#1
It's time to upgrade from my $300 Fender acoustic which I've had for years now. Not only has it started to have technical problems, it is extremely hard to play for more than an hour (I've build up endurance). I'm looking for a durable guitar, with decent volume, and has a nice action for soloing and access to most frets. I'd rather not get something expensive that I'd treat like fine china, just something that will last and withstand travel and various indoor and outdoor conditions (hopefully nothing too extreme). Thanks for any input, if you need more information let me know.
#2
Quote by Jackolope
...[ ]....Not only has it started to have technical problems, it is extremely hard to play for more than an hour (I've build up endurance). I'm looking for a durable guitar, with decent volume, and has a nice action for soloing and access to most frets. ...[ ].....
The syntax is somewhat confusing here. If, as you say, you've "built up endurance", I would think you'd be able to play for more than half an hour.

With that out of the way, how about looking into the Guild GAD series?

Takamine has some good mid price offerings. Good for the stage, with good electronics.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Aug 23, 2013,
#3
I'll look into it thanks. What I meant by that is it's a hard guitar to play, and it took time to play reasonably.
#4
Quote by Jackolope
I'll look into it thanks. What I meant by that is it's a hard guitar to play, and it took time to play reasonably.
Is the guitar set up properly? What's the action height?

I have a Fender "Sonoran" that's somewhat temperamental also.
#5
No idea, it was never set up. I do not intend on repairing it and keeping it instead of a new guitar. A proper set up would really be in my favor though.
#6
Quote by Jackolope
No idea, it was never set up. I do not intend on repairing it and keeping it instead of a new guitar. A proper set up would really be in my favor though.
Well no, I wasn't suggesting that your repair it in lieu of buying another. It probably isn't worth that much to sell. I'd suggest fixing it, and keeping it to save wear and tear on your prime instrument. You could use it for alternate tunings perhaps.

With that said, a new guitar generally needs to be set up from the jump. Most manufacturers ship with a fairly high action, and you're liable to have the same, or close to the same situation you have now.

One thing I'd suggest you do, is you learn a bit more about guitar setup and repair before you commit to another purchase. An informed shopper is a better, smarter, shopper.

Here's a great setup guide: http://thbecker.net/guitar_playing/guitars_and_setup/setup_page_01.html reading through it surely couldn't hurt. Another source for this information is supposed to be YouTube. I can't speak from experience on that though.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Aug 24, 2013,
#7
Go out and try a bunch in your price range. Since you've been playing for awhile you'll more of what your looking for in terms of size and playability and durability.
#8
I don't know how to test durability. I understand playing the guitar in person though.
#9
dude, if your guitar is hard to play, get a set up. i've done that with guitars costing from under $100 to several thousand. and chances are over time, you may periodically have to set up any guitar you buy periodically. not only that, but guitars at stores aren't set up as low as i prefer, so usually first thing i do is get 'em set up. it can make a huge difference.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#10
Quote by Jackolope
I don't know how to test durability. I understand playing the guitar in person though.


I should have said construction or something to that effect. You had mentioned travelling and playing outside. I find some guitars sound/play great but feel more fragile than others(I can think of the Yamaha FG750 and the Larivee L-02) or others look good but the quality of the parts and construction seems half assish(I found the lower to mid priced epiphones to be this way).

I agree with the others, a set up on your current guitar would be a good start, but if your ready for a different guitar, have fun looking and enjoy the process.
#11
Alright will do, thanks. I see what you mean by judging based of the feel of the guitar. Should I also look up which woods are stronger or something similar to that?
#12
Quote by Jackolope
...[ ]....I see what you mean by judging based of the feel of the guitar. Should I also look up which woods are stronger or something similar to that?
That won't do any good. Guitar woods are chosen for tonality, rather than brute force breaking strength. The majority of acoustics are going to be mahogany body & neck, with sitka spruce sound boards. Cheaper instruments in a line may feature Nato and Sapele, and higher end guitars may be either rosewood or maple (sides & back). Those 2 choices are based on the tonal character of those woods, not the breaking strength.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Aug 25, 2013,
#13
Alright thanks guys. I'll try and fix the action first, and replace the broken tuning head.