Poll: Who got da best booty?
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View poll results: Who got da best booty?
Rihanna
12 10%
Beyonce
32 26%
Miley Cyrus
15 12%
Lindsay Lohan
5 4%
Katy Perry
53 43%
Lady Gaga
5 4%
Voters: 122.
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#1
Was having a talk with an old dude who used to play in a band, tour the UK, dadled in Germany, etc.

Was chilling in his room, he had a guitar lying there, he told me to pick it up and play it (He can't play anymore, he's had x strokes, too much boozing).

He said that my playing was more "elastic" and "different".

Well that got me thinking...that dude was playing guitar in the 70s. He probably can't read sheet music. I haven't got an idea how he managed to learn how to play. I reckon they used books, learned from watching others, got help from professionals, until eventually, it made sense to them and they managed to come out with riffs and chords.

However, with the internet, we can learn anything from Japanese video game theme songs to Hendrix. Nigga, we learn whatever we want.

Discuss.
#5
mo' technology means mo' good guitarists.
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Your post was the only bright spot in this disgusting piece of thread.

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You have balls. I like balls....(awkward silence)

Quote by SeveralSpecies
I waited for the rape.

...


...but the rape never came
#9
Quote by LostLegion
No. Guitarists are shitter nowadays

There's more guitarists than there ever were, and a lot of people take it up and don't put much effort in, maybe they played Guitar Hero or something and thought they should get one, so there's more bad guitarists than before
on the other hand, there is so much more freely available tuition material than ever before that any kid who actually does want to put a modicum of effort in will make good progress, and this is evidenced by the overwhelming number of bedroom shredders you can see on youtube, who would amaze the guitarists of the 60s with their technical proficient
but for every one of those who is actually good there's ten tone-deaf terribads
and not ever the decent ones leave their bedrooms most of the time, so it's all pointless

also, not having to use one's ear to learn to play and relying on tabs lets many young guitarists ignore vital skills and grow into crappy musicians
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
Last edited by Hydra150 at Aug 24, 2013,
#12
Learning from ear can make you a great guitarist, but its definitely slower.

This attribute doesn't necessarily translate into being able to phrase well, or have good technique. We have the privilege of watching thousands of guitarists at will who have perfected their technique, which we can learn from.

I'd say the best now are better than the best of any other time, but you need to factor in the limitations of the time.

Technique is better, talent is the same.
#13
Yes. Josh Middleton from Sylosis blows away any metal guitarist from the 80's. The technique is just different and more crazy.
Quote by Venice King
Snatch is such a crude term - Use a better one like axe-wound or cave-opening.

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I make trip-hop
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^ Check it out
#14
We may learn faster than previous generations, but that doesn't mean we're better. How many chords you know doesn't make you a good guitarist.

I don't know how to read sheet music, yet most songs I hear, I can learn to play if you give me some time. F*ck tabs!

So it's easier to learn guitar nowadays, but I don't think there are better guitarists. Most guitarists nowadays only know what frets they need to play. Back then, they knew what SOUNDS they needed to make
Did that make any sense?
#17
I would argue so. I know plenty of people are going to cite all of the innovators of the past as being unbeatable, but hear me out. To me, there are two different musical skills. Creating, and performing. Creating relates to your ability to compose, to improvise, to innovate, and so on. Performing is your ability to physical manipulate your instrument to do what you want it to do. It is very common to be great at one, but not the other. People that are excellent at the first, but not the second, I would call great writers, or great innovators, but not great guitar players. What I'm getting at is that many great musicians who played guitar and get credit as being legends, let's say Chuck Berry, or Kurt Cobain, or Dimebag, or so forth, these guys should get all the credit in the world for innovating and being great musicians, but I don't consider them phenomenal guitar players. There are plenty of guitarists today that would smoke most of these legends as players, even if you don't find them as creative.

I hope that makes sense to everybody.
#18
**** no.
Better, Faster, Stronger

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Hey guys in the last 3 weeks I ****ed all the girls in this picture, what do you think?

#20
Technical ability doesn't do shit if you can't put your heart into it.
#21
Quote by ryan_nadon
mo' technology means mo' good guitarists.


It also means a shit load of mediocre guitarists.
ayy lmao
#23
Yes.
Proof :
On playing the Paul Gilbert signature at the guitar store extensively, my missus sighed:
"Put it down now, It's like you love that guitar more than me!"
In Which I replied.
"Well it has got two F-Holes!"
#25
Quote by LostLegion
No. Guitarists are shitter nowadays


Always one guy who says this with zero argument to back it up...


Anywho,

In terms of technical ability I say yes, we (currently) have the best generation of guitarists. I personally believe this has always been the case and that a later generation has always brought more technically able musicians.
I say this for a simple reason...Take, Eddie Van Halen, just for an example. He popularized tapping and brought it to the masses. Before him very VERY few people used the technique at all. Once he had popularized it people everywhere where able to grow up knowing about and hearing tapping within songs and be able to learn that skill in their natural learning progression rather than, yano, the people who had only just heard this fantastic 'tapping' thing after they had been playing for 30+ years and struggle to learn the new technique so far into their guitar playing career.
This works with pretty much everything with guitar in my opinion from the way Hendrix popularized distortion to whoever popularized sweeping.
Newer generations have more source material to work with than older generations essentially. You can find hundreds of people who can do a sweet shredding solo with sweeps and taps everywhere today just by spending 10 minutes on youtube but, try finding just one person with that ability 60 years ago.

In terms of pure feeling, there is no actual answer to that. Feeling is something every generation has and hasn't had in their guitarists. Sure, some guitarists from 30 years ago can make the hair on the back of your neck stand to attention with just 3 notes but, I can easily find somebody from the past 5 years who can do the same and make me feel the same.
A reason this generation my seem like it has less 'feels' in the guitarists is because we just have so many of them and can view so many of them thanks to things like youtube. We don't have less guitarists who portray emotion in their songs, we just have a lot more guitarists as a whole.
When I was eleven I broke the patio window and my mother sued me... She's always been a very aggressive litigator.
#26
A few centuries ago if you wanted to learn an instrument you first had to be born into a wealthy family.

Nowadays, you just go to any old garage sale, pick up a squire for a few dollars, find some books or use the internet, and you can learn how to make some noise.

I think our generation has a lot more privilege allowing for greater potential, but that's referring to technical skill.

I think in terms of creativity, that's a whole different discussion.
#27
Anyone who didn't vote Beyonce is blind.
That ass is so nice.
Katy Perry doesn't have a booty at all.
#28
Quote by ryan_nadon
mo' technology means mo' good guitarists.



Mhmm Gibson Robot guitar, nuff said!

On another note, yeah we are definitely the most privileged!
JUST ANOTHER ANNOYING BIG STATUS
#29
Is the whole generation better on a playing level? Yeah. There is probably some 12 year old kid in his bedroom who is better than most of the guitar legends from the 70's - 90's.

But musically I'd say this is probably the most boring generation. If everyone was as good as Michael Jordan there would have been no excitement in the league.
#30
Does anyone actually think Katy Perry has a nicer booty than Rihanna? It must be racism.
#31
Just bought perpetual burn and speed metal symphony. And you think we are the best guitarists...
#32
Y'all can't write for shit! I rarely hear riffs or licks that blow me away anymore. Who give a flip how technical someone can get if it sounds like crap.
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#33
Not the "best" generation, but we have it easier than the guitarists of the previous generations.

There's a lot of people who have no band experience whatsoever and are absolutely amazing though.
#34
I face myself a blister playing DADFAD in 3/8 at 135 bpm with my thumb. Does that count?
Tomorrow will take us away
Far from home
No one will ever know our names
But the bards' songs will remain
Tomorrow will take it away
The fear of today
It will be gone
Due to our magic songs

ALL HAIL CELESTIA
#35
Quote by scott john
Y'all can't write for shit! I rarely hear riffs or licks that blow me away anymore. Who give a flip how technical someone can get if it sounds like crap.

The reason riffs don't blow you away anymore is because you grew up. Not because riffs are worse now.
#36
Quote by scott john
Y'all can't write for shit! I rarely hear riffs or licks that blow me away anymore. Who give a flip how technical someone can get if it sounds like crap.


Good writer =/= Good guitarist

Playing incredibly technical things makes you a good guitar player. Coming up with riffs that blow people away makes you a good writer. Most of the legends are just good writers, and a large number of modern players can guitar circles around them. Being able to write good songs and innovate is the more important skill, sure, but it's irrelevant to the answer of the thread's question.

As legendary and important as somebody might find any random iconic guitar player, Angus Young, Jimmi Hedrix, Jimmy Page, Tony Iommi, and so forth to be, there are still endless modern guitarists that make their playing look nooby in comparison, and that by definition makes them better guitarists. Not better creators, not better musicians in general, but better guitarists for sure.

For instance, you may not like the music this guy creates, or consider him unique or innovative in any way, but can it really be denied that he's a better guitarist than any of my above mentioned guitarists? Not necessarily a better creator, but a better guitarist?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ihqT1aA4Q88
Last edited by Macabre_Turtle at Aug 24, 2013,
#37
No. The arts are flourishing more than ever before in the sense that you no longer have to be wealthy, but I don't think that we are better in the sense that the average guitar player today is better than the average guitar player of the past.
#38
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
Good writer =/= Good guitarist

For instance, you may not like the music this guy creates, or consider him unique or innovative in any way, but can it really be denied that he's a better guitarist than any of my above mentioned guitarists? Not necessarily a better creator, but a better guitarist?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ihqT1aA4Q88


That's the thing...it's completely subjective. What sounds like a heap of trash to one person sounds great to someone else. And of course, people will become more technical over time. But the other guys ate all the killer up riffs long before any of the kids today got a chance.

I guess if the "better" means more technical than you have a won the debate. When was the last time a guitarist wrote are riff or lick as epic as the likes of Gilmour, EVH, or Page? I believe it has been some time.

Maybe it's that people don't really give a crap about guitar music anymore. Govan and all the other guys are very talented people...they're just not what came before. George Harrison always said, "Less is more." There is some truth to that.
EBMM Axis Black Cherry Burst
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'74 Phase 90 re-issue
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Last edited by scott john at Aug 25, 2013,
#39
Quote by scott john
That's the thing...it's completely subjective. What sounds like a heap of trash to one person sounds great to someone else. And of course, people will become more technical over time. But the other guys ate all the killer up riffs long before any of the kids today got a chance.

I guess if the "better" means more technical than you have a won the debate. When was the last time a guitarist wrote are riff or lick as epic as the likes of Gilmour, EVH, or Page? I believe it has been some time.


This is exactly why I'm making the distinction between a good writer and a good guitarist. I'm sure 75% of people of the world that cares about guitarists would insist that the three names you mention are the superior guitar players, but what they really mean is that they write better music. Not that they have superior guitar playing skills.
#40
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
This is exactly why I'm making the distinction between a good writer and a good guitarist. I'm sure 75% of people of the world that cares about guitarists would insist that the three names you mention are the superior guitar players, but what they really mean is that they write better music. Not that they have superior guitar playing skills.



Good skills don't mean shit if you can't apply them.
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