actually scores instead of just tabs? preferably starting from the beginning like grade 1 sight reading for guitar?

i was taught how to read music at 11 years old and it has helped me very much. the majority of guitar players or musicians out there do not sight read music. currently sight reading is mostly for classical music, voice and brass/orchestra instruments(piano clarinet sax etc). it is also a remnant from the pre-recorded music era. however if you're a guitar player and learn to read classical musical notation you will be one step ahead of the majority of "guitar musicians" out there. there are no books that i have seen that teach the way that i learned. i had been taking lessons since i was 9 years old. i was always taught by learning the notes on each string in the first position and was always very confused by that method (alfred method, mel bay method, et al). i then, at 11y.o., took private tutoring lessons from a university guitar teacher who had a different more intuitive method it's the way "strings" are taught and is what i recomend.
Last edited by blueplayer at Aug 31, 2013,
#28
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
Um...guitar and bass players are really the only people who use tabs. (Yes, there's things like drum tabs & such.) The majority of musicians use sheet music. Sight reading is a good skill to have.


I don't have any stats handy but I'd be willing to bet that guitarists easily make up the largest slice of the musician pie. It's not just western culture, either. I've traveled all over the world and the guitar is everywhere. It's been adopted into just about every music culture. I'm traveling to Romania in a couple of months and I hope to check some regional folk instruments. I bet they are much rarer than guitars there, just like in every other country. Turkey is one of the few places on earth that might have as many distinctly Turkish instruments as they do guitars in most shops.


I'm not disagreeing that it's a good idea to learn to read music but there's a reason why the only big box music retailer in the world is called "Guitar Center".
#29
Quote by gocosfs

im not disagreeing about learning it just saying its
never really used in most situations
.


I have to disagree with you there. I have gotten multiple jobs cause i can read notation and sight read. I have played in multiple orchestras for musicals that have been set up where i live, and they won't let you in unless you can play from notation, cause they order the notation for the songs and don't have the time to show someone how to play, they expect you to be able to do it yourself.

Same with session work i've done. When you book time in the studio you often have to pay for each day you are in the studio. If i didn't know how to read i wouldn't have been asked to play, cause they just send you the sheet music and expect you to be able to play it exactly like it's written a couple of days later. With tab you have no idea of articulation or how the rhythm is.

So i strongly believe that if you want to be a professional musician and work with it outside of a band environment learning to read standard notation is one of the essential things you have to do, doesn't matter if you're a violinist or a bass player.

Now back to TS.

As for practicing sight reading, i just recommend reading a lot. Setting aside 10-30 minutes every practice session to sight read is great. Cause like with everything else, it's a habit and you often have to do it on a daily basis to get really into it. When you've done it for a long time it becomes somewhat of second nature.

Think of learning to talk when you were little. You did it everyday, even if you couldn't make yourself understood. But you tried everyday, and now talking is second nature to you. If you sight read a little everyday and just make sure you start slowly and with appropriate material you should be fine. It's a process that takes time.

The book that mdc and Hydra recommended is also a very good resource that i would suggest you take a look at.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#30
Quote by gocosfs
i think most people don't worry about reading music anymore
even a person who teaches at Berkeley said its not even a
requirement in there school . which is odd seeing how
every program in music uses these skill's


This is not true. One of my best friends has been there for about a year and he said he had to learn to sight read for the audition and he said all his work is in standard notation.
Just another Sheep in the design of the Almighty Machine.


-GEAR-
Gibson 60s Les Paul Tribute (Sunburst)
1999 Ibanez RG470 (TitaniumIce-MIJ)
Jackson RR3 (Trans-Red)
Peavey 6505+
Podx3
#31
I'm slowly getting better at reading because I'm transcribing using Guitar Pro. There's just no way to get the rhythm correct without understanding note durations on the staff. This was the difficult part for me when I tried to read in the past. Memorizing note locations is easy, it's the timing that is frustrating (for me).

However, outside of transcribing, I have never had much use for it which makes it difficult to really internalize. I've played in quite a few bands and musical projects and actual staff notation was never used. However, neither was tab. Chord charts and audio files are all I've really had to work with. To further complicate things, I play multiple instruments which I've never seen ANY sheet music arranged for (Turkish Cumbus, for example). Try finding sheet music arranged for pedal steel.

I figure it's just like any language. If you don't use it, you lose it and the scenarios where I would need it seem to be rare. This has always killed my motivation to dedicate much practice time to reading.
Last edited by Sabicas at Sep 6, 2013,
#32
Thanks for all the help, I bought the RGT guide to sight reading, so far it's helping me grasp simple melodies and the notes on the fretboard. I know it may not been seen as a must have skill as most guitar stuff is tabbed, improvised or done by ear but I want to do session work once I finish university and if I wouldn't like to lose work due to the fact I can't sight read if the music is given as a score so I believe it to be a very useful skill to have.
#33
Quote by gocosfs
i don't see when reading music is really needed seeing how most
music is improvised or transcribed by the individual by ear
everything else is in TAB

other than maybe orchestra music


To: the functionally illiterate;

classical guitar was around for 400 years try improvising f. sor , or segovia. before that, the lute goes back to classical greece et alia. moreover the bass (which has the same note patterns as the violin) can be sight-read ( i read jack bruce all the time even though he was not written that way). pul your head out
#34
As someone who's recently picked up the violin, I find sight reading really helpful. I've only been doing it for two weeks prior to this post but it a useful skill to have. I've been learning songs on guitar by TAB for nearly five years and honestly I can easily read sheet music and play on the violin than look at numbers on TAB and play guitar.